Cornbread dressing


#1

I love it when a recipe says it's ready for the pan when it looks like gelatinous goo.


#2

I love cornbread dressing... Will be making ours tomorrow morning. :)


#3

YES!!! My favorite! My dad's cornbread dressing is nice and spicy and really savory... Cannot WAIT! :D


#4

I have never seen such a recipe! Wow. That would kind of make me ill. I am doing GF dressing, was going to make 1/2 bread and 1/2 cornbread but can’t find that recipe.


#5

Goo no more.

Now I just have to make myself stay away from it!!! I love cornbread dressing.

This will be a first for my in-laws, as cornbread dressing is a southern tradition and I am now firmly in the Midwest.


#6

[quote="1ke, post:1, topic:220688"]
I love it when a recipe says it's ready for the pan when it looks like gelatinous goo.

[/quote]

Thank you for making it possible that I will be able to stick with my resolve to not overeat tomorrow.....


#7

Why are you all referring to STUFFING as dressing! That is just plain weird!


#8

in the culinary world, it's "stuffing" if it's inside of a bird, and "dressing" if it's cooked seperately. also, most southerners always refer to it as dressing. just a cool piece of cook trivia!


#9

[quote="kib, post:7, topic:220688"]
Why are you all referring to STUFFING as dressing! That is just plain weird!

[/quote]

It is not stuffing if one does not *stuff *the bird with it. It is *dressing *when it is baked separately. You don't put cornbread dressing in the bird, therefore it is not stuffing.

Which term you use, whether it's come from the bird or not, is also a difference in regional dialect. Dressing is prevalent in some parts of the country while stuffing is predominant in others.


#10

Got to love the regional dialect! :p

Enjoy your "dressing".


#11

Someone needs to tell the "Stovetop" company. ;)


#12

[quote="Seatuck, post:11, topic:220688"]
Someone needs to tell the "Stovetop" company. ;)

[/quote]

Stovetop is clearly a Northern company. And, FWIW, people in my city will buy a box of the Stovetop mix and still call it dressing. :)

But Stovetop has nothing on cornbread dressing....


#13

[quote="1ke, post:1, topic:220688"]
I love it when a recipe says it's ready for the pan when it looks like gelatinous goo.

[/quote]

that is the basic conflict about turkey dressing in general, is it supposed to be more like a pudding, moist, hold its shape when served, or is it supposed to be dryer, crumblier, soak up more gravy. that argument will be held in many kitchens today
along with onion vs no onion
cook inside or outside the bird
and so forth

happy T-day to all
DH is at church already they expect to serve over 1000 dinners based on tickets that have been given away, two big bbq rigs in the schoolyard yesterday roast 70 turkeys

there are over 250 small appliances to give away as door prizes, and a room full kitchen and household wares--new, donated to those who requested their needs.

we will probably have spaghetti this evening having been oversated with turkey sights and smells


#14

I did not know that there was even a dressing recipe out there...

I thought you just mixed it all together and left it gooey ... it must be gooey or else it will be dry after cooking.

Oh, and I do not like boiled eggs in the dressing, my mom is so generous because she puts the eggs on one side! Just for me to avoid.


#15

[quote="DJgang, post:14, topic:220688"]
I did not know that there was even a dressing recipe out there...

I thought you just mixed it all together and left it gooey ... it must be gooey or else it will be dry after cooking.

Oh, and I do not like boiled eggs in the dressing, my mom is so generous because she puts the eggs on one side! Just for me to avoid.

[/quote]

Who puts boiled egg in dressing??? YUK.


#16

[quote="1ke, post:15, topic:220688"]
Who puts boiled egg in dressing??? YUK.

[/quote]

Yikes! This brings back BAD memories... we lived with family in New York state about 13 years ago and one in-law (who had few discernable cooking skills and used ketchup like salt--on everything) told us that SHE wanted to cook the Thanksgiving turkey (there were 17 people in the house) using her grandmother's stuffing recipe--made with hard-boiled eggs, walnuts and pork sausage. No cries of delight greeted this pronouncement, and things got worse when she described the cooking process as involving no fewer than 12 eggs, 2 pounds of RAW Jimmy Dean sausage... and the fact that the stuffing was, indeed, cooked INSIDE the bird!

Visions of spending Thanksgiving weekend in the ER danced in our heads... the fact that her husband (at whose sister's house we were staying) announced that he was spending the holiday with friends only solidified our fears.

So early Thanksgiving morning (around 5--our chef never got out of bed before 8) one of the other guests and I met in the kitchen and "accidentally" used the sausage to make biscuits and gravy for breakfast (they lived in the sticks--no last minute runs to the store on Thanksgiving day!) and used the hard-boiled eggs to make deviled eggs for appetizers (the walnuts got thrown into a dish on the coffee table, to keep the eggs company). Yes, the chef was a bit put out that her culinary skills were not spotlighted, but since she managed to eat our dressing without drowning it in ketchup, we figured she got over it!


#17

[quote="bluerose, post:16, topic:220688"]
Yikes! This brings back BAD memories... we lived with family in New York state about 13 years ago and one in-law (who had few discernable cooking skills and used ketchup like salt--on everything) told us that SHE wanted to cook the Thanksgiving turkey (there were 17 people in the house) using her grandmother's stuffing recipe--made with hard-boiled eggs, walnuts and pork sausage. No cries of delight greeted this pronouncement, and things got worse when she described the cooking process as involving no fewer than 12 eggs, 2 pounds of RAW Jimmy Dean sausage... and the fact that the stuffing was, indeed, cooked INSIDE the bird!

Visions of spending Thanksgiving weekend in the ER danced in our heads... the fact that her husband (at whose sister's house we were staying) announced that he was spending the holiday with friends only solidified our fears.

So early Thanksgiving morning (around 5--our chef never got out of bed before 8) one of the other guests and I met in the kitchen and "accidentally" used the sausage to make biscuits and gravy for breakfast (they lived in the sticks--no last minute runs to the store on Thanksgiving day!) and used the hard-boiled eggs to make deviled eggs for appetizers (the walnuts got thrown into a dish on the coffee table, to keep the eggs company). Yes, the chef was a bit put out that her culinary skills were not spotlighted, but since she managed to eat our dressing without drowning it in ketchup, we figured she got over it!

[/quote]

Awesome story! And quick thinking by the guests!


#18

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