Could car seat laws really be lowering birthrates?

Yeah Logan is a good car. Though I think what you on the continent mean by the Logan is the sedan. In Ireland and the UK we just have the Estate/Wagon version called the Logan MCV. I’ve had mine for two years now and it’s great and cheap to run. I have heard of people getting three car seats into the Logan or Sandero. There’s a great owners group on Facebook where you could ask about fitting three car seats and what seats will fit. Dacia Logan MCV Owners Club UK.

Link below:

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I’d like to point out that putting a child into the middle of three car seats is an acrobatic accomplishment in itself! Even the amount of time needed to strap three children in is often longer than the trip! :joy:

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Yeah. But it is possible. Perhaps the child seat thing was a deterrent to kids years ago. But there’s any number of seats on the market now and you should be able to find a combination that works for any car. The real issue would be trying to fit three baby seats into a three door hatchback. :rofl:

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I’m trying to picture even two in a British Mini! :joy:

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Do you have mini in the US? They’re bigger now than they were years ago. But horrible little cars. The lights on some are configured to look like the British flag.

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Oh, yeah…we have them! Both the older really little ones and the newer roomier ones…often with British flag paint jobs on them. I remember when I first started seeing them…my only thoughts were…don’t be in a wreck and boy! Easy to park!

I live in SUV country (Colorado) and odds are, if you’re in a wreck, it’ll be with an SUV. I suppose if the Mini went under the SUV they may escape death but pretty unlikely.

They’re cute but in a totally non functional way. We get deep snows on occasion and I don’t picture them handling snow very well…but, they are cute!

this Logan is bigger than the one of my parents.

They don’t have the third window on the side (for what purpose, is there a possible third row of seats?), but a separate car boot.

No, it is not possible to have three children seats in any cars. Far from that. I insist, Many people have to change car when the third child is born. For those who don’t do this, they put the baby in the front set and the mother in the back between the two seats. And when he grows, they put him on the back and the oldest child go without any car seat even if he is younger than 10 years old.

we have a three doors car, I am slim and I can only slip me between the car seat and the baby car seat with difficulty and I have to stay a little from the side because I can’t put my hips right.
With two normal cars set it would not be a lot better.

Yeah. The Brit flag would turn me off…lol. But then I am Irish.

This is true but many small cars now do come with a five star NCAP rating so there’s that. SUV’s are fine in a country area, what you guys call an SUV is probably a lot bigger than what we would term an SVU in Europe. You are probably thinking Volkswagen Amarok or Nissan Navara when you say SUV? But here it’s like Nissan Qashqai or Kia Sportage. Like a family hatch on stilts.

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Typical American SUV! Yep, a bit bigger!
image

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They probably have a sandero, or the logan sedan.

No, a third row of seats is not possible with this car.

Youi could try a Dacia Lodgy, which I think is available throughout the EU, except for Ireland and the UK. It’s a seven seater MPV.

Lodgy

I definitely have seen people do this.

I’m sure that is the case.

We do have those but mainly farmers and wealthy mothers drive them. The annual tax on them is very high here. Most of our SUV’s are less off-road and more hatchback.

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Maybe people in Ireland use to have “bigger” car than in France?

Thanks you for the idea of Dacia Lodgy seven seater MPV. It’s unlikely to change his decison to not have any more children, but it’s still an argument…!

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Perhaps. I don’t know if that is the case or not.

No problem. I hope you sort something out anyway. :+1:

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The idea that only 57 children were saved annually by car seats is a gross underestimate. That they would premise much of their argument on this claim without significant development makes me suspicious of their methodology.

They directly cite Steven Levitt, who is known for statistical liberties, to arrive at this number. (I had a strong feeling Levitt of “Freak-o-nomics” fame would be involved before diving into the report).

The field of economics is highly speculative, using extremely simple numeric models to predict complex phenomenon. It is primarily oriented to helping improve economic growth, and lots of random variables are tested to see if they can offer insight. This paper is part of that effort. At most, it might invite some additional investigation into the engineering justification behind car seats.

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