Creation or Evolution. What do you believe?


#1

I am curious as to where people stand on the origins of man.

You believe in:

Creationism (young earth, old earth or middle aged earth)

Evolution

Mel


#2

Little confused, before I vote. Are we saying Evolution involves no God (either guiding or planning or sparking) and Creationism is the strict 7 days (24 yrs)?

Just trying to figure out where I would fall.

I believe God began the Act of Creation, guided it throughout, and specifically sculpted and made creation. I do not believe that Man emerged from a tiny one-cell organism, etc. Just trying to figure out where I would fall.


#3

[quote=NWUArmyROTC]Little confused, before I vote. Are we saying Evolution involves no God (either guiding or planning or sparking) and Creationism is the strict 7 days (24 yrs)?

Just trying to figure out where I would fall.

I believe God began the Act of Creation, guided it throughout, and specifically sculpted and made creation. I do not believe that Man emerged from a tiny one-cell organism, etc. Just trying to figure out where I would fall.
[/quote]

I was assuming all respondants are theists. I should have put Theistic Evolution. Feel free to vote what you think best fits and then qualify (well you already did that). :slight_smile:


#4

[quote=Melchior]I was assuming all respondants are theists. I should have put Theistic Evolution. Feel free to vote what you think best fits and then qualify (well you already did that). :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Evolution seems to strike me as an Atheistic theory. Course, it is never taught as a theory, and they conveniently skip over the whole, dead no life and then life thing. Then magically over 3 billion years we go from being little one celled bacteria to Man. Pure Evolution requires a belief in God, it is so fanciful otherwise.

Hmm, still trying to figure out where to go. I am putting Creation, because I don’t think every creature and thing emerged from the same line as Evolution would dictate, but God began other creations as things went. Since a day to God is like a 1000 years and vice versa, I’ll go with Creationism.


#5

Kind of a false dilemma. You could nuance it by including choices like microevolution as opposed to macroevolution, pehaps Intelligent Design, etc.

Scott


#6

Young Earth Creation!

Six 24 hour period days and one 24 hour period of rest!


#7

I think that Tolkien would have agreed with ‘middle-aged earth’…(sorry for the ba pun). :stuck_out_tongue:


#8

I have no problem believing in both. There is no doubt in my mind that God created the Heavens and the Earth and all the creatures of the Earth, and mankind.

I also believe that the purpose of Genesis was to teach us this fundemental truth about God the Creator.

I have no problem accepting that God would allow evolution as a means of creation. In fact, given the changes our Earth has apparently undergone over the years, it makes sense to me that He did allow a mechanism for creatures to change and adapt. Natural selection, to me, is an extremely elegant means of promoting life in a changing world. It points me even closer to God, rather than farther from Him.


#9

I didn’t vote either. It’s not really an either/or issue.


#10

I have never had a problem reconciling the theory of evolution with my faith in God. I voted for evolution, but I know I do not possess the capacity to understand God’s mystery or His methods.


#11

[quote=Ric]Young Earth Creation!

Six 24 hour period days and one 24 hour period of rest!
[/quote]

Brother Ric, I wholeheartedly agree!

Brian


#12

[quote=brianberean]Brother Ric, I wholeheartedly agree!

Brian
[/quote]

God Bless you my Brother in Christ!

I just added to your “Reputation” points!


#13

[quote=tcaseyrochester]I have never had a problem reconciling the theory of evolution with my faith in God. I voted for evolution, but I know I do not possess the capacity to understand God’s mystery or His methods.
[/quote]

Ditto.


#14

I voted for evolution, but could easily vote for creationism if you define it as God starting the ball rolling so to speak (the Big Bang), and tinkering during the evolution process. In that way I’m a creationist too (like Fr. Stanley Jaki, Pope John Paul II, and Cardinal Ratzinger I believe his book and commentary on Genesis).

You young-earthers need to read some science. Dalrymple is widely available, just go to a library. :smiley: Many of the people doing science today are Christians. See this ASA3.org article on radiometric dating

The creationist geologists well before Darwin knew the earth was old. Young-earthism died 200 years ago, and Geocentrism about 300 years ago. :smiley:

Changing Views of the History of the Earth

Phil P


#15

I believe that God created everything outside of Himself ex nihilo. And I believe that the human soul is directly created by God for each person, that it did not evolve from anything else. I affirm that there was a first father and mother to the entire human race.

As for whether the earth is six thousand or six billion years old, and whether God created the first man’s body directly out of inanimate components or through a series of evolving organisms, I honestly couldn’t care less.

Justin


#16

<< I honestly couldn’t care less >>

He’s got to add another category

Creationism
Theistic Evolution
Don’t Carism or Don’t Knowism :thumbsup:

He should add Intelligent Design as well. Dembski claims ID and theistic evolution are not compatible, so I guess that’s another category.


#17

I’m a Catholic scientist (my area of specialty is outside of evolutionary biology), and I’d say that I find the Church’s stance on creation agrees with what most of modern science proclaims. The Big Bang theory and ex nihilo are compatible–time and space just did not exist beforehand.

Similarly, micro-evolution has been proven time and again in the laboratory. Macro-evolution is the one most people have trouble with and is by far the most contested scientific theory. I’ve read Dawin’s The Origin of Species, as well as many books by Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins. While they lay out a fairly good case for “unguided” macro-evolution, they make a good number of assumptions that may or may not be true–only time and assiduous research will tell.

Bottom Line: There is plenty of room for God in evolution, whether guided every step of the way from single-celled organisms or by some other method.


#18

Creation 24-7 :smiley:

When Moses, under the stimulation of God, compiled the story of creation in the book of Genesis, he used the Hebrew word yôm for ‘day’. He combined yôm with numbers and with the words ‘evening and morning’, and the first time he employed it he cautiously defined the significance of yôm as being one night/day cycle (Genesis 1:5). throughout the Bible, yôm used in this way and always refers to a full 24–hour day. So when God used the word yôm in this way, He intended to suggest that the days of creation were 24 hours long. :slight_smile:

Yours in the Spirit

Pious


#19

Theistic evolution here. Yes, the evidence says evolution. No, it can’t have happened without divine design behind it all.


#20

[quote=opticks]I’m a Catholic scientist (my area of specialty is outside of evolutionary biology), and I’d say that I find the Church’s stance on creation agrees with what most of modern science proclaims. The Big Bang theory and ex nihilo are compatible–time and space just did not exist beforehand.

Similarly, micro-evolution has been proven time and again in the laboratory. Macro-evolution is the one most people have trouble with and is by far the most contested scientific theory. I’ve read Dawin’s The Origin of Species, as well as many books by Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins. While they lay out a fairly good case for “unguided” macro-evolution, they make a good number of assumptions that may or may not be true–only time and assiduous research will tell.

Bottom Line: There is plenty of room for God in evolution, whether guided every step of the way from single-celled organisms or by some other method.
[/quote]

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, we believe that Adam and Eve were the first people God created and from them all others have descended. Also the doctrine of original sin is a strongly held belief in Catholicism and all other Christian groups. This doctrine includes the concept that death did not exist before the fall of Adam and Eve.

Romans 5:12 “Therefore as sin came into the world through one man and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all men sinned.”

All theories of evolution (even theistic evolution) include the concept that death existed for millions of years prior to Adam and Eve. The two ideas (evolution and biblical creation/original sin) simply are not compatible any way you look at it.

The theistic evolutionist is undergoing quite a bit of mental gymnastics to reconcile evolution with biblical creation and doctrine of original sin. Truth cannot contradict truth. When all you know about science or your view of the physical universe seems to contradict the bible you have to bend both science and your interpretation of the bible to make them fit together. Thus we get theistic evolution theories.

The good news is there is plenty of science that supports the idea of biblical creation. Darwinism is rapidly crumbling and is not fit to survive. The fossil record’s Cambrian Explosion and lack of transitional forms have been known for decades to disprove Darwinism. Even Stephen Jay Gould admitted to this fact . That’s why he invented his rediculous theory of “punctuated equilibrium”. The fact that DNA had to precede the onset of the so-called natural selection process coupled with the fact that science has shown, (and even staunch evolutionists accept the fact), that DNA cannot be spontaneously generated in nature also disproves Darwinism. Francis Crick, co-discoverer of DNA and devout atheist, threw out Darwin long ago. Then he disgraced himself and the name of science with his theory of “directed panspermia” postulating that DNA must have been sent to this planet by aliens from another planet. And most recently molecular biology’s concept of “irreducible complexity” disproves Darwinism. Natural selection just could not have happened. Hundreds of reputable scientists around the world have written books and papers refuting evolution theory.

It is a good thing that I feel Catholics and all Christians should be making a lot of noise about - the preponderance of the evidence accumulating during recent decades sides with church teachings and the biblical creation story.


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