Crucifix veiled at Easter Mass


#1

My new parish has a huge Crucifix on the altar. Throughout lent it was covered with a purple cloth.

On Easter morning the cloth was changed to white.

Why was the crucifix covered at Easter Mass?


#2

Just a guest. The pastor and Liturgy director wanted to focus on the risen Chist. Some chuechs will take to corpus off the cross during Easter Season.


#3

Was it totally ‘covered’ or simply ‘draped’ like this:

parenting.leehansen.com/downloads/clipart/easter/pages/easter-draped-cross.htm


#4

[quote="Phemie, post:3, topic:321153"]
Was it totally 'covered' or simply 'draped' like this:

parenting.leehansen.com/downloads/clipart/easter/pages/easter-draped-cross.htm

[/quote]

Totally covered.


#5

Your guess is as good as mine. Doesn’t make a whole lot of sense to me.


#6

This was not the case at my parish; however, there was a cross (without the corpus, draped with a white sheet; the crucifix that hangs in front of the altar was not covered) that stood in front of the statue of Our Lady, and I believe it was meant to symbolize the Christ's Resurrection.

In my own home, I draped a white veil over my crucifix to symbolize the Risen Christ. Perhaps that is the intention at your parish?


#7

The central crucifix must never be veiled. If your parish chooses to veil images after the Fifth Sunday of Lent, the images that must remain uncovered are stained glass windows, Stations of the Cross, and one Crucifix which must always be present when a Mass is celebrated. Does your parish use the Benedictine altar arrangement, with a crucifix facing the versus populum priest on the altar?


#8

So even at the end of Lent a crucifix must be present and unveiled somewhere in the sanctuary?


#9

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:1, topic:321153"]
Why was the crucifix covered at Easter Mass?

[/quote]

We can only speculate, really. For the most accurate answer, someone would have to ask the people who did it.

[quote="FAB, post:2, topic:321153"]
Some chuechs will take to corpus off the cross during Easter Season.

[/quote]

In the past, at least, the General Instruction of the Roman Missal specified that "a cross with the figure of Christ crucified upon it" should be used in entrance processions and that "there is also to be a cross, with the figure of Christ crucified on it" visible not only during Mass but at all times, recalling "for the faithful the saving passion of the Lord, [and] remain[ing] near the altar even outside of liturgical celebrations." Other images of Christ and the cross may be present as well, such as a window depicting Christ enthroned in glory or a cross with the risen Christ superimposed, as long as a crucifix is also present.


#10

[quote="Elizium23, post:7, topic:321153"]
The central crucifix must never be veiled. If your parish chooses to veil images after the Fifth Sunday of Lent, the images that must remain uncovered are stained glass windows, Stations of the Cross, and one Crucifix which must always be present when a Mass is celebrated. Does your parish use the Benedictine altar arrangement, with a crucifix facing the versus populum priest on the altar?

[/quote]

Please provide a source that says that the altar cross may not be veiled during the latter part of Lent.


#11

[quote="Chatter163, post:10, topic:321153"]
Please provide a source that says that the altar cross may not be veiled during the latter part of Lent.

[/quote]

A ZENIT DAILY DISPATCH - Covering of Crosses and Images in Lent

First of all, I would first like to recommend Monsignor Peter Elliott's excellent guide "Celebrations of the Liturgical Year" published by Ignatius Press in 2002. It is a very useful resource for all those involved in the practical aspects of liturgical planning.

Veiling during all of Lent may have been a common practice in the Middle Ages, but it has been restricted to Passiontide for several centuries. Hence, the practice our reader described is incorrect. The altar or processional cross is not veiled and, indeed, its use is implied in the rubrics for the solemn Masses of Palm Sunday and Holy Thursday.


#12

up till Holy Saturday, ours is veiled by red see through gauze. it is really cool looking.


#13

The Processional Cross is called for during the transfer of the Blessed Sacrament to the Altar of Repose. Since we are supposed to pretend that the covered images/icons/crosses are not there, what would be the point of a veiled cross at that time?


#14

This would seem to make some sense for the processional cross, but not the altar cross. I see an interpretation, but no directive that says that the altar cross should not be covered.


#15

Who knows. Ask the pastor or person responsible for such things. It sounds like someone’s creative interpretation to me.


#16

I think it comes down to the fact that veiling is a pious custom not really covered in detail by liturgical rubrics. It is certainly an option, not mandatory, and there are some rough guidelines set down, for example the prescribed date after which veiling is acceptable. But I think details such as which images are left uncovered are just that, creative interpretations, and if anyone has the book I referenced in my last post, it can be quoted for us to read, but again, does not have the force of law and only pious custom.


#17

[quote="Sunbreak, post:15, topic:321153"]
Who knows. Ask the pastor or person responsible for such things. It sounds like someone's creative interpretation to me.

[/quote]

I think you are right. I am new at the parish. I don't want to go to the pastor with a long list of questions. I asked him about a couple of things. It seems that he considers himself a scripture scholar and an expert liturgist. He is enhancing our experiences.


#18

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