Crucifixion

Were any of the apostles besides John at the crucifixion?

No. Scripture tells us:

:bible1: “At this they laid hands on him and arrested him. One of the bystanders drew his sword, struck the high priest’s servant, and cut off his ear. Jesus said to them in reply, “Have you come out as against a robber, with swords and clubs, to seize me? Day after day I was with you teaching in the temple area, yet you did not arrest me; but that the scriptures may be fulfilled.” And they all left him and fled.” Mark 14:46-50

In addition, John lists only the following at the foot of the Cross:

:bible1: “Standing by the cross of Jesus were his mother and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary of Magdala. When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple there whom he loved, he said to his mother, ‘Woman, behold, your son.’” John 19:25-26

It is hard for me to understand why none of the deciples would try and help Jesus.

They were subject to human emotions (fear, depair, anxiety, doubt) and not yet strengthened by the Holy Spirit?

[quote=philipbenedict]They were subject to human emotions (fear, depair, anxiety, doubt) and not yet strengthened by the Holy Spirit?
[/quote]

That’s exactly right. They were human beings, at times very weak human beings. They constantly squabbled over who was greatest, consistently misunderstood Christ’s words, and failed to see the truth of the Resurrection until God Himself came and explained it to them. Yet these are the men Christ chose to lead His Church, precisely because they were so human, and precisely because He knew what incredible examples they would be to the rest of the Church following their transformation at Pentecost.

That’s exactly right. They were human beings, at times very weak human beings. They constantly squabbled over who was greatest, consistently misunderstood Christ’s words, and failed to see the truth of the Resurrection until God Himself came and explained it to them. Yet these are the men Christ chose to lead His Church, precisely because they were so human, and precisely because He knew what incredible examples they would be to the rest of the Church following their transformation at Pentecost.

Beautifully expressed. Not only that, the fact that these men, from such depths of weakness and fear, went on to become martyrs for the faith, gives us hope that we, with our fears and our faults, can become examples of our faith to others as well, no matter how weak we are or how often we’ve stumbled in the past.

[quote=philipbenedict]They were subject to human emotions (fear, depair, anxiety, doubt) and not yet strengthened by the Holy Spirit?
[/quote]

They had not yet received the charism of taking the Gospel into the whole world–of holy boldness to speak the truth in the teeth of persecution. Jesus had breathed the Holy Spirit upon them to give them the charism of binding and loosing, but that was all. At Pentecost they received the power of God through the Holy Spirit to stand up to the sort of things that Jesus had endured. And they did endure such things. Most of them were martryed for their faith in Christ.

I think the timing of these charisms was deliberate on Christ’s part. I believe he didn’t want them to die with him when he was crucified–who would take the Gospel into the world if they had been killed? And I know God could have raised up new believers, but these men had been hand-picked by Jesus and were witnesses to both his ministry and to the events surrounding his death and resurrection.

By only one disciple (besides Mary and some other women) at the crucifixion, the Romans and the Jews didn’t get all worked up about a conspiracy, etc., which they already feared, as the biblical accounts clearly show). It also helped save the lives of the Apostles whom Jesus had chosen to lead his Church which he established on Peter and the Apostles, as I cited above.

I hope that helps you. It’s only a very brief explanation for a subject worthy of a few dozen books. Thanks for bringing it up! :slight_smile:

The Gospels says that John was the only one at the foot of the cross,but I think the rest of the disciples were watching far from Golgotha,they abandoned Him at the moment of the arrest,but after all Jesus was their friend and I believe they stood far from the multitude on the Calvary to avoid to be recognized by religious authorities.

[quote=piscotikus]It is hard for me to understand why none of the deciples would try and help Jesus.
[/quote]

they stayed hidden in the upper room for fear of the Jews (and of the Roman authorities) white rightly, if Jesus could be caught and punished, so could they. They had not yet received the grace of the Holy Spirit, and his gift of fortitude, which enabled them to come out and witness Christ at Pentecost

It has been speculated that the Apostle John may have been able to move more freely than the other apostles in such circumstances because he may have been very young, and a member of a priestly family. An example of this is how, during Jesus’ trial, he was able to gain admittance into the court of the high priest while Peter remained outside (John 18:15-16).

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