Curiosity about Liturgy and Clergy


#1

Peace,Love and Blessings Through Him :)

Hello,please excuse me for the bother-for this is a light question(which I may be asking for simple attention but.. )

Is it true that all clergy are mandated to recite the Liturgy of the Hours and please for any clergy here please explain the impact that the Divine Office has made on your lives?

For those who looked at this post,thank you for taking your time and have a wonderful day.


#2

It is my understanding that those ordained to the priesthood are bound to recite the Divine Office. The Catechism (#1175) states,

"His [Christ's] members participate [in the Liturgy of the Hours] according to their own place in the Church and the circumstances of their lives: priests devoted to the pastoral ministry, because they are called to remain diligent in prayer and the service of the word; religious, by the charism of their consecrated lives; all the faithful as much as possible..."

.

As a seminarian, my recitation of the Divine Office simply allows the Word of God to work in me. Being constantly reminded of God's salvific plan for all of us, through the Psalms, readings and canticles, allows me to gain a deeper understanding of the Second Person in the Divine Trinity (i.e. Verbum Dei) and ultimately, allows me to love Him more fully.


#3

Agree 100% with Facite...the Divine Office...if you use it...will help to keep you on a straight path. It creates a nice balance in your life.

When I was in seminary, we would moning prayers at 8:00 am, evening prayers (vespers) at 5:00 pm and night prayers (compline) were on our own time for most of the week.

I highly recommend it. You can know that when you pray it alone, Pope Francis, Pope Emeritus Benedict, and all the clergy throughout the world are on the same page with you praying the exact same thing....not to mention many laypeople pray it as well.

Men who are ordained deacons and priests make promises to pray the Liturgy of the Hours for the rest of their days.

I think I read the logic behind the Liturgy of the Hours is that it creates a constant channel of prayer that rises up to the Lord. We need that now more than ever.


#4

I agree with the above posters. Praying the Breviary constantly reminds us of God's plan of salvation, and allows us to look back on salvation history. It also helps us keep St. Paul's command to "pray without ceasing."

I personally find that if I slip up and forget a few hours, or even a day, I'm much more likely to fall to sin or the near occasion of sin. The frequent, structured prayer not only imparts God's grace, but also the discipline we need to live holy lives.


#5

In answer the the OP's question, yes clergy are mandated to say the LOTH (although not all hours).

As a seminarian, I pray morning, evening and night prayer every day - either communally or on my own. Morning and Evening prayer have been described as "the hinges on which the day rests" and I've always found this to be a very appropriate description. There's something about having my day revolve around prayer which I find both appealing and reassuring - it's become a constant in my life.


#6

[quote="InThePew, post:5, topic:332059"]
In answer the the OP's question, yes clergy are mandated to say the LOTH (although not all hours).

[/quote]

Actually, I believe that all bishops, priests, and transitional deacons must say each office of the Divine Office. Permanent deacons say some of it...as determined by himself or by his Ordinary, I think. And then consecrated religious say the LOTH according to the rules of their orders, unless they are ordained, and then the rules for priests take precedence


#7

It mean a lot to me, while praying psalms I become a part of whole Church prayer; I'm connected with all my brother and sisters in Christ around the world and we together pray to God, Our Lord ... What power of prayer?! :)

Breviary fills me with deep peace and love. I can't describe it - it's amazing.

I usually pray Lauds (Laudes) at 7 o'clock am, Sext (Sexta) at 12 am with Angelus in Church, Vespers (Vesperae) at 6 pm, Holy Mass at 7 pm and Compine (Completorium) at 8pm or 9pm. Feasts also Terce (Terca) at 9 am and None (Nona) at 3 pm :)

Thank you all who pray with us! :) May God bless you!

In Christo,
frater Attempto

Post Scriptum: Tridentine Divine Office (Brevarium Romanum, 1962) with five psalms is also very nice :)


#8

[quote="NickD, post:6, topic:332059"]
Actually, I believe that all bishops, priests, and transitional deacons must say each office of the Divine Office. Permanent deacons say some of it...as determined by himself or by his Ordinary, I think. And then consecrated religious say the LOTH according to the rules of their orders, unless they are ordained, and then the rules for priests take precedence

[/quote]

Well, yes and no, and no and yes :D

All Latin-rite priests and transitional deacons have the obligation to pray the entire Liturgy of the Hours, promising to do so at their ordination. However, what this actually means is different to what it might seem. This "entire" LOTH comprises: the Office of Readings, morning prayer (lauds), oneof the three hours during the day (terce, sext and none), evening prayer (vespers) and night prayer (compline). In contrast some orders, such as the Bendictines for example, have their own, more extensive version which basically involves prayer throughout the day (and night) and, as far as I know, don't draw a distinction between ordained and non-ordained members - they're members on their order first an foremost.


#9

[quote="InThePew, post:8, topic:332059"]
Well, yes and no, and no and yes :D

All Latin-rite priests and transitional deacons have the obligation to pray the entire Liturgy of the Hours, promising to do so at their ordination. However, what this actually means is different to what it might seem. This "entire" LOTH comprises: the Office of Readings, morning prayer (lauds), oneof the three hours during the day (terce, sext and none), evening prayer (vespers) and night prayer (compline). In contrast some orders, such as the Bendictines for example, have their own, more extensive version which basically involves prayer throughout the day (and night) and, as far as I know, don't draw a distinction between ordained and non-ordained members - they're members on their order first an foremost.

[/quote]

Too much thinking :P I'm a layman, so I'll do whatever I darn please! Haha. But in all honesty, if I join a religious community, (which at this point seems reasonably probable) I'll just do what they tell me to do. It's easier that way :)


#10

It is my understanding permanent deacons must recite the LTOH, especially the Morning and Evening portions, unless the bishop says otherwise.


#11

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