Current Rubrics

Hi!

I can read on the following website:
newadvent.org/cathen/04386c.htm
newadvent.org/cathen/01355a.htm

The following (summarized) “rules” (amongst others) in relation to Corporals, Palls, Purificators and finger towels:

Corporals

  • Must be made of pure white linen or hemp
  • No embellishment or embroidery
  • Muslin or cotton Corporals are forbidden
  • Edges may be ornamented with fine lace
  • Cross may be worked into it near the front edge
  • No cross is allowed in its center
  • Square at least 15x15" (38.1x38.1cm) or oblong, 14x18" (35.56x45.72xcm)
  • Must be blessed by a bishop or priest having the faculty to do so, before it may be used the first time
  • Use at the Holy Sacrifice does not constitute a blessing
  • Form of blessing is “Benedictio corporalium” (Rituale Romanum) in singular always (even if many corporals are blessed at the same time)
  • Looses it’s blessing when no part of it is sufficiently large to hold the chalice and the host together
  • Forbidden to use a torn or ripped corporal
  • When it becomes unfit for use, it should be destroyed by fire, and its ashes thrown into the sacrarium
  • Folded in 3 equal parts: anterior over middle, posterior over anterior, right over middle, left over middle or when larger (and was used to cover the chalice as well) it was commonly folded in 4 parts: four times in length, thrice in breadth. This practice is still followed by some of the older religious orders
  • A little starch may be used to stiffen/give a smooth surface

Pall

  • Single piece or two pieces (may have cardboard in between) of Linen or hemp
  • Upper side may be ornamented with embroidery or painting in various colors or covered with cloth of gold, silver or some silk of any color except black. May be embellished with a cross or some other emblem
  • Nether piece must always be of plain white linen or hemp and be detachable for the purpose of washing it
  • Blessing is “Benedictio corporalium” (Rituale Romanum) used without change in number or words when blessing one or more palls alone or one or more palls with one or more corporals
  • Blessed be a bishop, or by a priest who has faculties to do so
  • Should be large enough to cover the paten
  • Folded corporal may be used instead
  • A little starch may be used to stiffen/give a smooth surface

Purificator

  • White linen or hemp
  • No prescribed size (usually 12 to 18" long, and 9 or 19" wide)
  • Folded in 3 layers so that when placed on the chalice beneath the paten its width is about 3" (7.62cm)
  • Small cross may be worked in at its center to distinguish it from the little finger towels, although not prescribed
  • Not blessed
  • Purificators are always prepared without starch

Finger towels

  • May be made of any material, preferably however of linen or hemp, and of any size

My questions: besides the GIRM (which I have a copy of) where can I find current and detailed rubrics for the Mass and these sort of items? Are the above all still applicable?

Peter Eliot’s book Celebrating the modern roman rite is good.
It spells out a lot of info, one of my bishops used this for us.

Your quotes date back to before the 1917 Code of Canon Law. Not sure that there is such a requirement today. Generally, all the corporals & purificators I’ve washed and ironed had a cross embroidered in the center. Most were made of cotton, some even probably a polyester/cotton blend. Rarely did I see one made of linen.

Your quotes date back to before the 1917 Code of Canon Law. Not sure that there is such a requirement today. Generally, all the corporals & purificators I’ve washed and ironed had a cross embroidered in the center. Most were made of cotton, some even probably a polyester/cotton blend. Rarely did I see one made of linen.

I can really not imagine/think that so much would have changed that all this is allowed.

Given all the significant changes that have occurred I can’t believe anything regarding these details are as significant.

Peter Eliot’s book Celebrating the modern roman rite is good.
It spells out a lot of info, one of my bishops used this for us.

Thank you! I’ve ordered this book.

Allow me to ask a rephrased question: How could anything which has to do with Eucharist (which is the “Source and Summit of the life and Mission of the Church”) - in other words - Jesus - not be significant?

…designates the two [palls and corporals] as “linteamen ad tegendum involvendumque Corpus et Sanguinem D.N.J.C.”, i.e. to cover and enfold the Body and Blood of Christ

Could my original questions be reconsidered please:

Besides the GIRM (which I have a copy of) where can I find current and detailed rubrics for the Mass and these sort of items? Are the above all still applicable?

I am specifically looking for authoritative websites, information, books, anything that may help.

Easy. Should we sit in pews, or chairs? Is that choice significant?

What if no seating is available, and everyone stands or sits on the floor?

Is that significant?

Anyone?

Maybe Canon Law would have more on these. Will check later.

The formal current and detailed rubrics are in the GIRM and the Missal (Sacramentary).

If you’re looking for further theological readings, there are oh so many sources.

This is a pretty recent book I’d recommend: amazon.com/Commentary-General-Instruction-Roman-Missal/dp/0814660177

The Eucharist itself cannot change because Christ used wheaten bread and grape wine at the Last Supper.

The stuff around it though can (which would include the celebration of the whole Mass itself). The cloth material I would guess had to do with preference or durability or something at the time, and the cross in the middle may or may not have had a reason. There’s nothing in what you’ve quoted to suggest a why for any of this stuff, so without knowing we can’t say whether or not the material or embroidery or whatever has a significance.

Isn’t the GIRM sufficient? What more guidance do you need?

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.