Daily mass - questions


#1

I'm in R.C.I.A. and currently I go to church every week for Adoration, and for Sunday Mass. I feel like the other days I just wait for the days when I go to church and can be in the Real Presence of Jesus. I can't receive him of course but just being in his Presence feeds my soul. The past few days, the longing for Jesus has been so strong that it was painful.

I've been thinking for a while about how I would like to go to daily mass, but then I think, "I'm only in R.C.I.A., it would be strange, I'm overdoing it, etc." But lately, I just feel miserable about not going. Today a friend of mine who isn't even Catholic said to me, "You need to go to daily mass!" :shrug: I hadn't even said anything about wanting to go.

So I have some questions.
1) Is it alright for me to go?
2) Did any of you who converted ever go to daily mass before converting? I mean before you were able to receive the Eucharist.
3) What is it like? Is it shorter than the mass on Sunday? Is there music? A homily?

I don't know. Maybe I'm just going crazy. :(


#2

Hi Student09-

It is more than alright to go to daily Mass before you're "official"! I was just received into full communion this past Easter Vigil, but I went to daily Mass at least once a week for probably a full year prior. Last summer, I went just about every day, without being officially Catholic.

Go for it! It'll make the day you can actually receive Him in the Eucharist that much sweeter!

Grace and Peace,
Erica


#3

[quote=Student09;5998942
]

Answers (to the best of my knowledge):

  1. ABSOLUTELY! Anyone can go to Mass. However, just like at Sunday Mass, you won’t be able to receive communion. If God is tugging on your heart, don’t ignore Him :slight_smile:

  2. I’m a cradle Catholic, but my family didn’t start going to daily mass until I was 15 (I didn’t know it existed, believe it or not). At our local parish, Confession is after Mass, so there have been times when I couldn’t receive at Mass, but still went.

  3. Yes, daily Mass is usually shorter than Sunday Mass (about 1/2 hour long) for several reasons. a) fewer people attend, so communion lines are shorter. b) There usually isn’t music. c) The homily is shorter. (Answer to your last two questions in a roundabout way.)

Hope this helps! I’m so glad you’re doing RCIA! :thumbsup:I’d love it if everybody in the world became Catholic, because it’s the most fabulous thing ever!!!
[/quote]


#4

You can go to daily mass in exactly the same way you can go to Sunday mass:D

It's far shorter... no second reading, sometimes no sign of peace, sometimes more informal music(depending on the size of the parish), and often no homily. It's really short, but just as beautiful as Sunday mass:)

Way to go!! Can't wait for you to be part of the Church!


#5
  1. Go!
  2. I am sure that RCIA folks go. This shouldn’t be a concern.
  3. You will find that you will be so inspired by those with you at daily Mass. We are a different breed. When a few people get together & pray, there are fewer distractions & a real sense of purpose in Mass comes somewhat closer. The center is the Eucharist & you will really feel it. Just think of the joy you will feel when you are baptized/confirmed & then are able to recieve Him. Chances are, you’ll be able to talk to the priest & he will so happy to see you there! I encourge you to let the priest know what’s going on. He can be an extra source of affirmation.

There is typically no music. Sometimes an opening and/or closing hymn. It depends on the traditions of the church. And, depending on the priest, there could be a full 20 minute homily or a 3 minute reflection. It depends on the needs of the congregation. For instance if you go to a noon Mass for business type people, the priests keep it to under 10 minutes. Same for early morning Masses. Evening Mass could run a tad longer, but rarely. These are very holy times at daily Mass. Let us all know how it goes if you choose to go.


#6

I love your enthusiasm! About 8 years ago I used to do an hour of walking early in the morning. It became a "must do". Then, I realized I hadn't put God on my "must do" schedule so I split my time. I walk for the first half hour and then I spend the second half hour at daily mass. I look forward to the daily mass. I recommend subscribing to "Magnificat" I won't do a commercial for Magnificat but if you are interested you can find it at www.magnificat.com Most churches don't have the daily readings in the prayer books they provide. The Magnificat has all the readings you need for mass each day. I love reading all the bible stories. Those of us who go to daily mass read a lot more of the bible then the Sunday only attendees.


#7

Another difference... at daily Mass, there tends to be only one reading and a Gospel, versus two and a Gospel on Sunday.


#8

I attended daily Mass for almost two years before mustering up the courage to begin RCIA. I think you will find it a tremendous blessing. When you attend daily Mass you will become more attuned to the Liturgical Year since you will be going through all the readings, rather than just the Sunday readings.

I will be praying for you as you journey toward the Church. I think you will find that the more effort you put into worship (attending daily Mass, Eucharistic Adoration, praying the Divine Office, etc.), the more blessings and graces you will enjoy. They will multiply exponentially. I pray that you will receive many blessings during your walk with God “pressed down, shaken together and overflowing” (Luke 6:38).


#9

You should most definitely go! I am in RCIA as well, and I WISH I could go to daily Mass, but I work and it’s only in the mornings, so if you have the opportunity take advantage of it! I also wish my church was open 24/7 like some still are in the big cities for people to come pray whenever, but it’s not. If it were though, I’d be going to pray every day after work. I don’t really think it’s possible to overdo going to Mass. :smiley:


#10

Yes, go to daily Mass whenever possible. It will be a source of strength for you as you go about the rest of your day. And since you cannot yet receive the eucharist, you can take that time during Mass to pray for a spiritual communion (as composed by St. Alphonsus Liguori):

My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the most Blessed Sacrament. I love You above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul. Since I cannot now receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as if You have already come, and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You. Amen.

May God continue to bless your journey!


#11

Thank you everyone for your replies. I will try to go tomorrow.


#12

[quote="Student09, post:1, topic:178063"]
So I have some questions.
1) Is it alright for me to go?
2) Did any of you who converted ever go to daily mass before converting? I mean before you were able to receive the Eucharist.
3) What is it like? Is it shorter than the mass on Sunday? Is there music? A homily?

[/quote]

It is absolutely all right for you to go to Mass.

I'm an RCIA director. Two of the candidates who were recently received into the Church went to daily Mass for months before they could receive communion. I thought it was wonderful and clearly the Holy Spirit moving in their lives.

One of them described to me what happened on the Monday after they had received their First Communion and Confirmation. She could finally receive the Eucharist and everyone in the chapel knew it. After Mass she received hugs and prayers and congratulations. The whole daily Mass community celebrated with her.


#13

[quote="Student09, post:11, topic:178063"]
Thank you everyone for your replies. I will try to go tomorrow.

[/quote]

Great:D

You'll definitely start to wonder why more people don't go. I think their preconceptions of it are far different than it is (oh, it's so long, oh, I don't have time...):rolleyes:


#14

Yes, I went to daily Mass (not every single day, but 3 or 4 times a week) off and on for years before I began RCIA - and also after I started RCIA. It made a HUGE difference in my conversion! Plus I got to know the other parishioners better at daily Mass and they got to know me.

Oddly, no other RCIA candidate or catechumen in my RCIA class ever attended, even though I often mentioned in class how wonderful daily Mass is. Same for my husband’s class this past year. Strange.


#15

another reason is that in the catechumenate your nourishment is the Word of God and daily Mass will also keep you immersed in the readings, as well as intensify your hunger and thirst for the Lord.


#16

The priest may aso skip the daily homily. My priest skips the daily homily 2/5 days on average.


#17

I went to Mass today! It was wonderful. I’m so glad I went. Thank you all for encouraging me!


#18

[quote="Student09, post:17, topic:178063"]
I went to Mass today! It was wonderful. I'm so glad I went. Thank you all for encouraging me!

[/quote]

That's great! Our pleasure.


#19

Student09, I’m also in RCIA and go to daily mass whenever I can. Usually that’s two or three days a week. I felt a bit hesitant at first also, wondering if people would think it odd to see a catachumen. But the daily mass crew (it’s always the same people) have been welcoming and happy to see me, and helpful answering my Catholocism 101 questions. We have a small group that prays the Rosary together before the daily mass, which is an extra treat.

Seven days between masses is just too long for me.


#20

I'm in RCIA and I try to go to a weekday Mass when I can (usually works out at one per week). In fact, our fortnightly RCIA meeting is after Mass on Thursdays, so most of our group is usually in attendance.

I do love the Mass on Sunday, of course, but the weekday Masses have a different quality to them which I quite like. They're quiet and reflective, and noone is ever in a rush to be anywhere else. I also usually end up at the Mass which is preceded by exposition - obviously I can't participate in the sacraments yet, and this time is special to me for that very reason.


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