Dalai Lama to lead US Senate prayers


#1

news.yahoo.com/dalai-lama-lead-us-senate-prayers-185507622.html

Washington (AFP) - The Dalai Lama will lead the US Senate in prayer on Thursday as the exiled Tibetan spiritual leader meets leaders of Congress, his office said.

Hmm…


#2

Cool.
He’s a nice man.

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#3

Clearly the majority Christian senate is persecuting the majority Christian senate to serve the majority Christian senate’s anti-Christian agenda.


#4

I wish it were a Catholic leading the prayers but I do have respect for the Dalai Lama although I disagree with his religion.


#5

Would you have the same reaction if it was another religious leader? Is it normal for religious leaders to lead the Senate in prayer? Here in Canada there would be an uproar if any religious leader attempted to lead Parliament in prayer…separation of Church and State is taken very seriously.


#6

In America Congress can allow prayers to be made by anyone. A prayer is said every day by someone at the opening of the House and Senate.


#7

I like the Dalai Lama, his approach to the virtues of compassion and respect are quite noble.

Oh Yeah Fr Patrick Conroy is the chaplain for the House

youtube.com/watch?v=c2ho5aWt4Cc&feature=player_detailpage#t=0


#8

Both the Senate and the House open with daily prayer. I had no luck finding them on the senate website, but I did on the House site.

senate.gov/reference/Sessions/Traditions/Chaplains_Prayer.htm Mostly Protestant, but one Catholic chaplain back in 1833.

forbes.house.gov/prayercaucus/prayerincongress.aspx First link at the top gives you the prayer of the day. Now it shows the prayer from March 5, given by a Jesuit, The Reverend Patrick J. Conroy, the current Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives. :slight_smile: I see that he doesn’t mention Jesus, but God. Fair enough. He also mentioned Ukraine and Venezuela.

Dear Lord, we give You thanks for giving us another day.

We use this moment to be reminded of Your presence and to tap the resources needed by the Members of this people’s House to do their work as well as it can be done.

As the world observes the tensions mounting within Ukraine and Venezuela, may we all note well the crippling effects of ideological divides when a shared sense of national unity might bring greater hope and possible solution to serious political problems.

Send, O God, Your healing grace upon those torn nations and upon the Members of this assembly who struggle to see the shared hope for a better future in those with whom they disagree.

All this day and through the week, may our Representatives do their best to find solutions to pressing issues facing our Nation. Please hasten the day when justice and love shall dwell in the hearts of all peoples and rule the affairs of the nations of Earth.

May all that is done this day be for Your greater honor and glory.

Amen.


#9

That’s wonderful. Canada has sadly long since renounced all presence of religion in the public sphere. Parliament phased out the prayer before each session years ago to appear liberals and atheists. I’ve noticed that American presidents of either party constantly say such things as “God bless America”. If Prime Minister Harper mentioned God in any context there would be an uproar beyond imagining… “God bless Canada” - you will never hear those words from a sitting prime minister. Sad but true. On the other hand, the Queen is still technically our Chief of State and I am always happy to hear her reference Christ and even the true meaning of Christmas during her annual Christmas Address.


#10

It depends who it is.
I’ve met the Dalai Lama and talked with him and he was very kind, compassionate, and endearing.
Which is why I said, “Cool. He’s a nice man.”

I’m Canadian, fyi. Born and bred.

Don’t Americans have an entire history of inviting religious leaders like Bishops and the Billy Graham types to lead in prayers?

I’m all for separation of Church and State. Somehow, the Dalai Lama doesn’t feel…church-like to me. What he talks about is very “inclusive” of all people and beliefs and comes across more as a general spirituality and goodness. Which is why I like 'em.

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#11

I don’t get it - “leader US Senate prayers to what?”

Tibetan Buddhism is agnostic or disregarding of a divine being at best. It seems strange that the religious leader of this group would be leading prayers to God.


#12

Cool. I don’t care who does it because we’re a country with religious freedom and I thank God for that.


#13

Ahhh yes, the church of self-esteem


#14

I’m confused…I thought we were talking about the United States of America ???


#15

I mean, in the sense that we don’t have a state religion or one faith taking all legal precedence over the others here.


#16

Well, I think the Dalai Lama’s vague spirituality is meant not to offend anybody. For example, he has clearly said in the past the homosexual acts were wrong, but now last week, he’s suddenly announced he’s okay with it.

I don’t have a problem with him saying the prayers though. I think the people praying should roughly correspond to the religious groups represented in the States, which would mean mostly Protestants and Catholics, and every now and then a Muslim or a Buddhist or a Hindu. Having read the prayer of the Jesuit priest, it appears that all the prayers have to be sanitised so as to be so generic that it doesn’t really matter who says them.:shrug:


#17

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