Dan Brown’s America - “The Da Vinci Code” and “Angels and Demons”

This explains why both “The Da Vinci Code” and “Angels and Demons” end with a big anti-Catholic reveal (Jesus had kids with Mary Magdalene! That terrorist plot against the Vatican was actually launched by an archconservative priest!) followed by a big cover-up. A small elect (Tom Hanks and company, in the movies) gets to know what really happened, but the mass of believers remain in the dark, lest their spiritual questing be derailed by disillusionment and scandal. Having dismissed Catholicism’s truth claims and demonized its most sincere defenders, Brown pats believers on the head and bids them go on fingering their rosary beads.

In the Brownian worldview, all religions — even Roman Catholicism — have the potential to be wonderful, so long as we can get over the idea that any one of them might be particularly true. It’s a message perfectly tailored for 21st-century America, where the most important religious trend is neither swelling unbelief nor rising fundamentalism, but the emergence of a generalized “religiousness” detached from the claims of any specific faith tradition. …

But the success of this message — which also shows up in the work of Brown’s many thriller-writing imitators — can’t be separated from its dishonesty. The “secret” history of Christendom that unspools in “The Da Vinci Code” is false from start to finish. The lost gospels are real enough, but they neither confirm the portrait of Christ that Brown is peddling — they’re far, far weirder than that — nor provide a persuasive alternative to the New Testament account. The Jesus of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John — jealous, demanding, apocalyptic — may not be congenial to contemporary sensibilities, but he’s the only historically-plausible Jesus there is.

For millions of readers, Brown’s novels have helped smooth over the tension between ancient Christianity and modern American faith. But the tension endures. You can have Jesus or Dan Brown. But you can’t have both.

nytimes.com/2009/05/19/opinion/19douthat.html?_r=2

but the emergence of a generalized “religiousness” detached from the claims of any specific faith tradition. …

That’s the money quote, and I think a significant one. Generalized “religiousness”, in my opinion, reduces the dignity of man to, say, blue-green algae. By removing any discernment of one Truth revealed through One God, man makes his soul servile to transient popular interpretations of the subordinate Natural Law, which is even less credible than the adherence of blue-green algae to the impervious laws of nature.

Heck, even savages that follow the Natural Law would argue against a plurality of truths. The upshot being that civilized man is in the process of falling spiritually below the common savage,

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