Daughter's World History class is showing the movie "Luther"


#1

So after homeschooling our daughter through 8th our daughter is now in high school. We got a permission slip home today because her teacher will be showing the movie Luther (2003) in class. If I had known this was coming I would have viewed it first before making a decision but since I don't have time to do that now I'm pretty sure I am not giving my permission. All the reviews I've read so far see to be that the Church is portrayed as the villain and Luther as the hero. Has anyone seen this movie that could give me some further information about it?


#2

Well, here's what one person got out of it:

faithontheearth.com/HTMLobj-490/Luther.pdf


#3

I own it, it's on my list to see.I haven't seen it yet. I've heard about it though.

It seems pretty sensationalized, probably not historically accurate-and it was made and financed by Lutherans-that doesn't make it morally wrong, of course, but it probably does make it not 100% Catholic!

Imdb or Wikipedia it for more information, maybe...?


#4

I would suppose, as a parent, I would be equally concerned. However, considering your daughter was bright enough to make it into high school, I would think she has the ability to scrutinize. Propose such to her!

For example, ask her to criticize the movie - find inaccuracies, opinions, and couple it with the facts that are accurate. As a member of the human race, we sometimes forget that people exist that have different opinions and viewpoints, and as catholic parents, it is important for us to take the opportunity to show our children that we can maintain our catholic beliefs, in spite of the different, and confrontational, opinions about our faith.

But, I would also rent the movie and watch it and use it as a chance to engage in your child's academics with her.

Good luck!


#5

[quote="rayne89, post:1, topic:188340"]
So after homeschooling our daughter through 8th our daughter is now in high school. We got a permission slip home today because her teacher will be showing the movie Luther (2003) in class. If I had known this was coming I would have viewed it first before making a decision but since I don't have time to do that now I'm pretty sure I am not giving my permission. All the reviews I've read so far see to be that the Church is portrayed as the villain and Luther as the hero. Has anyone seen this movie that could give me some further information about it?

[/quote]

It should be OK to watch provided that the class is allowed to question it and discuss the possible historical inaccuracies in it. If the teacher happens to be a Lutheran, then you have a problem. Perhaps your daughter could suggest that the class also watch "The Man for All Seasons" and see what the teacher says.


#6

Fact: Luther had a beef with the Church

Fact: there were some ligitimate things wrong in the church.

If you can rent the movie beforehand. Luther himself wasn’t a bad guy. He had some really good points about things the church wasn’t doing right. I think, on many points, he wsa driven by the Holy Spirit. However, he approached it the wrong way and didn’t submit to authority…which WAS a sin.

But in my opinion his life can give some valuable lessons, so long as you enforce what he did right and wrong.


#7

Have her watch it and learn how to critique it. Earlier posts about your daughter show her to be a bright, independent young woman who is strong in her faith. I think this would be a good lesson in discernment for her.


#8

I've seen it and I would have no issue with my (hypothetical) daughter watching it. From what I could tell it was fairly historically accurate, and yes, the Church is portrayed as the villain, but the Church at that time did have some pretty villainous aspects to it. I, as a practicing Catholic, wouldn't call the portrayal unfair.


#9

I think her teacher is missing a chance here. There is an incredible documentary on Luther than was shown on PBS that highlights the split but also highlights what Luther's actions brought about in the world of politics, education, linguistics, government, etc. I think that would be much more in line with a history class.


#10

You should read some of the writings of St Thomas More and Erasmus that dealt with their contemporary, Martin Luther. Given the intellectual debates that he took part in with them, among others, Luther knew full well that the course he chose was not the only alternative.


#11

I can’t say for sure the teacher is Lutheran but my daughter said he has been making very positive remarks about Luther over their last several class discussions and and stressing the negatives of the Church.


#12

Again, I said that I believe the Holy Spirit moved Luther to see some of the things that he did. However, I believe that Luther did not follow through on what God had planned for him.

Fact is that the Catholic church messed up. We should feel angry that the church got so off course and hurt our brethren in the past.

You should give her the support both intellectually and emotionally to deal with the church’s sins.


#13

Well, it’s a history class and the teacher may have valid historical points. It’s probably easy for any of us to look at the issue through the lens of our faith and become defensive. If the teacher kept criticizing the church in a political science or social studies class that would be different.


#14

Can I reccomend the review by apologist Dave Amrstrong. He notes some good points about the film but also points out its many weaknesses.

socrates58.blogspot.com/2004/05/catholic-response-to-movie-luther-2003.html


#15

Here's another Catholic Review-

decentfilms.com/articles/luther.html


#16

To be honest, I think that not allowing her to watch the video would be helicopter parenting. :confused:

Up until high school, I rarely recall people challenging my faith. Let your daughter be independent. I’m around the same age as your daughter and in all honestly, the times when I especially grow in my faith are the times where I learn how to validly defend the opinions and beliefs of the Catholic Church. Not in a specifically defensive manner, of course, just in one that helps others learn more about why such views exist. By allowing her to view the video I think that she would gain the opportunity to grow deeper into her faith.

Of course, this is all assuming that the teacher is presenting this lesson in a suitable unbiased manner.


#17

Saint Thomas and Erasmus spoke up about indulgences before Luther did. And their influential writings did spark a real debate. One cannot say with any certainty that it was not enough, because Luther’s drastic actions preempted whatever solution may have come from it.

And I would not say the Church messed up. I would say men in the Church did!


#18

I'd say let her watch it. Perhaps rent it for yourself so you can make a discussion out of it.

I'm assuming this is not a Catholic high school?

In either case, when and if she goes off to college, she's going to see things like this. It's just the way it is. Now is a good time for her to learn about other faiths and how to defend herself and realize why her faith is important. I think sometimes it's easy for our youth to take their faith for granted. I know I did, although at the time I was Lutheran.

And in college, I had this Native American History teacher who was very anti-Catholic and religion. I could kind of understand where he was coming from since many Native Americans were forced into religion and things, but being strong in my faith allowed me not to take what he said to heart.

So I'd say it could be a good learning experience for her for life.


#19

[quote="1ke, post:2, topic:188340"]
Well, here's what one person got out of it:

faithontheearth.com/HTMLobj-490/Luther.pdf

[/quote]

Based on that review it sounds like the movie should be banned as hate speach and slander.


#20

I would not be so worried about your daughter watching it as the fact that other students are watching it.

There is a lot of anti church hatred out there and it is likely that showing this film in class will only full the fires of that hate.
Have you considered contacting the ACLU and questioning why the school is promoting protestanism and providing protestant propaganda to the students?

Also prepare your daughter with answers to the issues and false accusations that will be likely raised. Arm her with the truth.

You may want to also remind her that there were some bad apples in the Christian Church before the protestants came along. After the protestant church came along we were able to purge many of those bad apples. Remember that Priests, Bishops and Popes have taken vows of poverty but Protestant ministers are getting rich off their congregation.

You may also want to look into why they did not give you more notice. Seems like they are trying to pull a quick one.


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