DBT


#1

Hi,
I posted already about Buddhist Meditation, but I'd like to post specifically about DBT, which contains "Mindfulness".
Does anybody know of a way in which I can obtain "An Official Church Document" stating that DBT goes against the Catholic Church?
I already pm'd one of the Apologists but they're very busy. I need something official. An Apologist's comment would be enough. But I'm not looking for people's general opinion on DBT, I'm looking for the Church's view on DBT.
Thank you


#2

I think there is nothing wrong with Christian mindfulness. See this link -
carmelnet.org/larkin/larkin017.pdf
Written by a Carmelite Friar.


#3

Thank you, that’s a great link, however, DBT DOES NOT offer Christian Mindfulness, it’s Buddhist Mindfulness


#4

ewtn.com/library/CURIA/CDFMED.HTM

jloughnan.tripod.com/orient.htm


#5

Thank you Tricia,
That is a really good link, however it doesn’t specifically address DBT itself. I need to know, precisely whether or not DBT is compatible with Catholicism. Thank you


#6

:confused:


#7

[quote="EmilyCatholic, post:5, topic:299504"]
Thank you Tricia,
That is a really good link, however it doesn't specifically address DBT itself. I need to know, precisely whether or not DBT is compatible with Catholicism. Thank you

[/quote]

I highly doubt anyone is going to find anything that mentions DBT by name - there are simply too many such practices being used and developed for anyone to have time to mention each one by name.

A brief google search on the topic says that it is a type of therapy derived from Buddhist practices rather than simply being Buddhist meditation.

Which to me is like saying Christmas trees are DERIVED FROM the old Germanic pagan custom of decorating trees as part of nature worship (they are, and St Boniface made no bones about the fact that he was Christianising the pagan custom when he invented the idea) rather than BEING nature worship. Hence nothing wrong with DBT.

If you really want to be clear, the best thing is simply to ask your priest.


#8

[quote="LilyM, post:7, topic:299504"]
I highly doubt anyone is going to find anything that mentions DBT by name - there are simply too many such practices being used and developed for anyone to have time to mention each one by name.

A brief google search on the topic says that it is a type of therapy derived from Buddhist practices rather than simply being Buddhist meditation.

Which to me is like saying Christmas trees are DERIVED FROM the old Germanic pagan custom of decorating trees as part of nature worship (they are, and St Boniface made no bones about the fact that he was Christianising the pagan custom when he invented the idea) rather than BEING nature worship. Hence nothing wrong with DBT.

If you really want to be clear, the best thing is simply to ask your priest.

[/quote]

Unless the priest is a clinician or psychologist, his take on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy may be lacking.:shrug:


#9

[quote="Publisher, post:8, topic:299504"]
Unless the priest is a clinician or psychologist, his take on Dialectical Behavioral Therapy may be lacking.:shrug:

[/quote]

Since the poster is looking for something which mentions it by name, an indepth understanding of the concept is unnecessary. A priest will have more thorough knowledge of Church documents than most laypeople, and so is more likely to know whether the practice is mentioned anywhere by name, even if he doesn't have a clinician's or psychologist's understanding of what it is.


#10

Thanks for the replies. No I don't think I'm going to get what I'm looking for, but it's ok, I've tried my best, and that's all I can do.


#11

[quote="EmilyCatholic, post:3, topic:299504"]
Thank you, that's a great link, however, DBT DOES NOT offer Christian Mindfulness, it's Buddhist Mindfulness

[/quote]

With the wealth of Catholic spiritual practices and meditations available--may I ask why you want to pursue Buddhist Mindfulness? What is it you believe you will gain that you can't find in a Catholic practice? In my experience even if you can find a practice that isn't against Catholic teaching and could be used--these often serve as a gateway which leads people to practices and thoughts that are indeed contrary to Catholicism--even to great minds.

Peace,
Mark


#12

"28. Some physical exercises automatically produce a feeling of quiet and relaxation, pleasing sensations, perhaps even phenomena of light and of warmth, which resemble spiritual well-being. To take such feelings for the authentic consolations of the Holy Spirit would be a totally erroneous way of conceiving the spiritual life. Giving them a symbolic significance typical of the mystical experience, when the moral condition of the person concerned does not correspond to such an experience, would represent a kind of mental schizophrenia which could also lead to psychic disturbance and, at times, to moral deviations.

That does not mean that genuine practices of meditation which come from the Christian East and from the great non-Christian religions, which prove attractive to the man of today who is divided and disoriented, cannot constitute a suitable means of helping the person who prays to come before God with an interior peace, even in the midst of external pressures.'

In short, while not explicitly saying it's wrong, this article does warn against the possibility of deviation. Also any type of therapy should not replace a strong spiritual life. Talk to the therapist and ask more about the method or to simply use cognitive behavioral approach in lieu of the potentially new-agy method. Talking to a spiritual director might be really helpful. By now maybe you have tried it? Anything you learned- was it new age? God bless you and heal you.


#13

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