December 8 holy day


#1

Does attending one mass on Saturday evening cover my obligation for the holy day of obligation and Sundays obligation? I dont understand why people are saying I have to go twice (not that I have an issue with it).


#2

It does not. Each day requires attendance at Mass – so you have to go twice. You could go to the Vigil Mass on Friday night for the holy day, and then go Saturday night for Sunday.


#3

Why is that? Im curious now.


#4

Because they are separate celebrations – one is the feast of the Immaculate Conception, which is never abrogated in the U.S.; and one is Sunday. They do not occur on the same day, so they are not celebrated together.


#5

You must go twice because there are two obligations to fulfill. You can either go on Friday evening or anytime on Saturday to fulfill the obligation for 8 December, and then either Saturday evening or anytime on Sunday to fulfill the Sunday obligation. It’s a little bit like having to pay both state and federal taxes. Two sets of taxes, two payments. Two obligations, two actions to fulfill them.

And the readings or texts of the Mass do not matter. The law simply says you must attend Mass on the day of precept or the evening of the previous day. If you sat in the pews for two back to back Masses on Saturday evening, you’d have fulfilled the obligation for both days, even if both were Sunday anticipated Masses.

-Fr ACEGC


#6

No.

Two distinct obligations = two distinct masses.

You need to go once for IC on Friday evening or Saturday and once for 2nd Sunday of Advent on Saturday evening or Sunday.


#7

In the US, no 2-4-1 with Immaculate Conception.

We are celebrating both Mary and Christ, each is worthy of us attending a separate mass.


#8

I WISH I could attend both masses. Drill weekend, probably gonna have to get a dispensation. :disappointed:


#9

We just had a very long thread on this exact subject

https://forums.catholic.com/t/no-double-dipping-on-the-feast-of-the-immaculate-conception-dec-8/


#10

Next year, Dec 8,2019 - the obligation is lifted as it falls on a Sunday. The Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception will be celebrated on Dec 9,2019 and the feast of San Juan Diego will be suppressed.
http://www.usccb.org/about/divine-worship/liturgical-calendar/upload/2019cal.pdf


#11

That’s not actually lifting the obligation; it’s transferring the feast.


#12

FYI -
image


#13

Yes, exactly.


#14

You have to go to two separate masses and here is why in really simple terms:

Saturday vigil for Sunday’s mass doesn’t count for Sunday if its a 1pm mass or something because that is still Saturday. It does not count until usually (depending on the Diocese) 4pm, my diocese the earliest Vigil is 4pm but most are 4:30 or 5pm. The reason being is in old Hebrew days, 5pm and after was considered Sundown and after Sundown it was considered a new day, thus Saturday vigil is suppose to be around sundown to count for Sunday.

The same is the case for this Holy Day. In order for the Holy Day obligation to be fulfilled you can’t go at like 9pm, that is way past sundown and would then count for Sunday. So you have to go anytime from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday so basically 4pm Friday to 4pm Saturday because by 5pm (like I said based on the Diocese) then it counts for Sunday not the Holy Day.

I myself am going to a 4pm Vigil on Friday for the Holy Day and then Sunday mass at 11am.

Come Holy Spirit, kindle the hearts of your faithful and you will renew the face of the Earth,

  • Matt

#15

@GospelOfMatthew
This is NOT accurate information. Please reread the thread carefully, as the correct information has been given prior.

You have two obligations: the Immaculate Conception and the Second Sunday of Advent.

Immaculate Conception Mass may be anytime Friday evening through the end (midnight) of Saturday.

Sunday Mass may be anytime from Saturday evening through the end (midnight) of Sunday.

You can’t go to one Mass for two obligations.

The whole thing about Hebrew sundown time observance is nice, but it’s not applicable here. We’re permitted the evening before because Canon Law says obligations may be met on the calendar day or the evening before, and evening is universally defined as Vespers. The Bishop may attempt to set the time for the earliest possible celebration of Vespers, but that’s been debated here often as to whether he has that leeway in Canon Law or not - or the time is to be understood universally as 4pm.


#16

This is NOT correct. The anticipated, or vigil, mass has nothing to do with sundown.

Again, not correct.

Sunday is from midnight to midnight. One may fulfill the obligation on the day (midnight to midnight) or the evening before (4 p.m. onward).


#17

Thanks to both of you for the corrections - so the Hebrew sundown applies to Vigil masses for Sunday but not Holy Days?


#18

There’s no mass that “combines” two separate occasions - even if one of those occasions is an Ordinary Time Sunday mass.


#19

No. The Hebrew sundown has nothing to do with anything, and doesn’t apply to Sundays or Holy Days.

For Sundays and Holy Days of Obligation, we may fulfill the precept by attending any Mass in any Catholic Rite on the day of the precept (midnight to midnight) or the evening before (4 p.m. to midnight).


#20

Good article (2012 Dec 8 fell on Saturday as it does this year)


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