Decision on Baptisms: does this affect Holy Communion?


#1

A very dear Episcopalian friend of mine is wondering if the information in the link below will have anything to do with non-Catholics being able to participate in Catholic Holy Communion. Can you help me answer her please?

I would think this has only to do with baptism, in the instance that if someone wants to convert to the Catholic faith, his or her baptism would be accepted. Many baptisms are accepted, but the link below seems to be expanding this. I just don't see that this has to do with Holy Communion between Protestants and Catholics. Thank you very much for any help on this you can give me.

I'm very glad about our Holy Father's reaching out to our Anglican and Episcopalians through the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. I just want to make sure I have the correct understanding whenever someone asks me an ecumenical question.

huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/29/catholic-protestant-baptism-recognize_n_2575915.html?utm_hp_ref=fb&src=sp&comm_ref=false


#2

[quote="Kathryn_Ann, post:1, topic:313201"]
An Episcopalian friend of mine is wondering if the information in the link below will have anything to do with non-Catholics being able to participate in Catholic Holy Communion.

[/quote]

No.

[quote="Kathryn_Ann, post:1, topic:313201"]

Can you help me answer her please? I would think this has only to do with baptism, in the instance that if someone wants to convert to the Catholic faith, his or her baptism would be accepted. Many baptisms are accepted, but the link below seems to be expanding this.

[/quote]

Correct. Except this document is not expanding on anything. The Catholic Church has accepted baptism of various schismatic or heretical groups since the 2nd century. What has been a complication in recent years, compared to the historical churches, is that some non-Catholic groups have started using terms that invalidate the baptism-- replacing Father, Son, and Holy Spirit with other words. This agreement basically is saying that these particular non-Catholic ecclesial communions affirm their use of the correct formula in baptism.

Yes, from the Catholic Church's perspective this would come in to play in the case of a convert. Also in marriage, permission is needed to marry a validly baptized person while a dispensation is needed for the unbaptized.

[quote="Kathryn_Ann, post:1, topic:313201"]

I just don't see that this has to do with Holy Communion between Protestants and Catholics. Thank you very much for any help on this you can give me.

[/quote]

You are correct. It does not.

It is a terribly written article.


#3

[quote="1ke, post:2, topic:313201"]
No.

Correct. Except this document is not expanding on anything. The Catholic Church has accepted baptism of various schismatic or heretical groups since the 2nd century. What has been a complication in recent years, compared to the historical churches, is that some non-Catholic groups have started using terms that invalidate the baptism-- replacing Father, Son, and Holy Spirit with other words. This agreement basically is saying that these particular non-Catholic ecclesial communions affirm their use of the correct formula in baptism.

Yes, from the Catholic Church's perspective this would come in to play in the case of a convert. Also in marriage, permission is needed to marry a validly baptized person while a dispensation is needed for the unbaptized.

You are correct. It does not.

It is a terribly written article.

[/quote]

Oh, thank you so much, 1ke, as I was just sent several messages from people saying this is all about letting all Protestants and Catholics participate in Catholic Holy Communion. I answered back a preliminary answer, that many baptisms ARE already accepted for those going through RCIA, for example, but that this article is not speaking, from what I see, about Holy Communion whatsoever.

I'm afraid the article might mislead people and I am very grateful for your quick and complete response. If I see any other such mis-understandings I can also mention what you said about marriage as well. I had not thought of that. It's important to me, and to all Catholics that people understand what is unique, Holy and historic about Catholic Holy Communion. This article speaks to a separate issue.

Thank you very much,
Kathryn Ann


#4

You should ask your friends why they are getting their news about Christianity from the atheistic Huffington Post. It is just a rhetorical question, they cannot have any good reason. They need to decide if they are Christian or not.


#5

[quote="PaulfromIowa, post:4, topic:313201"]
You should ask your friends why they are getting their news about Christianity from the atheistic Huffington Post. It is just a rhetorical question, they cannot have any good reason. They need to decide if they are Christian or not.

[/quote]

Hi PaulfromIowa, I'm not familiar with that particular paper at all. I saw someone quoting the article, and was intrigued when they seemed to link it to something about Holy Communion being "opened up" to protestants! After reading it through, I couldn't see any mention of Holy Communion. I've seen a few people jumping to conclusions about this, so I was really concerned to have the right response. The truth matters. :angel1:


#6

[quote="Kathryn_Ann, post:5, topic:313201"]
Hi PaulfromIowa, I'm not familiar with that particular paper at all. I saw someone quoting the article, and was intrigued when they seemed to link it to something about Holy Communion being "opened up" to protestants! After reading it through, I couldn't see any mention of Holy Communion. I've seen a few people jumping to conclusions about this, so I was really concerned to have the right response. The truth matters. :angel1:

[/quote]

Ecclesia de Eucharistia explains why non-Catholics may not participate in Communion.


#7

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