Definition/Words Magisterium


#1

When we say that Catholics believe in the teaching of the Catholic Church, is it the same as saying we believe the Magisterium and the Pope? Can we use these words to mean the same thing ?

Also, is there any place that documents actual changes in our faith?


#2

[quote=emom]When we say that Catholics believe in the teaching of the Catholic Church, is it the same as saying we believe the Magisterium and the Pope? Can we use these words to mean the same thing ?

Also, is there any place that documents actual changes in our faith?
[/quote]

No we cannot say that. The reason why we cannot is because it is not intellectually honest. Our trust in the Magisterium of the Church is a part believing in the teachings of the Church. Our belief is in Christ and in the Sacra Doctrina that he imparted to the Church. The role of the Magisterium is to gain ever deeper understanding of that Sacra Doctrina.


#3

For what it’s worth, Magesterium is not a “body” but the actual teaching authority of the Church:

Magisterium (Lat. magister, a master):
The Church’s divinely appointed authority to teach the truths of religion

While in many practical ways the term is used as if it was some group of people, this is not technically true and sometimes leads to confusion.

Just a “for what it’s worth” comment. We will now proceed with your previously scheduled discussion, already in progress. :slight_smile:


#4

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