Democratic Governor: Health Law 'No Longer Affordable'


#1

Minnesota’s Democratic governor said Wednesday that the Affordable Care Act is “no longer affordable,” a stinging critique from a state leader who strongly embraced the law and proudly proclaimed health reform was working in Minnesota just a few years ago.

Gov. Mark Dayton made the comments while addressing questions about Minnesota’s fragile health insurance market, where individual plans are facing double-digit increases after all insurers threatened to exit the market entirely in 2017. He’s the only Democratic governor to publicly suggest the law isn’t working as intended.

Dayton’s comments follow former President Bill Clinton’s saying last week that the law was “the craziest thing in the world” before he backtracked.

abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/democratic-governor-health-law-longer-affordable-42755115


#2

I’m pretty sure that means it’s working as intended. You were never going to convince a majority of Americans to surrender all their health care decisions to the government while you had a private health care market that worked for the vast majority of people.


#3

The opening argument in the quest to socialize the health care industry, That way we can all enjoy the quality health care of the VA.


#4

Obamacare was always intended to fail. But the marxist architects of the law didn’t think it would fail this quickly.

Of course all of this was predicted by conservatives when the law was being forced upon the country.


#5

The un-affordability of our health care system is only going to get worse. Personally my insurance costs have tripled from a couple years ago. My deductible is sky high too. Basically I do not have usable health insurance.

To make matters worse, recently I was notified that my insurance company is leaving the health insurance market. I’ll need to find new insurance soon. It will undoubtably be more expensive.

Politicians, health care officials and regulators are not serious about trying to lower health care costs. If we want health costs to be more affordable Americans need to be more critical of our health care system.

Personally I believe there is a good amount of little needed health costs being incurred. As an example one of the creators of the newer health care law, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel frequently mentions that people should stop having an annual health check up.

I agree. I stopped having an annual doctors visit.

The annual check up hasn’t been found to improve or lengthen people’s lives. Some on that can be read here:

Skip Your Annual Physical

nytimes.com/2015/01/09/opinion/skip-your-annual-physical.html?_r=0

excerpt:

"WE all make resolutions and promises to live healthier and better lives, to make the world a better place. Not having my annual physical is one small way I can help reduce health care costs — and save myself time, worry and a worthless exam.

Around 45 million Americans are likely to have a routine physical this year — just as they have for many years running. A poke here, a listen there, a few tubes of blood, maybe an X-ray, a few reassuring words about diet, exercise and not smoking from the doctor, all just to be sure everything is in good working order. Most think of it as the human equivalent of a 15,000-mile checkup and fluid change, which can uncover hidden problems and ensure longer engine life.

There is only one problem: From a health perspective, the annual physical exam is basically worthless.

In 2012, the Cochrane Collaboration, an international group of medical researchers who systematically review the world’s biomedical research, analyzed 14 randomized controlled trials with over 182,000 people followed for a median of nine years that sought to evaluate the benefits of routine, general health checkups — that is, visits to the physician for general health and not prompted by any particular symptom or complaint.

The unequivocal conclusion: the appointments are unlikely to be beneficial. Regardless of which screenings and tests were administered, studies of annual health exams dating from 1963 to 1999 show that the annual physicals did not reduce mortality overall or for specific causes of death from cancer or heart disease. And the checkups consume billions, although no one is sure exactly how many billions because of the challenge of measuring the additional screenings and follow-up tests…"


#6

Yeah, and their cure for the government created problems will be more government intervention.


#7

Those who can’t afford it will drop it. A bad Socialist idea.

Ed


#8

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