Did Galileo take a vow of obedience as part of a religious order?


#1

Hi,

Did Galileo take a vow of obedience as part of a religious order? I heard he might have been a Jesuit or Benedictine, but not sure. Please send me a good link with that info.

I heard Galileo was tried for disobedience and wouldn't have been put under house arrest if he was a a lay person. I know Catholic lay people should still be obedient to the Church, but we wouldn't be put under house arrest if we did what Galileo did, right?

God Bless You,
Brian


#2

Galileo did not belong to a religious order you may read about him HERE

According to the Historian Warren Carroll he was found guilty of disobedience. There are those who disagree with this assessment.


#3

So any lay scientist back in the day would have been put under house arrest by the Church? Why not just excommunicate him and call it a day?


#4

So any lay scientist back in the day would have been put under house arrest by the Church?

Why not just excommunicate him and call it a day?

What position did he have in the Church that would give the Church the power to put him under house arrest, if just a lay person?

Maybe to make an example of him to others?

Thank you for your help. I am trying to help my possibly atheist or agnostic friend get past this misunderstanding, including the inquisitions.


#5

[quote="GodHeals, post:3, topic:316268"]
So any lay scientist back in the day would have been put under house arrest by the Church?

[/quote]

Actually, in Italy at the time, the Church was the State. They had secular authority as well as religious.

Here is another article about Galileo's troubles. He could well have avoided them while continuing to advance Copernican cosmology (just as Copernicus himself did).

Why not just excommunicate him and call it a day?

Galileo didn't do anything to require excommunication. He just tried to set himself up as a theologian.


#6

[quote="SonCatcher, post:5, topic:316268"]
Actually, in Italy at the time, the Church was the State. They had secular authority as well as religious.

Here is another article about Galileo's troubles. He could well have avoided them while continuing to advance Copernican cosmology (just as Copernicus himself did).

Galileo didn't do anything to require excommunication. He just tried to set himself up as a theologian.

[/quote]

Thank you, John.

I saw these:
vaticanobservatory.org/index.php/en/history-of-astronomy/197-the-galileo-affair
vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/speeches/1992/october/documents/hf_jp-ii_spe_19921031_accademia-scienze_it.html

The second is in Latin or Italian. So the difference seems to be Copernicus didn't try to be a theologian and Galileo did? Besides the fact he put forth his findings as truth..


#7

Galileo's work was found to be endorsing the views of Copernicus, which at that time could only be discussed as hypothesis.

Not sure about the vows considering Galileo was a layman, but still very religious.


#8

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