Did I stump you?


#1

I’m trying a different approach to getting responses.

Does anyone have any ideas on what the phrase: “Intellectual tradition of dissent” means, when used in reference to the Catholic Church?

The way I’ve seen it used seems to be for defense of opposing teachings of the church. But what tradition are they referring to? Is this in a document of the church somewhere? Does it refer to the reformation?


#2

intellectual = my individual intellect is greater than the combined intellect of hierarchy of the Church over the last 2000 years

traditions = I invented it last year

dissent = I make up my own rules, doctrines and rites as the fancy takes me

heresy = intellectual tradition of dissent to the nth power


#3

Puzzleannie or anyone else,

Have you heard this phrase used before?


#4

[quote=nobody]I’m trying a different approach to getting responses.

Does anyone have any ideas on what the phrase: “Intellectual tradition of dissent” means, when used in reference to the Catholic Church?

The way I’ve seen it used seems to be for defense of opposing teachings of the church. But what tradition are they referring to? Is this in a document of the church somewhere? Does it refer to the reformation?
[/quote]

I believe this is used as a means to confer some sort of false] bona fides upon those who have chosen to be less Catholic than the Pope by those who have chosen to be less Catholic than the Pope.

I would also add that terming such dissent as “intellectual” seems to imply that those who are faithful to all that the Church proposes for our assent re faith and morals are somehow not as “intellectual” and au courant as the dissenters.

The dissenters put themselves as more important than the Church in matters of faith and morals. That is not conscience. That is sinful faithlessness, a sin against the Holy Spirit.


#5

“To his contemporaries he [Aquinas] appeared as an innovator, partly because he treated problems in a fresh way and introduced new lines of argument, partly because on some matters he rejected traditional positions.”

Frederick Copleston SJ, ‘A History of Medieval Philosophy’ 1972, p. 181.


#6

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.