Did Jesus ever say to "confess your sins"


#1

I have not been able to find that Jesus expressed that specific teaching. There are many places where Jesus embraces sinners but doesn't ask them to confess their sins. EX The Thief on the cross. It would appear he was saved by his faith.

I don't mean to suggest for a moment the above is an answer. I just haven't been able to find the verse where Jesus expresses the need for confession of sins, specifically, not by "implication."
thank you
chan26


#2

Scripture doesn't contain what you ask for. It's part of Sacred Tradition. From your post I assume you're already aware of the "by implication" text of John xx, 22-23, and find this inadequate for your purpose (or some Protestant finds it inadequate). In that case you have to rely on authority.


#3

[quote="Chan26, post:1, topic:319013"]
I have not been able to find that Jesus expressed that specific teaching. There are many places where Jesus embraces sinners but doesn't ask them to confess their sins. EX The Thief on the cross. It would appear he was saved by his faith.

I don't mean to suggest for a moment the above is an answer. I just haven't been able to find the verse where Jesus expresses the need for confession of sins, specifically, not by "implication."
thank you
chan26

[/quote]

Jesus being God didn't need to ask, he could probe the heart and mind and grant forgivness to the repentant. We on the otherhand: James 5:16 Therefore confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous man has great power in its effects.


#4

The following citations were taken from ScriptureCatholic.com:

The Necessity of Oral Confession

James 5:16 - James clearly teaches us that we must “confess our sins to one another,” not just privately to God. James 5:16 must be read in the context of James 5:14-15, which is referring to the healing power (both physical and spiritual) of the priests of the Church. Hence, when James says “therefore” in verse 16, he must be referring to the men he was writing about in verses 14 and 15 – these men are the ordained priests of the Church, to whom we must confess our sins.

Acts 19:18 - many came to orally confess sins and divulge their sinful practices. Oral confession was the practice of the early Church just as it is today.

Matt. 3:6; Mark 1:5 - again, this shows people confessing their sins before others as an historical practice (here to John the Baptist).

1 Tim. 6:12 - this verse also refers to the historical practice of confessing both faith and sins in the presence of many witnesses.

1 John 1:9 - if we confess are sins, God is faithful to us and forgives us and cleanse us. But we must confess our sins to one another.

Num. 5:7 - this shows the historical practice of publicly confessing sins, and making public restitution.

2 Sam. 12:14 - even though the sin is forgiven, there is punishment due for the forgiven sin. David is forgiven but his child was still taken (the consequence of his sin).

Neh. 9:2-3 - the Israelites stood before the assembly and confessed sins publicly and interceded for each other.

Sir. 4:26 - God tells us not to be ashamed to confess our sins, and not to try to stop the current of a river. Anyone who has experienced the sacrament of reconciliation understands the import of this verse.

Baruch 1:14 - again, this shows that the people made confession in the house of the Lord, before the assembly.

1 John 5:16-17; Luke 12:47-48 - there is a distinction between mortal and venial sins. This has been the teaching of the Catholic Church for 2,000 years, but, today, most Protestants no longer agree that there is such a distinction. Mortal sins lead to death and must be absolved in the sacrament of reconciliation. Venial sins do not have to be confessed to a priest, but the pious Catholic practice is to do so in order to advance in our journey to holiness.

Matt. 5:19 - Jesus teaches that breaking the least of commandments is venial sin (the person is still saved but is least in the kingdom), versus mortal sin (the person is not saved).

Jesus Gives Apostles Authority to Forgive Sins

John 20:21 - before He grants them the authority to forgive sins, Jesus says to the apostles, "as the Father sent me, so I send you." As Christ was sent by the Father to forgive sins, so Christ sends the apostles and their successors forgive sins.

John 20:22 - the Lord "breathes" on the apostles, and then gives them the power to forgive and retain sins. The only other moment in Scripture where God breathes on man is in Gen. 2:7, when the Lord "breathes" divine life into man. When this happens, a significant transformation takes place.

John 20:23 - Jesus says, "If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven. If you retain the sins of any, they are retained." In order for the apostles to exercise this gift of forgiving sins, the penitents must orally confess their sins to them because the apostles are not mind readers. The text makes this very clear.

Matt. 9:8 - this verse shows that God has given the authority to forgive sins to "men." Hence, those Protestants who acknowledge that the apostles had the authority to forgive sins (which this verse demonstrates) must prove that this gift ended with the apostles. Otherwise, the apostles' successors still possess this gift. Where in Scripture is the gift of authority to forgive sins taken away from the apostles or their successors?

Matt. 9:6; Mark 2:10 - Christ forgave sins as a man (not God) to convince us that the "Son of man" has authority to forgive sins on earth.

Luke 5:24 - Luke also points out that Jesus' authority to forgive sins is as a man, not God. The Gospel writers record this to convince us that God has given this authority to men. This authority has been transferred from Christ to the apostles and their successors.

Matt. 18:18 - the apostles are given authority to bind and loose. The authority to bind and loose includes administering and removing the temporal penalties due to sin. The Jews understood this since the birth of the Church.

John 20:22-23; Matt. 18:18 - the power to remit/retain sin is also the power to remit/retain punishment due to sin. If Christ's ministers can forgive the eternal penalty of sin, they can certainly remit the temporal penalty of sin (which is called an "indulgence").

2 Cor. 2:10 - Paul forgives in the presence of Christ (some translations refer to the presences of Christ as "in persona Christi"). Some say that this may also be a reference to sins.

2 Cor. 5:18 - the ministry of reconciliation was given to the ambassadors of the Church. This ministry of reconciliation refers to the sacrament of reconciliation, also called the sacrament of confession or penance.

James 5:15-16 - in verse 15 we see that sins are forgiven by the priests in the sacrament of the sick. This is another example of man's authority to forgive sins on earth. Then in verse 16, James says “Therefore, confess our sins to one another,” in reference to the men referred to in verse 15, the priests of the Church.

1 Tim. 2:5 - Christ is the only mediator, but He was free to decide how His mediation would be applied to us. The Lord chose to use priests of God to carry out His work of forgiveness.

Lev. 5:4-6; 19:21-22 - even under the Old Covenant, God used priests to forgive and atone for the sins of others.


#5

And, there is the Scripture where it says that our Lord Jesus Christ appeared to the apostles after his Resurrection and breathed on them the Holy Spirit and said "Whose sins you shall forgive they are forgiven, whose sins you shall retain they are retained.

(Of course, they would have to have their confessions heard because it needed to be discerned if the penitent was truly sorry.)


#6

thank you–I should have been even more explicit. I was asking if Jesus ever said the words to confess your sins, not to him necessarily but to any other human.
You alone answer the question. It is tradition that may require we articulate our sins to another.
I note that if one forgets to reveal a sin that he honestly had every intention of revealing to the confessor, that such sin although not announced, is still forgiven. I note also, thousands of people, perhaps more have found themselves alone in dire circumstances and ask God for mercy and forgiveness simply based on their recognition of their sinful nature but don’t inventory the sins. Of course, i recognize as to very serious sin, failing to acknowledge it even to the sky as you pray courts the opportunity for denial.
Very interesting.
thank you Ad Orientum

chan26


#7

[quote="Dorothy, post:5, topic:319013"]
And, there is the Scripture where it says that our Lord Jesus Christ appeared to the apostles after his Resurrection and breathed on them the Holy Spirit and said "Whose sins you shall forgive they are forgiven, whose sins you shall retain they are retained.

(Of course, they would have to have their confessions heard because it needed to be discerned if the penitent was truly sorry.)

[/quote]


#8

[quote="Dorothy, post:7, topic:319013"]

[/quote]

Which sounds like to me, Jesus set up no other conditions for forgiveness of sin. REading the bible is fun. There is so much "it says" that you can't find.
love and the best to you
chan26


#9

Just to be clear, as Catholics we believe that Christ's teachings and institutions come down to us through Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition. If something belongs to Sacred Tradition, it comes from Christ or the Holy Ghost.


#10

[quote="prodigalson2011, post:4, topic:319013"]
The following citations were taken from ScriptureCatholic.com:

The Necessity of Oral Confession

James 5:16 - James clearly teaches us that we must “confess our sins to one another,” not just privately to God. James 5:16 must be read in the context of James 5:14-15, which is referring to the healing power (both physical and spiritual) of the priests of the Church. Hence, when James says “therefore” in verse 16, he must be referring to the men he was writing about in verses 14 and 15 – these men are the ordained priests of the Church, to whom we must confess our sins.

Acts 19:18 - many came to orally confess sins and divulge their sinful practices. Oral confession was the practice of the early Church just as it is today.

Matt. 3:6; Mark 1:5 - again, this shows people confessing their sins before others as an historical practice (here to John the Baptist).

1 Tim. 6:12 - this verse also refers to the historical practice of confessing both faith and sins in the presence of many witnesses.

1 John 1:9 - if we confess are sins, God is faithful to us and forgives us and cleanse us. But we must confess our sins to one another.

Num. 5:7 - this shows the historical practice of publicly confessing sins, and making public restitution.

2 Sam. 12:14 - even though the sin is forgiven, there is punishment due for the forgiven sin. David is forgiven but his child was still taken (the consequence of his sin).

Neh. 9:2-3 - the Israelites stood before the assembly and confessed sins publicly and interceded for each other.

Sir. 4:26 - God tells us not to be ashamed to confess our sins, and not to try to stop the current of a river. Anyone who has experienced the sacrament of reconciliation understands the import of this verse.

Baruch 1:14 - again, this shows that the people made confession in the house of the Lord, before the assembly.

1 John 5:16-17; Luke 12:47-48 - there is a distinction between mortal and venial sins. This has been the teaching of the Catholic Church for 2,000 years, but, today, most Protestants no longer agree that there is such a distinction. Mortal sins lead to death and must be absolved in the sacrament of reconciliation. Venial sins do not have to be confessed to a priest, but the pious Catholic practice is to do so in order to advance in our journey to holiness.

Matt. 5:19 - Jesus teaches that breaking the least of commandments is venial sin (the person is still saved but is least in the kingdom), versus mortal sin (the person is not saved).

Jesus Gives Apostles Authority to Forgive Sins

John 20:21 - before He grants them the authority to forgive sins, Jesus says to the apostles, "as the Father sent me, so I send you." As Christ was sent by the Father to forgive sins, so Christ sends the apostles and their successors forgive sins.

John 20:22 - the Lord "breathes" on the apostles, and then gives them the power to forgive and retain sins. The only other moment in Scripture where God breathes on man is in Gen. 2:7, when the Lord "breathes" divine life into man. When this happens, a significant transformation takes place.

John 20:23 - Jesus says, "If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven. If you retain the sins of any, they are retained." In order for the apostles to exercise this gift of forgiving sins, the penitents must orally confess their sins to them because the apostles are not mind readers. The text makes this very clear.

Matt. 9:8 - this verse shows that God has given the authority to forgive sins to "men." Hence, those Protestants who acknowledge that the apostles had the authority to forgive sins (which this verse demonstrates) must prove that this gift ended with the apostles. Otherwise, the apostles' successors still possess this gift. Where in Scripture is the gift of authority to forgive sins taken away from the apostles or their successors?

Matt. 9:6; Mark 2:10 - Christ forgave sins as a man (not God) to convince us that the "Son of man" has authority to forgive sins on earth.

Luke 5:24 - Luke also points out that Jesus' authority to forgive sins is as a man, not God. The Gospel writers record this to convince us that God has given this authority to men. This authority has been transferred from Christ to the apostles and their successors.

Matt. 18:18 - the apostles are given authority to bind and loose. The authority to bind and loose includes administering and removing the temporal penalties due to sin. The Jews understood this since the birth of the Church.

John 20:22-23; Matt. 18:18 - the power to remit/retain sin is also the power to remit/retain punishment due to sin. If Christ's ministers can forgive the eternal penalty of sin, they can certainly remit the temporal penalty of sin (which is called an "indulgence").

2 Cor. 2:10 - Paul forgives in the presence of Christ (some translations refer to the presences of Christ as "in persona Christi"). Some say that this may also be a reference to sins.

2 Cor. 5:18 - the ministry of reconciliation was given to the ambassadors of the Church. This ministry of reconciliation refers to the sacrament of reconciliation, also called the sacrament of confession or penance.

James 5:15-16 - in verse 15 we see that sins are forgiven by the priests in the sacrament of the sick. This is another example of man's authority to forgive sins on earth. Then in verse 16, James says “Therefore, confess our sins to one another,” in reference to the men referred to in verse 15, the priests of the Church.

1 Tim. 2:5 - Christ is the only mediator, but He was free to decide how His mediation would be applied to us. The Lord chose to use priests of God to carry out His work of forgiveness.

Lev. 5:4-6; 19:21-22 - even under the Old Covenant, God used priests to forgive and atone for the sins of others.

[/quote]

Very good !!:thumbsup: Christ welcomes / expects oral confession ...in our prayers and to his priests.


#11

=Chan26;10498233]I have not been able to find that Jesus expressed that specific teaching. There are many places where Jesus embraces sinners but doesn’t ask them to confess their sins. EX The Thief on the cross. It would appear he was saved by his faith.

I don’t mean to suggest for a moment the above is an answer. I just haven’t been able to find the verse where Jesus expresses the need for confession of sins, specifically, not by "implication."
thank you
chan26

Yes actually!:slight_smile:

1John.1 Verses 8 to 10 “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.”

1John.5 Verses 16 to 17 "If any one sees his brother committing what is not a mortal sin, he will ask, and God will give him life for those whose sin is not mortal. There is sin which is mortal; I do not say that one is to pray for that. All wrongdoing is sin, but there is sin which is not mortal.

John.20 Verses 20 to 23" When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side. Then the disciples were glad when they saw the Lord. Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you. As the Father has sent me, even so I send you.” And when he had said this, he breathed on them, and said to them, "Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained"

God Bless,

As a FYI this was not a new invention by christ. it follows Jewish Historical history dating back to Moses and Aaron and his priest sons:

Lev.5: 13 “Thus the priest shall make atonement for him for the sin which he has committed in any one of these things, and he shall be forgiven. And the remainder shall be for the priest, as in the cereal offering." … Lev.6:7 “and the priest shall make atonement for him before the LORD, and he shall be forgiven for any of the things which one may do and thereby become guilty."

Lev.4: 20,26, 31 “Thus shall he do with the bull; as he did with the bull of the sin offering, so shall he do with this; and the priest shall make atonement for them, and they shall be forgiven. …] And all its fat he shall burn on the altar, like the fat of the sacrifice of peace offerings; so the priest shall make atonement for him for his sin, and he shall be forgiven. …And all its fat he shall remove, as the fat is removed from the peace offerings, and the priest shall burn it upon the altar for a pleasing odor to the LORD; and the priest shall make atonement for him, and he shall be forgiven.

pat/PJM


#12

I mean this respectfully, What does the phrase, “If something belongs to Sacred Tradition, it comes from Christ or the Holy Ghost.” mean.
How do we know something came from the Holy Ghost? With Jesus, either he said it or didn’t say it. Granted scholars are often necessary to understand what anyone said or meant in ancient writings. But i turn to my conscience when “sacred tradition” comes out of whole cloth.
chan26


#13

=Chan26;10513592]I mean this respectfully, What does the phrase, "If something belongs to Sacred Tradition, it comes from Christ or the Holy Ghost.

" mean.

How do we know something came from the Holy Ghost? With Jesus, either he said it or didn't say it. Granted scholars are often necessary to understand what anyone said or meant in ancient writings. But i turn to my conscience when "sacred tradition" comes out of whole cloth.
chan26

Sacred Tradition is directed by God in much the same manner as the Bible is INSPIRED BY HIM.

ST is what God Himself desires for His Church and His chosen people within His [one] church.

ST begin with one or more people beliving or practicing "such and such". IF it "cathces on" within the church AND is something that LEADS the laity TOWARDS GOD [that's the key]; then it is from God's Will.

TWO ADDITIONAL NOTES:

First it's Biblically grounded
1 Cor. 11 2: 2 “I commend you because you remember me in everything and maintain the traditions even as I have delivered them to you”

2 Thess. 2: 13 “But we are bound to give thanks to God always for you, brethren beloved by the Lord, because God chose you from the beginning to be saved, through sanctification by the Spirit and belief in the truth. 14 To this he called you through our gospel, so that you may obtain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. 15 So then, brethren, stand firm and hold to the traditions which you were taught by us, either by word of mouth or by letter.

2 Thess. 6 Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that you keep away from any brother who is living in idleness and not in accord with the tradition that you received from us

Second:

Current Church defiened Dcotrines and Dogma begin with sacred Traditions. Which is NOT to say ALL Traditions Will be or even NEED to be defined.:thumbsup:

THANKS for asking. If this is not sufficient info please let me know.:)

God Bless you,
pat/PJM here on this FORUM


#14

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