Did Pope Constantine move the empire West, and did the Church follow too?


#1

I red that Pope Constantine moved the Roman Capital to Istanbul (Byzantium).

Did the Church follow also, is the true church located in Istanbul. (Orthodox).

I know, its a short description. But I hate to beat around the bush..I get straight to the point. :P


#2

[quote="JD27076, post:1, topic:286321"]
I red that Pope Constantine moved the Roman Capital to Istanbul (Byzantium).

Did the Church follow also, is the true church located in Istanbul. (Orthodox).

I know, its a short description. But I hate to beat around the bush..I get straight to the point. :P

[/quote]

First off: there is no Pope Constantine. ;) Emperor Constantine the Great established Constantinople (ancient Byzantium) as the new capital of the Roman Empire in AD 330.


#3

Constantine was a Catholic-friendly, Roman emperor not a bishop of Rome. When Constantine moved the imperial court to Byzantium, the bishop of Rome remained in Rome. Constantine’s move to Byzantium did nothing to change the first-place status of the Church of Rome.


#4

Constantine was not a Catholic Pope, Bishop, or anything. He was a Roman Emperor.

He DID have a conversion experience which led him to seek Christianity. At first he was merely curious about it… but largely remained pagan. Eventually some say he converted.

Either way… it ended the persecution of the Christians in the Roman Empire. He also urged the Catholic church to create a single canon of Scripture so he could study it. This resulted in the creation of the Christian Bible.

But through all of this… the Catholic church remained centered in Rome. It was not a department of the Roman Empire or subject to interference by the Emperor. It was separate.

First because the Roman government persecuted it, but secondly, because it was religious not political.

The term “Roman Catholic” wasn’t even in use at that time. That term only came into usage around the 1500s after the Protestant Reformation as a slur and an attack on the Catholic faith to try and link it to the Pagan Roman Empire.

Kinda like calling an American “Communist”


#5

jschutzm wrote: Either way.. it ended the persecution of the Christians in the Roman Empire. He also urged the Catholic church to create a single canon of Scripture so he could study it. This resulted in the creation of the Christian Bible.

Could you please give your source for this? I know Emperor Constantine asked for fifty copies of the Scriptures early in the fourth century, but I've never read that this had anything to do with creation of the biblical canon. I've read that no one knows which writings he was given, because none of the copies survived. Thanks.


#6

If Emperor Constantine was not the pope at the time, who was? The poster at my Church says the 88th pontiff is Constantine.


#7

[quote="JD27076, post:6, topic:286321"]
If Emperor Constantine was not the pope at the time, who was?

[/quote]

You are confusing two different people.

The Emperor Constanine livedin the late 3rd and early 4th century, from 272 to 337. He moved the seat of the empire to Constatinople. There were 8 popes during that time period, the last of which was Pope Sylvester I.

[quote="JD27076, post:6, topic:286321"]
The poster at my Church says the 88th pontiff is Constantine.

[/quote]

Yes, there was indeed a pope named Constantine. He, however, was pope in the 700s and had nothing to do with moving the seat of government to Constantinople. Pope Constantine lived in Rome. The emperor during Pope Constantine's reign was Justinian II.


#8
See Black Knight

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