Did Pope Francis say animals go to heaven? [Akin]

Pope Francis declared in his weekly address at St Peter’s Basilica that all animals go to heaven.

Is this considered an infallible statement? Why or why not?

First of all, the Pope never said this: patheos.com/blogs/markshea/2014/12/pope-discusses-new-heaven-and-new-earth-for-very-first-time-in-catholic-history.html. All he did was reinterate the Church’s teaching that there will be a new heaven and a new earth. Read the article for more details. :slight_smile:

Did he now?

Well, no, he didn’t.

Since he never made such a declaration, this is moot.

“One day we will see our animals again in the eternity of Christ. Paradise is open to all God’s creatures.”

If he did make such a statement it would not be infallible for two reasons:

First, It is not a matter of faith and morals. Whether animals go to heaven has nothing to do with our salvation. If the Pope said that the pizza buffet in heaven never closes, it could not be infallible because it has nothing to do with our salvation.

Second, the teaching would need to be proclaimed

… when, in the exercise of his office as shepherd and teacher of all Christians, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority… [Vatican-1, FDCC 4,9]

So how do we know when a Pope intends exercise his supreme apostolic authority? Well, there’s a certain way of “doing things” in the Church. When the Pope is giving a homily or making a speech, it is not his intent to “exercise his office as shepherd and teacher of all Christians” and promulgate doctrine. That is simply not how it works.

When a Pope intends to teach at the level of defining doctrine, he does so in a more solemn manner (whether he intends to teach infallibly or not). This will always be in written form (in Latin, which is the official version, independent of any translations). There are degrees of solemnity for Papal documents - from the lowly Apostolic Letter (which would never define doctrine) up to the very solemn Apostolic Constitution (which could).

The Pope expresses his intent in the manner in which he teaches, and this is known and understood by all Bishops.

I doubt the Pope said this.
If you think your pets may go to heaven, would you also believe they can go to hell? That is, I suppose, if they do not live virtuously.

People probably saw this on the Yahoo homepage. :rolleyes:

Could you give a link to this sentence?

Thanks for actually answering the question.

I definitely understand what you’re saying, but isn’t there a lot of doctrine or dogma that doesn’t really affect our salvation? Whether or not Mary was assumed into Heaven, shouldn’t really affect my salvation. Right? Or is there some way that my salvation is tied to this event?

Second, the teaching would need to be proclaimed

So how do we know when a Pope intends exercise his supreme apostolic authority? Well, there’s a certain way of “doing things” in the Church. When the Pope is giving a homily or making a speech, it is not his intent to “exercise his office as shepherd and teacher of all Christians” and promulgate doctrine. That is simply not how it works.

When a Pope intends to teach at the level of defining doctrine, he does so in a more solemn manner (whether he intends to teach infallibly or not). This will always be in written form (in Latin, which is the official version, independent of any translations). There are degrees of solemnity for Papal documents - from the lowly Apostolic Letter (which would never define doctrine) up to the very solemn Apostolic Constitution (which could).

The Pope expresses his intent in the manner in which he teaches, and this is known and understood by all Bishops.

I’ve heard it stated before that it is always in written form. Where does this teaching come from? I didn’t see anything about that in the Vatican I document. It actually uses the word “speaks” (although, I understand that can be used in a metaphorical way).

[quote=Vatican I]Therefore, faithfully adhering to the tradition received from the beginning of the Christian faith, to the glory of God our savior, for the exaltation of the Catholic religion and for the salvation of the Christian people, with the approval of the Sacred Council, we teach and define as a divinely revealed dogma that when the Roman Pontiff speaks EX CATHEDRA, that is, when, in the exercise of his office as shepherd and teacher of all Christians, in virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, he defines a doctrine concerning faith or morals to be held by the whole Church, he possesses, by the divine assistance promised to him in blessed Peter, that infallibility which the divine Redeemer willed his Church to enjoy in defining doctrine concerning faith or morals. Therefore, such definitions of the Roman Pontiff are of themselves, and not by the consent of the Church, irreformable.
[/quote]

Probably not. It was (allegedly) said during the Pope’s weekly address. I’ve never heard of a transcript of such an address being published by the Vatican. A cursory search of the Vatican website didn’t turn up anything.

This thread illustrates the point I made about all teaching being in written form. Nobody knows if the Pope said this or not. Even if he said it, we have only the account of people who were in the audience - who have no magesterial authority to proclaim doctrine. Doctrine is proclaimed to the world by Popes and Bishops, not by laypeople in a crowd who pass it along.

:thumbsup:

cathnews.co.nz/2014/12/02/animals-also-go-heaven-suggests-pope/

According to this article, someone else entirely said it…:rolleyes:

Our Lady’s assumption is part of the salvation mystery. As the perfect “type” and “model” of the Church, Our Lady shared in the resurrection of Her Divine Son and was assumed into heaven “body and soul” in anticipation of the eventual resurrection and “assumption into heaven” of all the saints (including, God willing, you and me) on the Last Day.

You can find the text of the Pope’s comments at this web site. If you can find the statements that you purport came from the pope in this transcript, I’d love to see it.

Yet again, we see the same old dynamic: Pope speaks; somebody else interprets what he said (and does a really, really bad job of it); news media takes the interpretation and claims that it’s what the Pope said.

businessinsider.com/pope-francis-animals-go-to-heaven-2014-12
thenewdaily.com.au/news/2014/12/11/pope-animals-go-heaven/
theguardian.com/world/2014/nov/27/pope-francis-hints-animals-heaven

Self-righteous much?

I’m not saying I believe what it says. Someone asked where it was online. Note the sarcastic smiley.
Wow.

Yes, I support that. Mosquitos should go to hell. But only the females - the males are vegetarians.

CS Lewis remarked that mosquito heaven and human Hell could easily be combined. :slight_smile:

As to the OP:

I would love it if it were true; but until I hear anything authoritative about it, I will count instead on working off my Purgatory.

ICXC NIKA.

Why would you even make this sarcastic comment if you weren’t in some way trying to imply that your level of knowledge and intellect exceeds those who use Yahoo to get news? Why would you take the time to comment and provide no useful information to the discussion, but merely make a sarcastic dig on someone?

But anyways, no, I did not get it from Yahoo.

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