Did Pope John Paul II and then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger make errors in the Catechism of the Catholic Church?


#1

For example,

1393 states: Holy Communion seperates us from sin…cleansing us from past sins and preserving us from future sins.
1394 states: As bodily nourishment restores lost strength, so the Eucharist strengthens our charity, …

1395: By the same charity that it enkindles in us, the Eucharist preserves us from future mortal sins. The more we share the life of Christ and progress in his friendship, the more difficult it is to break away from him by mortal sin.

Shouldn’t this be more accurately stated like:

1393 states: Holy Communion seperates us from sin…cleansing us from past sins and potentialy preserving us from future sins providing they do not resist God’s Grace..
1394 states: As bodily nourishment restores lost strength, so the Eucharist **has the potential to **strengthen our charity…providing they do not resist God’s Grace.
1395: By the same charity that it enkindles in us, the Eucharist **has the potential to **preserve us from future mortal sins providing they do not resist God’s Grace… **The more we share **the life of Christ and progress in his friendship, the more difficult it is to break away from him by mortal sin. providing more effort is not put forth in resisting God’s Grace.

I do not want to talk about all the sex scandels etc. But focus on the observation that these priests etc. received the sacrament of communion more than a layman. Perhaps 3 or more times a day. Now receiving that many times - and still committing such vile acts demonstrates the Eucharist to be of non effect.

Wouldn’t Pope John Paul II and the then Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger been better off to reword it as above (example). The way it is stated it appears to be an absolute - but evidenced by the acts of these priests would bring question to those statements.


#2

OK I’m gunna assume this is a serious question.
It seems by “errors” you mean “grammatical errors”. You seem to think the word “preserve” implies some idea of an absolute guarantee. But it may not, eg wearing a life preserver doesn’t mean you can’t drown. You are reading an absolutist idea into the text which isn’t there.

I really like how you manage to talk about something which you claim you don’t want to talk about. (Yeah, I’ll bet you don’t). Don’t know where you get the idea that priests receive Communion “3 or more times a day”. They are restricted to once a day, same as the laity, although they can get permission to say a second Mass on Sundays if pastorally essential (if there is only one priest and his church can’t hold at once all the people who want to come to Mass on Sunday). Rarely they can get permission for a third Mass but I’ve never heard of any priest getting permission for “more”.

And I don’t have it handy but I’m sure you’ll find mentioned in the Catechism the well-known Catholic doctrine that if one receives Communion in the state of mortal sin, one receives a curse instead of a blessing, and eats and drinks damnation upon himself as St Paul says.


#3

providing they do not resist God’s Grace” is implied in ALL of the teachings of the Catholic faith.

Do you really want to increase the already large volume of the RCC by 2 or 3 (or perhaps even more) times by adding that redundant phrase to EVERY teaching there?


#4

Perhaps I am mistaken. I know my mother goes every morning. I use to go weekdays in the evening same parish). That is two times - but perhaps different priests?

But even receiving the actual body and blood of Christ once a day, every day, should build quite the resistance to mortal sin.


#5

And yet, even a high resistance to mortal sin does not imply the person WANTS to resist making mortal sins.

Malachi, it really depends on the person how he/she wants to live his/her life, no matter what his/her gifts.

And besides, priests and the religious are in the front lines of the war against the world and the hordes of hell. No matter how great their graces are, they will always be under Satan’s crosshairs, just waiting for them to slip up and exploit their weaknesses. Please pray for them.


#6

Salt is a preservative, yet adding salt doesn’t guarantee meat or other food won’t spoil.

Inadequate analogy, I know. However, Scripture tells us we’re to discern our worthiness before receiving the Eucharist (see 1 Corinthians 11:27-29).

Holy Communion cleanses us from venial sin, not mortal sin. Committing a mortal sin is a choice to separate ourselves from God.

Knowingly receiving Holy Communion unworthily is compounding the mortal sin – it’s an abuse of the body and blood of Jesus. A person (including a priest) does not receive the graces otherwise given in this sacrament by our Lord.


#7

#8

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