Did St. Peter go to confession


#1

Hello everyone,

Since St. Peter consciously rejected Christ and therefore comitting a mortal sin. Did he ever go to confession and to who?


#2

Maybe Jesus asking him 3 times ‘do you love me?’ was his confession, to offset Peter’s 3 rejections.


#3

[quote=Elzee]Maybe Jesus asking him 3 times ‘do you love me?’ was his confession, to offset Peter’s 3 rejections.
[/quote]

Good point I never thought of that.


#4

I would also assume that he confessed and talked to the other apostles, to gain forgiveness and support.

Just like the Pope today would confess his sins, or seek spiritual guidence.


#5

[quote=chb03c]Hello everyone,

Since St. Peter consciously rejected Christ and therefore comitting a mortal sin. Did he ever go to confession and to who?
[/quote]

Just a thought. I think most would agree the matter is serious, however, can anyone but St. Peter know whether he had sufficient reflection without which his sin would not be mortal? Lk 22:61ff…And the Lord turned and looked at Peter. And Peter remembered the word of the Lord,"


#6

[quote=chb03c]Hello everyone,

Since St. Peter consciously rejected Christ and therefore comitting a mortal sin. Did he ever go to confession and to who?
[/quote]

No. This can be known because, although the division of sins by their gravity is ancient, the combination of

[list]
*]that particular division (there is more than one)
*]with frequent confession
*]in private
*]& absolution by a priest
*]who imposes a penance which does not stop the penitent receiving the Eucharist
[/list]dates only from about the 12th century.

Early on, confession was rare because it was only for very grave sins such as apostasy or adultery or murder: different Churches - Milan, Rome, Carthage for instance - had each its own penitential discipline, and at different times they might differ in their severity towards one or more of these; the point being, that the severe attitude of Carthage to certain sins in 300 or so, did not imply that the same sins were treated with the same severity in Milan or Constantinople in 400 or so. The Churches were conscious of their unity with each other - but they were not uniform in all things - certainly not in penitential practice. The degree to which Catholic Churches in Moscow, Tokyo, London, Boston & Rome (say) are uniform, because they are all Latin Rite Churches, is a later development. The Letter to the Hebrews shows us a view of apostasy which regards it as wholly unforgivable - the Church in Rome was beginning to have a more lenient view by no later than 140 or so. Some Churches refused absolution for it even at the moment of death, regarding it either as too grave for the Church to forgive, or even beyond the Will of God to forgive.

Celtic practice, which is one of the sources of the the practice of frequent confession, even if the sin was relatively slight - brawling, say, as compared with murder - often gave penances of several years for a single sin. It was very strict - but so was a great deal of penitential practice in the first five centuries. Penances of 20 years were not unusual. A Celtic innovation was to have the absolution precede the penance - in older practice, the order was confession, penance, absolution. Another Celtic practice was to commute penances by allowing X to do penance instead of Y having to do so: one root of the practice of indulgences.

Before commutation came along, penance was public - not private.
[list]
*]Confession of sin came first:
*]penitents were divided into groups, and had to move from group to group in order
*]“Weepers” had to stay outside the church until they had done
*]Thn they were admitted inside, and joined the “hearers”, who could stay only until the Liturgy of the Eucharist was about to begin
*]then they became “kneelers”, and could take part in the prayers made for them; they left with the Catechumens
*]then they were allowed to stand with the faithful as consistentes - but could not make their offerings or receive the Eucharist
*]then, they could be absolved and restored to the faithful; & would then be able to receive.
[/list]So although confession of sins is very early, the form of practice of the sacrament familiar to RCs today is not.

Besides, Peter was not a Christian - he was a Jew. To think of him as “going to confession” is to ask the wrong sort of question. The first Christians were observant Jews. ##


#7

[quote=Gottle of Geer]## No. This can be known because, although the division of sins by their gravity is ancient, the combination of
[list]
*]that particular division (there is more than one)
*]with frequent confession
*]in private
*]& absolution by a priest
*]who imposes a penance which does not stop the penitent receiving the Eucharist
[/list]dates only from about the 12th century.

Early on, confession was rare because it was only for very grave sins such as apostasy or adultery or murder: different Churches - Milan, Rome, Carthage for instance - had each its own penitential discipline, and at different times they might differ in their severity towards one or more of these; the point being, that the severe attitude of Carthage to certain sins in 300 or so, did not imply that the same sins were treated with the same severity in Milan or Constantinople in 400 or so. The Churches were conscious of their unity with each other - but they were not uniform in all things - certainly not in penitential practice. The degree to which Catholic Churches in Moscow, Tokyo, London, Boston & Rome (say) are uniform, because they are all Latin Rite Churches, is a later development. The Letter to the Hebrews shows us a view of apostasy which regards it as wholly unforgivable - the Church in Rome was beginning to have a more lenient view by no later than 140 or so. Some Churches refused absolution for it even at the moment of death, regarding it either as too grave for the Church to forgive, or even beyond the Will of God to forgive.

Celtic practice, which is one of the sources of the the practice of frequent confession, even if the sin was relatively slight - brawling, say, as compared with murder - often gave penances of several years for a single sin. It was very strict - but so was a great deal of penitential practice in the first five centuries. Penances of 20 years were not unusual. A Celtic innovation was to have the absolution precede the penance - in older practice, the order was confession, penance, absolution. Another Celtic practice was to commute penances by allowing X to do penance instead of Y having to do so: one root of the practice of indulgences.

Before commutation came along, penance was public - not private.
[list]
*]Confession of sin came first:
*]penitents were divided into groups, and had to move from group to group in order
*]“Weepers” had to stay outside the church until they had done
*]Thn they were admitted inside, and joined the “hearers”, who could stay only until the Liturgy of the Eucharist was about to begin
*]then they became “kneelers”, and could take part in the prayers made for them; they left with the Catechumens
*]then they were allowed to stand with the faithful as consistentes - but could not make their offerings or receive the Eucharist
*]then, they could be absolved and restored to the faithful; & would then be able to receive.
[/list]So although confession of sins is very early, the form of practice of the sacrament familiar to RCs today is not.

Besides, Peter was not a Christian - he was a Jew. To think of him as “going to confession” is to ask the wrong sort of question. The first Christians were observant Jews. ##
[/quote]

Wow. Nicely done.


#8

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