Did you ever have a time at Mass where the music touched you so much, you felt like crying?

Sometimes at Mass the responsorial psalm will make me really emotional. Some of them are so beautiful.

[quote="CatholicZ09, post:1, topic:183638"]
Sometimes at Mass the responsorial psalm will make me really emotional. Some of them are so beautiful.

[/quote]

I see a lot of people choking up during the Responsorial Psalm. The only time I've ever choked up was when the previous pastor used to give homilies and he would choke up. You could see him really reflecting on the Gospel and he would be on the verge of tears; his voice would crack and he would wipe his eyes. That would put the rest of us on the verge of tears as well!

Unfortunately he just retired.

Oddly enough, Christmas carols in church choke me up, especially "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing". Not exactly sure why.

The first time that I heard this song, it was a real gut wrencher for me and most beautiful. It is the Attende Domine:

R. Hear, O Lord, and have mercy upon us, who have sinned against Thee.

1.King, high exalted, all the world's Redeemer, to Thee we lift out eyes with weeping: Christ, we implore Thee, hear Thy suppliant's prayers. R.

  1. Right hand of Godhead, headstone of the corner, path of salvation, gate of heaven, wash away the stains of our sin. R.

  2. We, Thy eternal majesty entreating, with Thy blessed ears hear our sighing: graciously grant pardon to our sins. R.

  3. Humbly confess we, who have sinned against Thee, with contrite hearts we reveal things hidden; O Redeemer, may Thy pity grant forgiveness. R.

  4. Led away captive, guiltless, unresisting, condemned by false witnesses unto death for sinners, Christ do Thou keep us whom Thy blood hath ransomed. R.

It is the quintessential Lenten hymn, dating back to the 10th century. It does not sugar-coat things and it is quite beatiful. In fact, I catch myself singinig along when it is chanted at the Papal Ash Wednesday Mass. O Sacred Head Surrounded is also quite impacting, the original version.

First time I went to Mass I bawled.

[quote="benedictgal, post:4, topic:183638"]
The first time that I heard this song, it was a real gut wrencher for me and most beautiful. It is the Attende Domine:

It is the quintessential Lenten hymn, dating back to the 10th century. It does not sugar-coat things and it is quite beatiful. In fact, I catch myself singinig along when it is chanted at the Papal Ash Wednesday Mass. O Sacred Head Surrounded is also quite impacting, the original version.

[/quote]

Benedictgal, I remember hearing that at Ash Wednesday Mass during the procession to get ashes. I thought it was so beautiful and I couldn't wait to get back to the pew to sing it!

The responsorial Psalm for Good Friday always gets to me. "My God, my God, why have you abandoned me?" We have one setting, I don't remember who composed it, but it is really heart-wrenching. I was cantor, and had to dig my nails into my palms in order to keep from breaking down while I was singing it!

As an organist, I have a couple of favorite pieces which will almost always bring tears to my eyes, but mostly when I'm practicing alone. When I'm playing these for Mass, I have to concentrate on the mechanics of making music, so I don't free myself to just "be" with the music. One is Bach's famous Lenten chorale prelude "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" (O Man, bewail thy great sins) and the other is Buxtehude's "Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist" (We pray to the Holy Ghost). My fellow organists know what I mean -- these pieces are profound and beautiful.

For the past 68 Sundays, ive been attending a TLM Solemn High Mass, celebrated by the Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter (TOTALLY in union with Rome). The church has 4 choirs: girls, boys, ladies, gents. A few Sundays back, the two childrens choirs handled all of the Gregorian Chant, the Credo (we sang our part of the Credo) etc. A lot of us were very subdued when we left the church. It was STUNNING.. The more subdued voices gave an ethereal beauty to it all. On any Sunday at this church, you can get misty eyed: the "Asperges me", sung before High Mass starts, can put a lump in your throat.

The feast of Saints Peter and Paul was celebrated on the Sunday following the actual date. The recessional hymn, sung to the tune of "O Jesus Christ, remember" was for the Popes intentions, calling on our Lord for help.
Each verse ends:
The Holy Father shielding
His enemies o
erthrow
May Peters Faith unyielding
The path to Heav
n foreshow
Got choked up, well and truly.

Holy God, we praise Thy Name
The hymn to Our Lady of Perpetual Succour

Its a combination of the sights and sounds here: a church which hasnt been vandalised, 4 side altars, white marble High Altar, great statues, a pipe organ etc. Plus reverence. Catholic worship at its best.

[quote="CatholicZ09, post:6, topic:183638"]
Benedictgal, I remember hearing that at Ash Wednesday Mass during the procession to get ashes. I thought it was so beautiful and I couldn't wait to get back to the pew to sing it!

[/quote]

I have used it tri-lingually. It is really nice. In fact, a priest used some of it as the basis of his homily as to how we need to remember how painful sin is. Attende Domine is my favorite Lenten hymn. In fact, I have used it for funerals during and outside of Lent. It was the entrance processional for my paternal grandmother's funeral. She died a week before Holy Week in 2006.

You might be referring to the one in the Worship III hymnal for Palm Sunday. It is haunting and beautiful. In fact, it is one that I really miss hearing. I may order it for my parish (from GIA) just so that we won’t use that tired OCP version we hear year after year.

The Christmas Proclamation also gets to me (in a profound way). Even when I was reading it before Mass began, I found it quite impacting. It traces salvation history both through Ancient Israel and the secular world. I wish that more parishes could make use of this treasure. The same holds true with the Exultet, properly proclaimed. I am hoping that the new Translation restores the beauty of the original wording.

Once I was on a week long retreat. It was a good retreat, we had a lot of time for prayer. One of the brothers in this monastery had written a song entitled "Caught Up In Wonder" and it went something like this:

*The heavens proclaiming the glory of God *
*And yet no sound can be heard *
*Caught up in wonder we sing of your spirit *
*Now Father give us Your word, *
*Let me sing of your wonderful name *
*Let my lips tell the joy of your love. *

We were singing this song at Mass that day, and when we got to the part where we sang "Now Father give us Your word." I felt a great joy like I had never felt before or since for that matter. It was a joy so great that to this day I believe that day back in the 1970's I had for a brief eternity been given a glimpse of what heaven will be like. I've never forgotten this great gift that was given to me. I know this is hard to believe but I don't think that I was in the chapel. This lasted only for a brief moment or two because if it had lasted longer, I would not have been able to return. I did not float out of my body or anything, I just was no longer in the chapel. I had no visions of heaven just utter and complete joy.

I know that there is a heaven and it will be a perfect place of great joy forever. On those days when the Lord seems to be far from me, I can think of wonderful gift and know that it is I that am absent, not He.

I realize that this is something that is hard for someone outside of myself to believe. But in this case you most certainly had to be there. :o

I haven't thought so deeply about this for years, thank you for this thread.
Praise God from whom all blessings flow!

There are a few songs, one a rendition of The Magnificat, that hit me this way.
Like Our Lady, Mary, I can attest that
"The mighty God has done great things for me, He has looked upon me in my lowliness".

But none of the music hits me like the moment of Consecration, and of receiving the Holy Eucharist. To BE in His presence, in the company of all of Heaven, is beyond anything else in my experience.

Yes When I attend and/or serve the TLM masses in NYC the music makes me feel like I'm in heaven. For instance this happens at the Asperges Me Domine, the Gradual/Tract, Communion motets and florid organ voluntaries. Much gratitude to the choirs, scholas, and cantors who make it possible.

Sing to the Lord a new song sing to him all the earth Amen:thumbsup:

[quote="CarrieH, post:7, topic:183638"]
As an organist, I have a couple of favorite pieces which will almost always bring tears to my eyes, but mostly when I'm practicing alone. When I'm playing these for Mass, I have to concentrate on the mechanics of making music, so I don't free myself to just "be" with the music. One is Bach's famous Lenten chorale prelude "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" (O Man, bewail thy great sins) and the other is Buxtehude's "Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist" (We pray to the Holy Ghost). My fellow organists know what I mean -- these pieces are profound and beautiful.

[/quote]

Organ music always touches me. It's like the voice of God.

[quote="CatholicZ09, post:1, topic:183638"]
Sometimes at Mass the responsorial psalm will make me really emotional. Some of them are so beautiful.

[/quote]

Usually it's the readings. I often can't make it through the readings w/o crying.
Not sobbing, mind you. :o

[quote="CatholicZ09, post:1, topic:183638"]
Sometimes at Mass the responsorial psalm will make me really emotional. Some of them are so beautiful.

[/quote]

I haven't just "felt like" crying, I have cried - many times. It can be a bad thing since I sing in our small choir and get so choked up I can't sing, and I really want to keep singing. I've never understood how some people can continue to sing without a blip while tears stream down their face. Not me. :rolleyes:

[quote="damooster, post:2, topic:183638"]
I see a lot of people choking up during the Responsorial Psalm. The only time I've ever choked up was when the previous pastor used to give homilies and he would choke up. You could see him really reflecting on the Gospel and he would be on the verge of tears; his voice would crack and he would wipe his eyes. That would put the rest of us on the verge of tears as well!

Unfortunately he just retired.

[/quote]

I love when priests care that much. Condolences to you on his retirement.

[quote="CarrieH, post:7, topic:183638"]
As an organist, I have a couple of favorite pieces which will almost always bring tears to my eyes, but mostly when I'm practicing alone. When I'm playing these for Mass, I have to concentrate on the mechanics of making music, so I don't free myself to just "be" with the music. One is Bach's famous Lenten chorale prelude "O Mensch, bewein dein Sünde groß" (O Man, bewail thy great sins) and the other is Buxtehude's "Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist" (We pray to the Holy Ghost). My fellow organists know what I mean -- these pieces are profound and beautiful.

[/quote]

I agree with you regarding "O Mensch, bewein..." ( I can't recall the Buxtehude at the moment) - I know that Bach's organ music is full of religious symbolism, but some of it seems so mechanical and devoid of emotion. This piece, though, is so expressive, especially if the organ has a particularly beautiful solo stop like a cornet or cromorne.

There's no doubt but that Lenten music is probably the most likely to bring tears to one's eyes... There's so much beautiful music for Passiontide especially. I agree with Attende Domine; a hymn I love to have sung several times over Lent. When I Behold the Wondrous Cross is lovely too - the tune it's usually sung to, Rockingham suits the text wonderfully. Each verse has such vivid imagery - you can't beat the good old English hymns for that! Another piece which we sing during Passiontide is Ecce Quomodo ("Behold how the Just Man dies") by Jacob Handl - it always brings me close to tears. If I was actually listening as one of the congregation instead of concentrating on making music, like you Carrie, I probably would be moved to tears by it though!

I always get choked up singing "How Great Thou Art".

For me, yes. But much more often at Protestant gospel services than at Mass.

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