differance between catholic & Episcopal church

Hi could someone please advise what the differance between catholic church and the episcopl church is

one difference is that the Episcopal church doesn’t recognize the pope but rather the king of England as head of the church ( I think…)

Laura:p

Along with rejecting the papacy, Anglicans reject transubstantiation as taught by the Catholic Church. Also, there are various sects within Anglicanism from High Church Anglicans whose beliefs are very close to those of the Catholic Church to middle of the road parishes that may or may not be orthodox in their teaching and practice to low church parishes that more resemble Evangelical Christians in beliefs and practice.

I am 100% serious about this. At a place I used to work there was an Episcopalian minister that would come in. He was so friendly and approachable. He knew I was Catholic and we would chit-chat about religion , but nothing too heavy. One day I told him I really did not know much about his church and I asked him what some of the differences were.

He said to me: “We are very similar to the Catholic Church. Just with more fun, more ritual, and a lot less guilt.”

That was how he summed it up for me. :o

No women clergy here.

Not supposed to have gay clergy (were working on that one at the moment) :frowning:

We answer to the Pope.

We believe in the literal presence of Christ in the Eucharist.

I’d say those are the biggies. There are a lot of similarities, especially with the more Traditional Anglicans. Some go so far as to call themselves Anglo-Catholics.

[quote=crobynb]I am 100% serious about this. At a place I used to work there was an Episcopalian minister that would come in. He was so friendly and approachable. He knew I was Catholic and we would chit-chat about religion , but nothing too heavy. One day I told him I really did not know much about his church and I asked him what some of the differences were.

He said to me: “We are very similar to the Catholic Church. Just with more fun, more ritual, and a lot less guilt.”

That was how he summed it up for me. :o
[/quote]

Episcopalians sometimes call themselves "Catholic Lite"
BH

Isodore_AK,

“We believe in the literal presence of Christ in the Eucharist”.

And so do most Episcopalians. It’s why you’ll find tabernacles, on the altar, the Sacrament reserved, no EEMs distributing the Body and Blood, Adoration of the Sacrament, reverencing the tabernacle, a piscina, and lots of similar things. Yes, as Della says, there are different sorts of Episcopalians, to be sure. Even those how affirm Trent, Session XIII, Canon 2. It’s just not *de fide * for Anglicans.

GKC, (who even signs himself)

Anglicanus Catholicus

and I just thought the episcopal pastors were evnvious of the collared garb worn by our priests!

imitation is the sincerest form of flattery…

[quote=JoeyWarren]and I just thought the episcopal pastors were evnvious of the collared garb worn by our priests!

imitation is the sincerest form of flattery…
[/quote]

Similarity or identity of beliefs (as far as that goes), will often lead to an identity of praxis. Anglicans have Adoration of the Sacrament for the same reason you do. And don’t have EEMs ( those who don’t, that is) for the same reason you formerly didn’t.

GKC

[quote=GKC]Isodore_AK,

It’s why you’ll find tabernacles, on the altar, the Sacrament reserved, no EEMs distributing the Body and Blood.

GKC, (who even signs himself)

Anglicanus Catholicus
[/quote]

I was the head alter server in my younger days in the Anglican church and we did not have a tabernacle at church (although the parish church in town did) we also had a woman who was given permission from the Bishop to distribute the wine at communion (not sure what her title would have been)

[quote=GKC]Isidore_AK,

“We believe in the literal presence of Christ in the Eucharist”.

And so do most Episcopalians. It’s why you’ll find tabernacles, on the altar, the Sacrament reserved, no EEMs distributing the Body and Blood, Adoration of the Sacrament, reverencing the tabernacle, a piscina, and lots of similar things. Yes, as Della says, there are different sorts of Episcopalians, to be sure. Even those how affirm Trent, Session XIII, Canon 2. It’s just not *de fide * for Anglicans.

GKC, (who even signs himself)

Anglicanus Catholicus
[/quote]

But, it is not a belief that is ‘official’ throughout the episcopalian church. As I said, some Anglicans are a millimeter of being Catholics, while others are closer in belief to Charismatic Fundamentalists. Some only believe in a ‘spiritual’ presence of Christ, while others are more literal- and the Anglican church does not require belief either way. As opposed to the Catholic Church which requires belief in the Presence of Christ through Transubstantiation.

[quote=Isidore_AK]But, it is not a belief that is ‘official’ throughout the episcopalian church. As I said, some Anglicans are a millimeter of being Catholics, while others are closer in belief to Charismatic Fundamentalists. Some only believe in a ‘spiritual’ presence of Christ, while others are more literal- and the Anglican church does not require belief either way. As opposed to the Catholic Church which requires belief in the Presence of Christ through Transubstantiation.
[/quote]

Agree with both your observations, and with Pious’. As I have said before, including in this thread, there are Anglicans, and then there are Anglicans.Historically, you can find a range of doctrine, (once held under a common umbrella of historic Creedal orthodoxy, now not necessarily the case), ranging from more or less reformed to beyond Anglo-Cathlic (that’s Anglo-Papal). What I tend to respond to are statements that “Anglicans believe thus-and so” when Anglicans may believe that or may believe something else entirely, depending on whom you’re talking to. Right now, you’re talking to an Anglo-Catholic. And my parish practices are as I have described.

Yes, as I said, transubstantiation is a pious opinion among Anglicans, and is not de fide. It is a common belief in my parish, but as Lewis observed, Our Lord’s command was “Take, eat” not "Take, understand. We consider the “how” of the Real Presence as a mystery. Transubstantiation might well be the answer, to be sure.

As for females (or nonordained folk in general) and the distribution of the Body and Blood, you are right again. Some Anglicans have abandoned a lot of common doctrine. Including allowing EEMs, and laying hands on hairspray, as we say. Also, listening to Spong is not unknown. It’s one reason why you can find Anglicans no longer in communion with Canterbury, or in the US, not in communion with ECUSA.

GKC

[quote=GKC]Also, listening to Spong is not unknown. It’s one reason why you can find Anglicans no longer in communion with Canterbury, or in the US, not in communion with ECUSA.

GKC
[/quote]

How much influence did he have anyway? Does he still have some clout within the EC since his retirement?

[quote=MusicMan]How much influence did he have anyway? Does he still have some clout within the EC since his retirement?
[/quote]

It is not so much that he has influence, as that he was tolerated within the heart of ECUSA. And to a certain extent, exemplified the modern ECUSA ethos.

GKC

Here’s a pretty good article that I found…what do you think ?

anglicansonline.org/resources/essays/whalon/AngRC-diffEng.html

Br. Mark, OSB

I would tend to disagree where it says that the Pope has never had more authority. They’ve obviously forgotten about the Middle Ages when the Pope had the power to bring down kings. For that matter, they could stamp out heresies, too. Even with all Pope JPII’s moral authority, he could not even get the majority of American Catholics to not use artificial birth control. Even though he routinely condemned it.

Andrew Greeley has referred to it as a recasting of Church authority as the ability to charm. To some extent, this is probably because the Church has only blunt instruments such as excommunication or the power to keep the sacraments from being dispensed in a nation (forget the technical term for this). I mean, priests can read the riot act in the confessional but if no one’s going to confession… Priests can withold communion but if the person can just go to another church…

I was relieved to see that I won’t have to take a RCIA program to receive sacraments in the Episcopal Church. I’ve been a Roman Catholic Apostate for the last two years and am looking to regularize myself by becoming Episcopalian. It at least sounds better than Apostate and I’ve found a very nice worship community. I have nothing against the Roman Catholic Church, I just don’t agree with Her on all things. I have deeply held beliefs that are more important to me than anything else and which will not be changed. Some of those are in opposition to Rome. None of them is in opposition to the Episcopalian Church so it seems as though this is a better fit for both of us.

[quote=a_cermak]I was relieved to see that I won’t have to take a RCIA program to receive sacraments in the Episcopal Church. I’ve been a Roman Catholic Apostate for the last two years and am looking to regularize myself by becoming Episcopalian. It at least sounds better than Apostate and I’ve found a very nice worship community. I have nothing against the Roman Catholic Church, I just don’t agree with Her on all things. I have deeply held beliefs that are more important to me than anything else and which will not be changed. Some of those are in opposition to Rome. None of them is in opposition to the Episcopalian Church so it seems as though this is a better fit for both of us.
[/quote]

I hope you’ve found a maximally orthodox parish. There are a lot of dicey ones.

GKC

[quote=marke]Here’s a pretty good article that I found…what do you think ?

anglicansonline.org/resources/essays/whalon/AngRC-diffEng.html

Br. Mark, OSB
[/quote]

If you mean me, as an Anglican, that’s a good site you’ve linked to, that I have used before. The article is also a good one, which repeats some points I’ve made here. I would tweak it, here and there, as we Anglicans do, if I had time.

GKC

[quote=a_cermak]I was relieved to see that I won’t have to take a RCIA program to receive sacraments in the Episcopal Church. I’ve been a Roman Catholic Apostate for the last two years and am looking to regularize myself by becoming Episcopalian. It at least sounds better than Apostate and I’ve found a very nice worship community. I have nothing against the Roman Catholic Church, I just don’t agree with Her on all things. I have deeply held beliefs that are more important to me than anything else and which will not be changed. Some of those are in opposition to Rome. None of them is in opposition to the Episcopalian Church so it seems as though this is a better fit for both of us.
[/quote]

I hope you stick around long enough to hear our version ofthe story before making such a rash decision.

God bless you,

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