Difference between Sola Fide and Sola Gratia?


#1

One is faith alone the other is grace alone? Why the need for two different terms.

I see that what I am saying doesnt make much sense, so I will try to say it this way. Both of these deal with salvation, but as two separate issues.
Why say grace alone?..It makes it sound like everybody is saved no matter what.
I CAN understand someone using ONLY the term “faith alone”, because the person has to have faith in order for anything to happen. And this faith must be in the grace of God. So by saying faith alone grace is required and implied, however this doesnt work for grace alone because it has nothing to do with what the person does, i.e. it is a given.

So what am I missing?


#2

So by saying faith alone grace is required and implied, however this doesnt work for grace alone because it has nothing to do with what the person does, i.e. it is a given.

Exactly, we are saved not by what we do, but only by the grace of God.

Faith alone seems to take God out of the picture almost entirely, by reducing salvation to an matter of the intellect.

Grace alone, on the other hand, implies that we are saved only by God’s love and his constant effort to draw us to him.


#3

If you’re looking for the Catholic position on this (I’m assuming you are), then the idea of grace alone, if properly understood, is in accordance with Catholic doctrine, but the idea of faith alone is not. I can say I am saved by grace alone because faith is a gift from God, the works I do are performed in and through and because of God’s grace, and the sacraments convey God’s grace to me. I don’t think that makes it sound like everybody is saved no matter what because people can choose to reject the grace God extends to us.


#4

[quote=Jeremy]Exactly, we are saved not by what we do, but only by the grace of God.

Faith alone seems to take God out of the picture almost entirely, by reducing salvation to an matter of the intellect.

Grace alone, on the other hand, implies that we are saved only by God’s love and his constant effort to draw us to him.
[/quote]

This is because of the Protestant’s limited understanding of faith. Ask an Orthodox Jew what faith is, and it is NOT intellectual belief in the promises of God. Faith is obedience. It means living the will of God every moment of every day of your life. That is why Jesus says, “Not everyone who calls out ‘Lord, Lord’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of the Father.”

Here is another way to explain faith, from the Catholic persective. If you have a faithful wife, do you want a woman who acknowledges your promises, or a woman who is loyal and obedient (no egg throwing please). I want a loyal, unwavering, obedient, humble wife who ALSO believes in me. Do you think God demands anything less?


#5

Ephesians 2 says it all (read the most poignant part of it in my signature quote below).

It is only by the grace of God we are saved, through faith.


#6

[quote=awalt]Ephesians 2 says it all (read the most poignant part of it in my signature quote below).

It is only by the grace of God we are saved, through faith.
[/quote]

I dont understand what you are getting at. Like I said in the first post I dont see the need for grace alone if you have faith alone.


#7

Faith alone leaves out works, however, whereas grace alone is more inclusive. Faith alone implies that by assenting to Christ intellectually, you are saved. Grace alone implies that it is grace that we are saved, and it is through faith and good works that we receive such graces. Faith without works is dead, and works without faith are empty; it is grace that gives meaning to both of these and makes them meritorious.


#8

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