Different Bibles


#1

By my understanding Eastern Catholics use different bibles.
For example:-
Armenian Catholics would use Armenian edition
Byzantine Catholics would use Greek edition
Roman Catholics would use Roman edition
(each of them are a little bit different)
I just want to ask you where does it say in the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches or in Canon law of the Catholic Church that each catholic church is allowed to use its own edition of the bible?

I was able to find this in CCEC, but does ecclesiastical mean the whole catholic church or specific church like Ukrainian catholic?

§3. For liturgical and catechetical purposes only editions of the Sacred Scripture with ecclesiastical approval may be used; other editions must have at least ecclesiastical permission.


#2

[quote="m_p_w, post:1, topic:447271"]
By my understanding Eastern Catholics use different bibles.
For example:-
Armenian Catholics would use Armenian edition
Byzantine Catholics would use Greek edition
Roman Catholics would use Roman edition
(each of them are a little bit different)
I just want to ask you where does it say in the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches or in Canon law of the Catholic Church that each catholic church is allowed to use its own edition of the bible?

I was able to find this in CCEC, but does ecclesiastical mean the whole catholic church or specific church like Ukrainian catholic?

§3. For liturgical and catechetical purposes only editions of the Sacred Scripture with ecclesiastical approval may be used; other editions must have at least ecclesiastical permission.

[/quote]

We all have the same bible.
As far as the editions in regards to language it is different but the content is the same. It is in Aramaic there is no English translation of it. It is equivalent to the Latin Vulgate. The closest translation is the Douay rheims bible.
King James version is lacking books. But that is another topic.


#3

Does the Ethiopian Catholic Church use the Biblical canon of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo church which has 85 books, including the Book of Enoch, in their Bible?


#4

[quote="Michael85, post:3, topic:447271"]
Does the Ethiopian Catholic Church use the Biblical canon of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo church which has 85 books, including the Book of Enoch, in their Bible?

[/quote]

forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=4711831&postcount=9


#5

It applies to each individual Church.

Unfortunately, the Maronites have abandoned the Peshitta after the recent liturgical reforms this century. The Anglophone part of the Church uses some weird obscure English version simply because the copyright allowed the Maronites to change the text as desire - it was going to be the NAB, but they objected to changing the text as desired.


#6

[quote="Eliazer, post:2, topic:447271"]
We all have the same bible.
As far as the editions in regards to language it is different but the content is the same. It is in Aramaic there is no English translation of it. It is equivalent to the Latin Vulgate. The closest translation is the Douay rheims bible.
King James version is lacking books. But that is another topic.

[/quote]

I'm pretty sure Eastern Catholic Bibles are larger than the Roman canon.


#7

[quote="Kmon23, post:6, topic:447271"]
I'm pretty sure Eastern Catholic Bibles are larger than the Roman canon.

[/quote]

They are the same.


#8

[quote="MorEphrem, post:5, topic:447271"]
It applies to each individual Church.

Unfortunately, the Maronites have abandoned the Peshitta after the recent liturgical reforms this century. The Anglophone part of the Church uses some weird obscure English version simply because the copyright allowed the Maronites to change the text as desire - it was going to be the NAB, but they objected to changing the text as desired.

[/quote]

Good thing the NAB was not accepted. And good thing that it was not changed as desired because as Catholics we are forbidden to change it to our own desires it must be intact and unchanged.

The Latin rite have the douay-rheims Catholic bible.
Which is the literal translated version from the Latin vulgate.


#9

[quote="Eliazer, post:7, topic:447271"]
They are the same.

[/quote]

Then how come Eastern Catholics use differently canonized bibles (they are canonized according to their specific rite)?
By my understanding they are supposed to be canonized differently because of liturgical and catechetical purposes of specific rite.


#10

[quote="Eliazer, post:7, topic:447271"]
They are the same.

[/quote]

MorEphrem already answered this - It applies to each individual Church.


#11

[quote="Eliazer, post:7, topic:447271"]
They are the same.

[/quote]

I still will have to disagree with you. There are Eastern Catholics out there I've seen who say they have kept the same canon of scripture with their Orthodox counterparts (if there is one), especially during my time on an Eastern Catholic forums.

Although it is true they will use a Roman canon translation in America primarily due to availability of a translation for liturgical use.


#12

[quote="m_p_w, post:9, topic:447271"]
Then how come Eastern Catholics use differently canonized bibles (they are canonized according to their specific rite)?
By my understanding they are supposed to be canonized differently because of liturgical and catechetical purposes of specific rite.

[/quote]

You are right.
I would have to search this information


#13

[quote="Eliazer, post:8, topic:447271"]
... as Catholics we are forbidden to change it to our own desires it must be intact and unchanged.

[/quote]

Nonsense! Any Catholic can modify the text of Scripture to fit it with prayers, especially if you're in a patriarchal or metropolitan synod translating your own liturgical books.


#14

[quote="Augustine, post:13, topic:447271"]
Nonsense! Any Catholic can modify the text of Scripture to fit it with prayers, especially if you're in a patriarchal or metropolitan synod translating your own liturgical books.

[/quote]

What I mean. Is that we catholics cannot change it according to our feelings that is what I mean.


#15

They have a different Canon true. But the books are the same. They are in different order.


#16

[quote="m_p_w, post:1, topic:447271"]
By my understanding Eastern Catholics use different bibles.
For example:-
Armenian Catholics would use Armenian edition
Byzantine Catholics would use Greek edition
Roman Catholics would use Roman edition
(each of them are a little bit different)
I just want to ask you where does it say in the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches or in Canon law of the Catholic Church that each catholic church is allowed to use its own edition of the bible?

I was able to find this in CCEC, but does ecclesiastical mean the whole catholic church or specific church like Ukrainian catholic?

§3. For liturgical and catechetical purposes only editions of the Sacred Scripture with ecclesiastical approval may be used; other editions must have at least ecclesiastical permission.

[/quote]

The Byzantine Catholic Church (USA) currently uses the 1970 New American Bible and the 1962 Grail Psalms for liturgy. There may be occasional changes to reflect the original Greek.


#17

[LIST]
[/LIST]

[quote="Eliazer, post:15, topic:447271"]
They have a different Canon true. But the books are the same. They are in different order.

[/quote]

Yet I have heard the Prayer of Manasseh is used liturgically in Byzantine Catholic Churches. Also the usage of Psalms 151 (only used in private prayer for both EC and Orthodox) And also that 3 Maccabees is included for some Eastern Catholics as well (as far as I know, not read liturgically and neither for the Orthodox).


#18

[quote="Eliazer, post:15, topic:447271"]
They have a different Canon true. But the books are the same. They are in different order.

[/quote]

No. Not always. Many Eastern Canons are longer. Some include books that Latins would consider edifying but not canon.


#19

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