Different Catholics?

[quote=leschornmom]So, are the priests in the eastern rite allowed to marry or not?

If some one want’s to become catholic. How do they know what rite they should believe in or is it all the same as far as the Catholic Church is concerned?

Before I ask this question I feel that I should let you kno that I am NOT being sarcastic.

I have always been taught that there has to be one true church. If the catholic Church is the one true church why does it accept so many branches that believe differently. As an LDS we are taught that we are the only true church of God…that he restored the gospel on this earth…There are many other religions that claim to be Momon but they are not accepted by the LDS church. Is that the case with all of these “rites” or are they truly accepted by the catholics.

again I am not being sarcastic. So please don’t take it that way I really want to know.
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The priests in most eastern rites are allowed to marry. This is a discipline that is up to the bishops of the eastern rite. This does not make the traditions of the west any worse or less. The east is allowed to self govern.

The eastern Catholic Church and the western Catholic Church are the same church. If you would decide one day to become Catholic, you could join any right you want. They are all regarded equally and they all profess the same faith.

All these rites are accepted by the Catholic Church. They are all part of the same body and they all believe the same thing. There is one faith, one church. When there is a meeting of the bishops of the Catholic Church as a whole, there are bishops of all different rites and if they vote on something, they all vote.

[quote=leschornmom]Hesychios, Thank you so much for the back ground I certainly didn’t know about all the history your church claims. It definately explains the different rites in your church with out lessoning their position in the church. Does the Roman Catholic Church claim that any particular apostle lead it orriginally?
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Peter was the head of the apostles and he started all the different patriarchs(there were three at the time). James was the first bishop of Jerusalem. Peter was the first bishop of Rome and I think Andrew(not sure of this one) was the first bishop of Antioch.

[quote=jimmy] Peter was the first bishop of Rome and I think Andrew(not sure of this one) was the first bishop of Antioch.
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Greetings Jimmy,

Andrew (known as the “first called” and brother of Peter) established the line of bishops at Byzantium (among other places, presumably), later that city became Constantinople and it’s bishops became patriarchs.

He probably passed through Antioch any number of times, but he is not thought to have led the church there.

[quote=Hesychios]Greetings Jimmy,

Andrew (known as the “first called” and brother of Peter) established the line of bishops at Byzantium (among other places, presumably), later that city became Constantinople and it’s bishops became patriarchs.

He probably passed through Antioch any number of times, but he is not thought to have led the church there.
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Who was the head of the Church of Antioch?

[quote=jimmy]Who was the head of the Church of Antioch?
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Peter first (before he went to Rome, but after he left Jerusalem).

Then Euodius. After Euodius it would be Ignatius.

It should also bee remembered that the succeeding bishops probably knew each other in life, being close to the same age they served until they died or were exhiled.

Ignatius probably knew Peter pretty well from the earlier days, also John and Paul.

There are lists of the Patriarchs of Antioch on the web, all start with Peter.

This prepresents the earliest set, when the Patriarchate was unified.

Thanks

I am amazed at you knowledge of the history of the church…did you go to Catholic school or have you just studied all of this on your own?

[quote=leschornmom]I have read a few different forums refering to the Roman Catholic church, the Latin and the Eastern…What do all of these mean? Are they all the same church, or are they all branches of the catholic church? Or am I completely off and the other two have nothing to do with the Catholic Church?
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See here:

Catholic Rites and Churches
ewtn.com/expert/answers/catholic_rites_and_churches.htm

That sounds like a general question for everyone, so perhaps the others could weigh in on this too… all of my education was in public schools in Illinois.

But there are plenty of sources in the bookmarket for further study. That’s where I learned, all independent reading and asking questions like you do.

If it was a general question, I learned what I know on my own. I went to a Catholic school for first through fifth grade but I did not learn anything of church history until I started doing my own reading a couple years ago.

But, I think the question was directed toward you Hesychios.

:slight_smile: It was a pretty general question. I was raised LDS by a single convert mother. She knows less about the church at this point then I do. I have learned most of what I know about my religion (which still isn’t much) on my own and I just wondered if the Catholic church did a better job of educating their youth in the History of their the church.

[quote=leschornmom]:slight_smile: It was a pretty general question. I was raised LDS by a single convert mother. She knows less about the church at this point then I do. I have learned most of what I know about my religion (which still isn’t much) on my own and I just wondered if the Catholic church did a better job of educating their youth in the History of their the church.
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Most Catholics who know there faith have learned it on there own. The church needs to teach more about the history and what the early church believed. The would be much less people leaving.

[quote=leschornmom]:slight_smile: It was a pretty general question. I was raised LDS by a single convert mother. She knows less about the church at this point then I do. I have learned most of what I know about my religion (which still isn’t much) on my own and I just wondered if the Catholic church did a better job of educating their youth in the History of their the church.
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Thats interesting, I became a catholic as an adult and know more about the history of the church as well as our doctine than my cradle catholic wife does. Also, we now attend a dofferent parish and is is amazing at how different it is from the one I was confirmed in. This parish has an enormous amount of opportunities for adults to continue learning about the faith. They have special talks about a particular topic once or twice a month, bible studies, and a full library. We also have a book store/gift shop where you will find a wealth of catholic books and tapes.

I guess it depends on how each parish is run whether or not you will find these educational opportunities.

If it was a general question, I learned what I know on my own.

I don’t rightly know what this means … “on my own.” If you mean you had to continue your education as an adult, then I agree. But you must have had a teacher, either in person or the authors of some books that you have accepted as orthodox, or most likely both.

If you asked what the average person learned of mathematics in kindergarten through 12th grade, they will likely tell you they learned very little. But objectively speaking, they were probably taught all they needed to know, but *remembered *very little, or simply did not pay attention when it was being taught.

In the words of the Ethiopian eunuch who was asked by St. Philip, “‘Do you understand what you are reading?’ He replied, ‘How can I, unless someone instructs me?’” (Acts 8:30-31). Nobody learns the Catholic faith “on their own” in my opinion. Most of us have had many teachers. Some good. Some not so good. And so, as adults, we have had to actually study the Catholic faith more deeply, since our perspective of what we were taught in school is that they taught us nothing. But, realistically, anything we learned in K-12 school, if we truly wanted to understand it more deeply or simply re-learn what the nuns actually told us but were too obstinent to pay any attention, then it is certainly necessary to continue our education as adults. Catholicism is no different in this respect than mathematics.

“On my own” I’ve enrolled in Catholic Distance University (cdu.edu/), seeking a Master’s in Religious Education. :wink: But more accurately, I’m learning about my Catholic faith from the priests and professors at CDU.

There are many opportunities given by the Church to learn from the teachers of the Church. The Knights of Columbus offer free online course and resources here: kofc.org/publications/cis/index.cfm

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