Different mass forms?


#1

I’ve seen people on here talk about different mass forms…I think EF is one. Can someone explain the difference forms to me and what each involves/the difference between them? Thanks :slight_smile:


#2

I would love that info too;)


#3

:popcorn::
Let’s hope this will be an objective discussion of the different mass forms and not a “what form is better or superior” thread

Mary.


#4

vatican.va/roman_curia/pontifical_commissions/ecclsdei/documents/rc_com_ecclsdei_doc_20110430_istr-universae-ecclesiae_en.html


#5

The following is a bit of an oversimplification, but here goes.

There are two forms of Mass that are said in the Latin Rite: the Extraordinary Form, and the Ordinary Form. The former is said in Latin, and is the traditional Mass of the Latin Rite. The latter was introduced by Vatican II and was developed in the years following. It is said in the vernacular tongue, and is in other ways different from the Extraordinary Form in structure and discipline. Some of these differences are that the priest now faces the people instead of the tabernacle (ad orientem), the Eucharist is placed into the hand of the communicant instead of the mouth, and more modern-style music is used as opposed to the Gregorian chants of the EF. The EF is sometimes called the Tridentine Mass, the Latin Mass, or the Traditional Mass.


#6

I would change it from the Eucharist *is *placed in the hand of the communicant to, the Eucharist is *allowed *to be placed in the hand.


#7

There is also the Anglican Use form of the Mass, which is part of the Latin Rite.

Although the new Ordinariate form is new, it is just as legitimate as the OF or EF and also the Anglican Use Mass that has been in existence for over 30 years, I don’t know if the Anglican Use parishes not part of the Ordinariate are using the new Mass or not.

Any Catholic can fulfill their Sunday obligation at these Masses.

Yours in the Hearts of Jesus and Mary

Bernadette


#8

My apologies. You are correct, Mary.


#9

Technically, the term “Latin Mass” refers to both EF and OF. The OF can be held in Latin, although it’s usually in the vernacular language. The EF strictly follows the 1962 Missal, which has certain requirements including postures and language, while the OF has more leeway in things such as hymn choice, language, and readings which include more Old Testament.


#10

I know, but the EF is colloquially called the Latin Mass by a vast number.

The EF strictly follows the 1962 Missal, which has certain requirements including postures and language, while the OF has more leeway in things such as hymn choice, language, and readings which include more Old Testament.

All true. I did say that my post was an oversimplification, after all. :wink:


#11

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