Dignity in death?


#1

allnurses.com/nursing-articles/patient-i-failed-329686.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=FB&utm_campaign=The+Patient

I have worked hospice and know how peacful a life passing can be. I have worked in an ICU and seen the horror "medical intervention" can inflict. I have also seen the Lord use medical intervention to save a lives and offer new chances. I am curious what the Catholic Church's official stance on compassionate care for the dying is...


#2

[quote="Heather_Lee, post:1, topic:232194"]
allnurses.com/nursing-articles/patient-i-failed-329686.html?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=FB&utm_campaign=The+Patient

I have worked hospice and know how peacful a life passing can be. I have worked in an ICU and seen the horror "medical intervention" can inflict. I have also seen the Lord use medical intervention to save a lives and offer new chances. I am curious what the Catholic Church's official stance on compassionate care for the dying is...

[/quote]

Hello Heather Lee, :)

You may find reading the Declaration on Euthanasia helpful:

SACRED CONGREGATION FOR THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH

DECLARATION ON EUTHANASIA

"When inevitable death is imminent in spite of the means used, it is permitted in conscience to take the decision to refuse forms of treatment that would only secure a precarious and burdensome prolongation of life, so long as the normal care due to the sick person in similar cases is not interrupted. In such circumstances the doctor has no reason to reproach himself with failing to help the person in danger."

vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cfaith/documents/rc_con_cfaith_doc_19800505_euthanasia_en.html

Peace,

Abba


#3

When I first started working in an ER I wondered the same thing. I was able to go to talks which have explained these teachings. I will try to explain them and then offer a link. Basically, everything is done by a case by case basis, and measured in extraordinary means and ordinary means. For example, a young person is suffering a severe asthma attack, so bad that the patient needs to be intubation as there O2 sats are dropping. This is an ordinary mean in this case. However, a 99 year old mean who has metastatic lung cancer that has ravaged his body becomes hypoxic, in this case, because he has cancer that will kill him and began doing that years ago, to intubate in this case would be extraordinary. I hope that made some sense.

One of the best places to go for these resources is the National Catholic Resource Center.
ncbcenter.org/NetCommunity//
Here are two articles:
ncbcenter.org/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?pid=1025

I have only met one of the people who work there Fr. Ted and he is amazing. You can also call them if you have more questions. Hope that helps


#4

As Jackiem stated it is something of a case by case thing. We are not permitted to “hasten the end” but neither are we required to cling to life beyond reason.
We are to administer ordinary care, see to it that they have the sacraments so long as they are able, make them as comfortable as we can, and pray that they have a good and peaceful passing over.
In my opinion, and I would advise this to anyone, this is something that needs to be discussed by family members with their pastor. He likely knows the people and paticulars better than anyone else and can provide the best spiritual guidance.

ER’s and ICU’s can indeed provide amazing results but like you say they can also provide horror. In this I do not blame them. It is just that their training and focus is different than the hospice setting.

I admire greatly the work done by Hospice. My father was under “in home” hospice care for the last six months of his life (Alzheimer’s) and my mother had nothing but great things to say about them.
I will gladly trust my lady to them when her time comes (also Alzheimer’s).

Peace
James


#5

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