Disabled veteran seeks healthcare job


#1

Hi,

I am about to retire from the military and will be seeking a new job. I have a bachelor's degree, and am thinking about a job in healthcare. The trick is, I am disabled - I walk with a cane and can only do so much on my feet.

I am a caring, somewhat sensitive individual who works well with people one on one. I wanted to be a nurse, but since my accident, I don't think I can due to the physical work involved.

Any suggestions? I am open to going to school to retrain. The Veteran's Administration is paying.


#2

Hmmmm, I have to say this is a tricky one. I've only ever have worked in healthcare and honestly every single job I've ever held has involved long hours on my feet with lots of lifting, which is probably why my back is already shot at the age of 26. :shrug:

If you get a job as a nurse at a doctor's office, I bet it involves less walking and physcial requirements then at the hospital. Pretty much all hospital jobs that involve lots of patient contact will involve lots of walking. I have a friend at work that works as the secretary at the nurse's station because he used to be a contractor but blew his knees out so can't walk for long either. He wanted to work in healthcare so it was a good fit for him, but I have to say it doesn't involve much patient contact. It's mostly answering the phones, coordinating lots of the "behind the scenes" stuff at the nurse's station, no real patient contact.

Phlebotomy at an outpatient lab doesn't involve a whole lot of walking and does have patient contact, but this job doesn't pay nearly as well as being a nurse.

sorry I can't think of more, maybe someone else without a preggo brain can think of something I'm not thinking of? :p


#3

A pharmacist position is a good way to interact with people as you help them with medical and medicinal issues. Maybe you could pursue that. Your attention to detail and adherence to protocols would come in handy. Just know there might be issues about dispensing certain medicines that might violate your conscience and find places to work that would honor your conscience and rights thereof.

Thank you for your service.


#4

Social work may be a great way to go and the VA is practically begging for them.


#5

Out of curiosity, have you checked in with a bloodbank? They might be able to provide some guidance in terms of educational requirements, etc.

You could always go to medical school and be a doctor. Surgeons are on their feet a lot, some specialties involved in and around physical therapy require heavy lifting, but other specialties are not.


#6

As a vet, you'd have special credibility among your fellow vets.


#7

[quote="joandarc2008, post:4, topic:178137"]
Social work may be a great way to go and the VA is practically begging for them.

[/quote]

I,d shoot for that also as the need is great..The plus is having someone that loves the Lord praying/ministering to them(even though your speech is limited..More sitting then standing I would presume..Thanks for your service also..


#8

My uncle is disabled, hip replacement…, but works with troubled and drug addicted youths in New Hampshire. He was a rip roaring alcoholic for years, got straight and then a degree. He use’s what he knows to get through to these kids. What do you know? The fact that you are disabled and use a cane may help break down defensive walls. May be a true gift.


#9

Networking is a great way to get a job. Do you want to work in a hospital? Volunteer there and get to know people on the inside.


#10

Most jobs in the hospital involve much walking. As other posters have suggested, i would explore social work, sw are needed in so many areas of health care and the community and doesn’t require necessarily a lot of walking. Pharmacy is a good area to get in to but also involves long periods of standing, though not necessarily walking distances and no lifting. Medical records/coding jobs are not labor intensive and pay fairly well. Nursing offers tremendous opportunities though most jobs require walking, standing for long periods and lifting. I am a nurse and have basically a desk job, though i worked for years as a staff nurse so i would have the knowledge to do what i do now.


#11

Maybe be a pediatrician? Kids are generally light weight-ish... I think that if The Little Couple wife can do it and she is 3' tall you can do it.


#12

[quote="creationlover, post:1, topic:178137"]
Hi,

I am about to retire from the military and will be seeking a new job. I have a bachelor's degree, and am thinking about a job in healthcare. The trick is, I am disabled - I walk with a cane and can only do so much on my feet.

I am a caring, somewhat sensitive individual who works well with people one on one. I wanted to be a nurse, but since my accident, I don't think I can due to the physical work involved.

Any suggestions? I am open to going to school to retrain. The Veteran's Administration is paying.

[/quote]

My sister-in-law worked as a nurse for many years.

But she now has problems and gets around with a cane. I'm not sure exactly what she does but she now does IT related work and program administrative work for various social/outreach programs. If I were you , I'd look into IT for hospitals or insurance companies.

What did you do for the military?


#13

[quote="mayrag86, post:11, topic:178137"]
Maybe be a pediatrician? Kids are generally light weight-ish... I think that if The Little Couple wife can do it and she is 3' tall you can do it.

[/quote]

Above is true? However, med school is grueling and so is the 3 year pediatric residency with long hours - requires much physical stamina.


#14

[quote="dachsiemom, post:13, topic:178137"]
Above is true? However, med school is grueling and so is the 3 year pediatric residency with long hours - requires much physical stamina.

[/quote]

yes, doctors are on their feet very much as well, can't see patients sitting behind a desk sitting down. ;) also, the residency as dachsiemom said is very grueling, like 48 hour shifts and the like.

Honestly, the pharmacist suggestion is a good one, they do stand a lot but not a lot of walking.

To be honest, most jobs in the medical field require lots of walking because how can you possibly take care of people sitting down? Overall, it is a very physical line of work period. Sorry I can't be more help to the OP. :shrug::o


#15

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#16

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#17

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