Discerning Mortal and Venial Sins

If you struggle with scrupulosity, and are not sure whether a certain act you have already committed is a mortal or venial sin, wouldn’t it mean that the sin is definitely NOT mortal sin, because mortal sin requires full knowledge and full and free consent of the will? Wouldn’t it be impossible to commit a mortal sin and not know it immediately? thank you for your help.

For me I for sure know if I commit a mortal sin. I think anyone knows for sure. If you struggle with scrupulosity and you are not sure it seems to me it probably is not a mortal sin…having said that we need to have a well formed conciense based on Church teaching

[quote=Nick]If you struggle with scrupulosity, and are not sure whether a certain act you have already committed is a mortal or venial sin, wouldn’t it mean that the sin is definitely NOT mortal sin, because mortal sin requires full knowledge and full and free consent of the will? Wouldn’t it be impossible to commit a mortal sin and not know it immediately? thank you for your help.
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If you want a check list which you can go through every day when you examine your conscience to at least have a good idea if what you have done is a mortal or venial sin go to website:

www.catholic.org/frz/examen/mortal_main.htm

The first section is on mortal sins and then you can scroll down and click on the venial sins/imperfections section.

Nice list…a bit extreme (joining the masons)…does anyone really join a group like that? I guess they do or it wouldn’t be listed. I like it when the list goes by the 10 commandments, I think it helps to clarify things sometimes.

[quote=BlestOne]Nice list…a bit extreme (joining the masons)…does anyone really join a group like that? I guess they do or it wouldn’t be listed. I like it when the list goes by the 10 commandments, I think it helps to clarify things sometimes.
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It is still prohibited for Catholics to join the Masons. I hardly think a list that echoes Church teaching could be considered extreme.

[quote=BlestOne]Nice list…a bit extreme (joining the masons)…does anyone really join a group like that?
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Yes. The Catholic mayor of my town, who is also the president of our parish council. And yes, he receives communion. Go figure. :confused:

Oh My…I didn’t think any Catholics joined the masons…Go Figure is right! Never would have believed it…

It’s good to see some people who don’t read Radical Traditionalist websites.

“The church is full of Masons!” More evidence, less conspiracy theory.

Nick

When in doubt ask a priest as I did yesterday. As in some cases it might depend on your knowledge and particular situation.

PS I’ve been warned about scrupulosity.

[quote=Nick]If you struggle with scrupulosity, and are not sure whether a certain act you have already committed is a mortal or venial sin, wouldn’t it mean that the sin is definitely NOT mortal sin, because mortal sin requires full knowledge and full and free consent of the will? Wouldn’t it be impossible to commit a mortal sin and not know it immediately? thank you for your help.
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You are obliged to confess KNOWN mortal sins by kind and number. That is it. Finito. If you are dealing with a sin where you doubt you considered what you were doing or you doubt you knew the gravity, etc., then you are not obliged to confess it. *

I don’t think a scrupulous person should go every week with a list of 10 things they suspect are mortal, but aren’t sure. If you are like that, go to one confessor regularly, let him get to know that you are like that, and follow his advice, not just for the one particular sin of that day, but on how to confess whenever you find yourself in knots. Do what he says.

Nick, if after making a good, honest confession, you later grow doubful about it somehow, that *maybe you failed to say some sin or another, it is fine. You do not need to fuss. If you absolutely know you forgot to mention a mortal sin, then mention it at your next confession, but your confession was a good confession and you can go to communion.

[quote=Pug]You are obliged to confess KNOWN mortal sins by kind and number. That is it. Finito. If you are dealing with a sin where you doubt you considered what you were doing or you doubt you knew the gravity, etc., then you are not obliged to confess it. *

I don’t think a scrupulous person should go every week with a list of 10 things they suspect are mortal, but aren’t sure. If you are like that, go to one confessor regularly, let him get to know that you are like that, and follow his advice, not just for the one particular sin of that day, but on how to confess whenever you find yourself in knots. Do what he says.

Nick, if after making a good, honest confession, you later grow doubful about it somehow, that *maybe **you failed to say some sin or another, it is fine. You do not need to fuss. If you absolutely know you forgot to mention a mortal sin, then mention it at your next confession, but your confession was a good confession and you can go to communion.

I affirm this with my Baptismal Priesthood blessing.
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[quote=paramedicgirl]Yes. The Catholic mayor of my town, who is also the president of our parish council. And yes, he receives communion. Go figure. :confused:
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Anyone who is a member of the Masons is in a state of mortal sin and cannot receive communion. Receiving the host while not in a state of grace is an empty gesture and the real presence will not be there. If someone anyway receives the host in such a circumstance it is simply for their own public image but is meaningless. Also receiving the communion while not in a state of grace is also a mortal sin.

[quote=thistle]Receiving the host while not in a state of grace is an empty gesture and the real presence will not be there. If someone anyway receives the host in such a circumstance it is simply for their own public image but is meaningless
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I’m not sure quite where you meant to go with this. The typical Catholic teaching is that the real presence is there and it stays there until the host decays or dissolves. It is not dependent upon the faith/morals of the person touching the host. Are you intending to talk about the duration of the real presence or are you talking about whether a mortal sinner can commune with Christ or not?

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