Dispelling Opus Dei Rumors


#1

Sombody told me (and I’m hoping some folks can help inform me on this) that the Female Opus Dei member have to go in “through the back door.” My first quesiton is “what door and where?” It just sounds like more wierd rumors, but I don’t know for sure. I will say he didn’t know if the MEN also entered through the back… haha


#2

Their website is here:
opusdei.org/

Contact information (right hand side of the screen)
opusdei.org/art.php?w=32&s=494


#3

I’ve got questions too. I had been looking into secular and third orders among other things to join when I pondered Opus Dei.

I have decided that maybe the best course of action is to take advantage of their “contact us” and ask them directly for an answer to the question at hand, if it is not addressed in the website, or if the answer still leaves questions.

This is what I’m going to do about the trouble I have with corporal mortification in the form of the “cilice” (spiked chain-like thing certain members wear two hours daily) and “discipline” (whip like thing for self-flagellation). In my case, these things are disturbing in that I know that Christ deprived himself of things like food when fasting, and sleep. However, I cannot recall when he imposed deliberate pain in such a manner. It is troubling to me and I’m trying to understand it, even though I’m no longer considering membership.


#4

Sombody told me (and I’m hoping some folks can help inform me on this) that the Female Opus Dei member have to go in “through the back door.” My first quesiton is “what door and where?” It just sounds like more wierd rumors, but I don’t know for sure.

:smiley: :whacky: Thanks for the laugh! I really laughed out loud when I read this! I am a Supernumerary member of Opus Dei, and I can tell you that there is no way that female Opus Dei members have to go in through the back door! Actually, there are separate centers for men and women (quite logically, since the members of each who life in the centers are celibate, and it simply is good sense not to put temptation in the way :wink: ).

So, since there are separate centers, the women enter through the front door of their center, and the men through the front door of theirs. And, when men visit the women’s center, or women the men’s center (such as, when I accompany my husband when we ar out together and he wants to speak with a priest, or at Christmas when the women’s center has a family get-together) we all enter through the front door.

Ah! Now I realize what the person who told this to the O.P. is getting at! There are women (Assistant Numeraries) who live in the women’s center, whose vocation is the care and upkeep of centers of Opus Dei. These women clean the men’s center and cook for them, and when they go there, they enter through the back door. Quite logical, really - they work primarily in the kitchen. Letting themselves in through the back door means that they do not need to disturb any of the men living there, and can go about their work quickly and easily.

This is what I’m going to do about the trouble I have with corporal mortification in the form of the “cilice” (spiked chain-like thing certain members wear two hours daily) and “discipline” (whip like thing for self-flagellation).

Don’t worry! Only Numerary members (those who are celibate and live in one of the centers) have any requirement to use the cilice or the discipline, and their use of these mortifications is strictly under the guidance of their Spiritual Director. Physical mortification is a longstanding tradition in the Church. It is only in the soft 20th and 21st Centuries that we cringe from such ideas. But, we are all still called to mortification. Supernumerary members, and Co-operators (who are not members) are urged to do such things as forego that delicious dessert :yup: , or use less sugar in your tea or coffee, or smile and say a pleasant “good morning” to that co-worker who annoys you so easily :wink: .

Opus Dei is a wonderful way to holiness, and it’s priests are some of the most faithful, holy and knowledgable priests I have ever known. I thank the day I found Opus Dei.


#5

This article should answer most questions…

catholicleague.org/research/opusdei_factandfiction.htm


#6

Joan thanks for the thorough response… I’m obviously not a member, nor do I feel its quite my calling, but I don’t like people using it as a way to bash the church. I know the goal of Opus Dei is to increase the holiness of its members and so it makes sense that Catholics become informed about these aspects so to help put to rest these misstatments about Opus Dei practices.


#7

[quote=Joan M]:smiley: :whacky: Thanks for the laugh! I really laughed out loud when I read this! I am a Supernumerary member of Opus Dei, and I can tell you that there is no way that female Opus Dei members have to go in through the back door! Actually, there are separate centers for men and women (quite logically, since the members of each who life in the centers are celibate, and it simply is good sense not to put temptation in the way :wink: ).

So, since there are separate centers, the women enter through the front door of their center, and the men through the front door of theirs. And, when men visit the women’s center, or women the men’s center (such as, when I accompany my husband when we ar out together and he wants to speak with a priest, or at Christmas when the women’s center has a family get-together) we all enter through the front door.

Ah! Now I realize what the person who told this to the O.P. is getting at! There are women (Assistant Numeraries) who live in the women’s center, whose vocation is the care and upkeep of centers of Opus Dei. These women clean the men’s center and cook for them, and when they go there, they enter through the back door. Quite logical, really - they work primarily in the kitchen. Letting themselves in through the back door means that they do not need to disturb any of the men living there, and can go about their work quickly and easily.

Don’t worry! Only Numerary members (those who are celibate and live in one of the centers) have any requirement to use the cilice or the discipline, and their use of these mortifications is strictly under the guidance of their Spiritual Director. Physical mortification is a longstanding tradition in the Church. It is only in the soft 20th and 21st Centuries that we cringe from such ideas. But, we are all still called to mortification. Supernumerary members, and Co-operators (who are not members) are urged to do such things as forego that delicious dessert :yup: , or use less sugar in your tea or coffee, or smile and say a pleasant “good morning” to that co-worker who annoys you so easily :wink: .

Opus Dei is a wonderful way to holiness, and it’s priests are some of the most faithful, holy and knowledgable priests I have ever known. I thank the day I found Opus Dei.
[/quote]

Hi Joan… Thank you! :clapping: I’m a Co-operator and I want to commend you on the excellent way you answered the posters questions…I always feel a little inadequate… But, I do share what I know. this I know well…

Opus Dei is a wonderful way to holiness, and it’s priests are some of the most faithful, holy and knowledgable priests I have ever known. I thank the day I found Opus Dei

God Bless,
Annunciata:)


#8

[quote]
Quote from Joan:

This is what I’m going to do about the trouble I have with corporal mortification in the form of the “cilice” (spiked chain-like thing certain members wear two hours daily) and “discipline” (whip like thing for self-flagellation).

Don’t worry! Only Numerary members (those who are celibate and live in one of the centers) have any requirement to use the cilice or the discipline, and their use of these mortifications is strictly under the guidance of their Spiritual Director. Physical mortification is a longstanding tradition in the Church. It is only in the soft 20th and 21st Centuries that we cringe from such ideas. But, we are all still called to mortification. Supernumerary members, and Co-operators (who are not members) are urged to do such things as forego that delicious dessert :yup: , or use less sugar in your tea or coffee, or smile and say a pleasant “good morning” to that co-worker who annoys you so easily :wink: .

Opus Dei is a wonderful way to holiness, and it’s priests are some of the most faithful, holy and knowledgable priests I have ever known. I thank the day I found Opus Dei.

[/quote]

But Joan, I AM single so this would apply to me:rotfl:

I couldn’t get passed it so I stopped looking any further at Opus Dei. Granted, I don’t feel it is a bad society, but I’m struggling with how the tradition ever started in the Church in the first place (way back when).

What is eating at me about it (because I had given Opus Dei serious consideration), is that:
[list]
*]I think there is a difference between denying one’s self something (which Christ did many times) and willfully causing one’s self physical pain in the manner that these tools are used (if Christ did anything even similar to himself, please share it with me).
*]I feel it shows lack of respect for the human body. To do something to a fellow human being could be considered sinful, but to inflict physical injury on the self is not?
*]I actually believe some masochist could get sexually aroused with such practice, as rare as that would be.
[/list]If you know of any Opus Dei numeraries that want to try to help me to understand these questions and any other feedback, please get them to post here, or to send me a private message.

I am likely headed the route of Secular Carmelites (and if anyone knows these practices are employed there, please let me know laughs). Otherwise, Secular Franciscans. However, I would like to understand this issue better because it does cause me concerns that it is done in an institution approved by the Church (so obviously she condones the practices). I normally give the Church the benefit of the doubt when I struggle with something and for now, I do that. But I would like to get that understanding.

I don’t think there are any Opus Dei chapters in my area anyway, so it is a moot point, but I would like to better educate myself on the controversy.

Thanks


#9

[quote=Lux_et_veritas]If you know of any Opus Dei numeraries that want to try to help me to understand these questions and any other feedback, please get them to post here, or to send me a private message. …

I don’t think there are any Opus Dei chapters in my area anyway, so it is a moot point, but I would like to better educate myself on the controversy.

[/quote]

Hi Lux,
Here is a very informative site:
interbit.com/blogger/OpusDeiFAQ.html#q24
God Bless


#10

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