Dispensation from Private Vow


#1

Hi!

So here's my situation: I am a college student (22 years old).

I asked the pastor of the parish my parents live in (and where I lived a large chunk of my childhood) to dispense a private vow over my Christmas break. However, I am concerned that the pastor may not have had the authority to dispense the vow, since that parish is no longer my primary residence.

I think I had domicile in this parish, because I lived there for over 5 years. And I don't think I've ever had the intention to never return to the parish. However, I have spent more than 3 months living in a different parish where my college in located. So I think I may have quasi-domicile there--although my residence there has been off and on (since I have gone to my parent's house over school breaks), so I am not sure about that.

If I have quasi-domicile at my school parish, can I still have domicile at my parent's parish? Or does the quasi-domicile replace the previous domicile? Do I need to ask the pastor of my parish up at school to be dispensed of the vow?


#2

If it's a private vow, surely the dispensation is a matter of whether it's appropriate for you and whether a priest of the Church thinks it's the right thing? Would or should a geographical boundary and technicalities over which parish you reside in have any bearing if the dispensation is related to the authority of a priest by virtue of his ordination rather than his location?


#3

[quote="DexUK, post:2, topic:313136"]
If it's a private vow, surely the dispensation is a matter of whether it's appropriate for you and whether a priest of the Church thinks it's the right thing? Would or should a geographical boundary and technicalities over which parish you reside in have any bearing if the dispensation is related to the authority of a priest by virtue of his ordination rather than his location?

[/quote]

Yes it would. Only those with the proper authority over a private vow can dispense it.


#4

It would seem to me that you would have a quasi-domicile at the Parish where you attend school --due to the 3 months and your intent to return (CIC 100, 102.2, 106) and thus --when you where back at your former domicile -- you were a "peregrini" in relation to the Pastor * of that local place (where your parents live)--being away from your quasi-domicile. Thus he would* have the authority to dispense from the private vow (CIC 1196.1).

One can verify all this of course (ones chancery at the diocese can assist one in such areas) --but that is my understanding form the text of the CIC. (Note though I am not a Canon Lawyer...)


#5

You have been dispensed of the private vow you made; the quasi-domicile does not automatically move everything in your religious life, so to speak. Canon Law is generally there to help, not to get caught up on "three months and one day" technicalities, although, as drawn to the Law as the race of man is, it is oft-tempting to do so.

Bookcat's response is correct insofar as I can discern, but, again, neither am I a canon lawyer.


#6

[quote="Khalid, post:5, topic:313136"]
Canon Law is generally there to help, not to get caught up on "three months and one day" technicalities, although, as drawn to the Law as the race of man is, it is oft-tempting to do so.

[/quote]

Tis not a technicallity ....

No authority -- no dispensation.


#7

I edited my post to add my reasoning so I don't come off as an antinomian - that the establishment of a quasi-domicile does not move all of one's religious obligations to location of said quasi-domicile, insofar as I understand it. The original priest, given that said individual maintains at least quasi-domicile or intends to in home parish (assuming it is in home parish), has authority.

My statement about canon law was in large part a reaction to how extremely complicated some make simple actions out to be, which, in this case, is not my impression, although I did read a lawyer, both civil and canon, say that canon law was "the most intricate and subtile system of law" he had ever dealt with, so what do I know?

If in doubt, ask a canon lawyer, or the priest of the parish of your current quasi-domicile.


#8

[quote="Khalid, post:7, topic:313136"]
I edited my post to add my reasoning so I don't come off as an antinomian - that the establishment of a quasi-domicile does not move all of one's religious obligations to location of said quasi-domicile, insofar as I understand it. The original priest, given that said individual maintains at least quasi-domicile or intends to in home parish (assuming it is in home parish), has authority.

My statement about canon law was in large part a reaction to how extremely complicated some make simple actions out to be, which, in this case, is not my impression, although I did read a lawyer, both civil and canon, say that canon law was "the most intricate and subtile system of law" he had ever dealt with, so what do I know?

If in doubt, ask a canon lawyer, or the priest of the parish of your current quasi-domicile.

[/quote]

They are no longer quasi-domicile nor domicile at the old Parish as I understand it -they no longer intend to be there etc.

But as noted in my post above -- such does not effect the question really in my understanding.


#9

Thanks for the responses.

One thing I forgot to mention is that I may not have been in the boundaries of my parent's parish when I was dispensed from the vow. I e-mailed the pastor from my parent's home right before I left to travel to Tulsa, OK. After I got to Tulsa, I checked my email and he had replied. Now, I stayed at my parent's home before and after my trip; I would definitely consider it my primary residence during my winter break. But it may not have been where I was actually residing when the pastor e-mailed me to tell me to consider myself dispensed.

It may just be best to ask the pastor of my school parish to dispense me to ensure that I am dispensed.


#10

[quote="Liz90, post:9, topic:313136"]
Thanks for the responses.

One thing I forgot to mention is that I may not have been in the boundaries of my parent's parish when I was dispensed from the vow. I e-mailed the pastor from my parent's home right before I left to travel to Tulsa, OK. After I got to Tulsa, I checked my email and he had replied. Now, I stayed at my parent's home before and after my trip; I would definitely consider it my primary residence during my winter break. But it may not have been where I was actually residing when the pastor e-mailed me to tell me to consider myself dispensed.

It may just be best to ask the pastor of my school parish to dispense me to ensure that I am dispensed.

[/quote]

Yes such could seem to be problematic....

So yes I would suggest seeking from your Pastor at your local Parish a dispensation... then case closed :)


#11

I still regarded myself as part of my parents' house, even though I hadn't lived with them for nearly 15 years, until I was married. Their parish always considered me "one of theirs" even when I was more regularly attending one near where I was attending school. And besides that, it was my "permanent address" according to the school.


#12

[quote="RedSparklyShoes, post:11, topic:313136"]
I still regarded myself as part of my parents' house, even though I hadn't lived with them for nearly 15 years, until I was married. Their parish always considered me "one of theirs" even when I was more regularly attending one near where I was attending school. And besides that, it was my "permanent address" according to the school.

[/quote]

It is not what the School regards --this is a question of Canon Law --which is very particular.

Being thought of as "one of theirs" does not establish domicile or quasi-domicile.


#13

Can a person get dispensed from a vow via the internet?

Ex:

James Bond sends his local priest an email saying: Hey Father, I made 1000 vows that I want to get dispensed since I have extreme OCD and I forgot them all. Could you dispense me from these promises?

Priest responds: Sure James, don’t worry about them.


:confused:

Sorry if this is uncalled for but it got me thinking…


#14

*Can. 1191 §1. A vow, that is, a deliberate and free promise made to God about a possible and better good, must be fulfilled by reason of the virtue of religion.

**§2. **Unless they are prohibited by law, all who possess suitable use of reason are capable of making a vow.

§3. A vow made out of grave and unjust fear or malice is null by the law itself.

**Can. 1192 §1. **A vow is public if a legitimate superior accepts it in the name of the Church; otherwise, it is private.

**§2. **A vow is solemn if the Church has recognized it as such; otherwise, it is simple.

**§3. *A vow is personal if the person making the vow promises an action; real if the person making the vow promises some thing; mixed if it shares the nature of a personal and a real vow.

**Q: **How is a simple private vow different from a good intention? Does it have to be spoken, directed at God, witnessed by anyone? When does a good intention become binding? Is it possible to rashly make a vow without realizing that it is a sin to break it, or is the realization that the promise is binding required in order to make it a vow?


#15

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