Dispensationalism...


#1

I was wondering about dispensationalism…what is it? Is it biblical? and does the Catholic Church approve of it? I have some protestant friends at work who brought it up and I am confused. I know it has something to do with the Rapture (protestants are big on this subject!). Any info would be helpful!
God bless…


#2

[quote=mainelyned]I was wondering about dispensationalism…what is it? Is it biblical? and does the Catholic Church approve of it? I have some protestant friends at work who brought it up and I am confused. I know it has something to do with the Rapture (protestants are big on this subject!). Any info would be helpful!
God bless…
[/quote]

A great place to start is the Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraphs 668 to 682, where the core, official teachings of the Church about general eschatology-the end of the world-can be found in the space of a few pages.

The Catholic Church, rejects the idea that Jesus failed two thousand years ago. She does not accept the belief that all of the Jews rejected the Messiah. We believe that the Church was a fulfillment and continuation of the work God started with the Jews in the Old Testament. We believe that Christ founded a new and everlasting covenant that both completed and included the Old Covenant.

The Catholic Church has always understood herself as being the New Israel (Gal. 6:16; Eph. 2:11-12), the new People of God (1 Pet. 2:9-10) and the recipients of the New Covenant given through Christ (Heb. 8:8-13). Even Martin Luther and John Calvin understood the Church to be the true heir of Israel. They also would have rejected dispensationalism, which only emerged as a method of biblical interpretation in the last two hundred years or so and has little to do with classical Protestant ideas about the end times.

Catholic doctrine also teaches that the Church is intimately related to the Kingdom of God. The Church is “ultimately one, holy, catholic, and apostolic in her deepest and ultimate identity, because it is in her that ‘the Kingdom of heaven,’ the ‘Reign of God,’ already exists and will be fulfilled at the end of time” (CCC 865). The Kingdom is not yet complete, but began with the Incarnation and will be fully realized at the end of time: “The kingdom of heaven was inaugurated on earth by Christ. ‘This kingdom shone out before men in the word, in the works and in the presence of Christ.’ The Church is the seed and beginning of this kingdom. Its keys are entrusted to Peter” (CCC 567). In its fullness, the Kingdom is not an earthly reign, but the final triumph of Christ over the power of sin and Satan, culminating in an eternity spent in communion with the Triune God. “The kingdom has come in the person of Christ and grows mysteriously in the hearts of those incorporated into him, until its full eschatological manifestation” (CCC 865).

Although the Church has never formally condemned the idea of a pretribulation Rapture, she tacitly rejects it based on her doctrine of the Church, which is completely at odds with dispensationalism. It has always been Catholic teaching that Jesus Christ will physically and visibly return to earth. As is said in the Creed each week at Eucharistic Liturgy, “He will come again in glory to judge the living and the dead, and his kingdom will have no end” (cf. CCC 681-682).


#3

This article in This Rock talks a little about dispensationalism: www.catholic.com/thisrock/1999/9904fea1.asp


#4

Another good Article I just read…Rapture Theology


#5

Visit Carl Olsens website. He has written the book “Will Catholics Be Left Behind” and has posted several of his articles dealing with this subject.

carl-olson.com/wcblb_home.html


#6

You mean I won’t get to dissapear and escape from my problems while all you catholics will be following the anti-christ (the Pope) and the Whore of Babylon (The Roman Catholic Church) for the next 7 years before Jesus come to zap your eyeballs out!:bigyikes:

I kid you not I have gotten this response before.:smiley:


#7

mainelyned,
A good reference for what you’re asking is covered thoroughly in Paul Thigpen’s book Rapture Trap. Thigpen relates how John Darby starts to spread the thought in the mid-19th Century after being disgruntled with Catholicism and mainline Protestantism.


#8

Marie: I read that the opposite of dispensationalism is the idea of “covenant theology” which I believe the Church leans more to. Scott Hahn is big on covenants…I’ve read 3 of his books and he constantly talks about covenants. Does our Church embrace the ‘covenant theology’ idea?

God bless…


#9

[quote=mainelyned]Marie: I read that the opposite of dispensationalism is the idea of “covenant theology” which I believe the Church leans more to. Scott Hahn is big on covenants…I’ve read 3 of his books and he constantly talks about covenants. Does our Church embrace the ‘covenant theology’ idea?

God bless…
[/quote]

Oh boy Scott Hahn is the man concerning Revelation I have his cd set on the Book of Revelation wow!
Learn more things relevant to your faith on that cd than all the psuedo end times non-sense out there in the evangelical churchs.


#10

There are many, many different thoughts related to the end-times, both in Catholic and Protestant circles. After listening and reading many of these alternatives, the inevitable result is CONFUSION. I have therefore taken the position that “Christ has died, Christ has risen, and Christ will come again”. As to how or when His coming will happen is surely a mystery to us (and to Christ as well) all. I know in my own spirit that the Father has the plan and even though he is not saying what it is, I know that I am in His good hands. All of the rest is purely speculation, conjecture, all of which leads to confusion, which we all know is the genesis of Babylon.


#11

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