Divine Mercy Chaplet


#1

Can someone please explain the Divine Mercy Chaplet to me,

Eternal Father, I offer you the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Our Lord, Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.

How can we offer such things to God? Isn’t it somewhat presumptuous to claim that we (mere humans) are capable of offering these divine qualities that are reserved for God alone. Isn’t it Christ that made/makes this offering? And since when do we possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, after all one can’t offer something they don’t have.


#2

I hope someone’s got a good answer.

I regularly pray the chaplet but must admit I don’t reallyunderstand that point. I just about manage with the concept of offering Jesus to God in the mass liturgy but the chaplet by being separate from the eucharist, seems to take it a step further.


#3

[quote=levi86]Can someone please explain the Divine Mercy Chaplet to me,

How can we offer such things to God? Isn’t it somewhat presumptuous to claim that we (mere humans) are capable of offering these divine qualities that are reserved for God alone. Isn’t it Christ that made/makes this offering? And since when do we possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, after all one can’t offer something they don’t have.
[/quote]

it is Christ who makes the sacrifice, we join with Christ in His one salvific act in each and every Mass, where it is the priest in persona Christi who offers the sacrifice and we who join with him in our participation. Our attitude toward all suffering in our lives should be to consciously offer them to God in union with Christ’s suffering on the Cross. A prayer such as that in the chaplet or any other occassion of meditation on the Passion such as praying the Stations of the Cross is a prayer of union with Christ where we join in His offering of Himself to the Father for our sakes, and it is an acknowledgement on our part of our gratitude for that gift.


#4

[quote=puzzleannie]it is Christ who makes the sacrifice, we join with Christ in His one salvific act in each and every Mass, where it is the priest in persona Christi who offers the sacrifice and we who join with him in our participation. Our attitude toward all suffering in our lives should be to consciously offer them to God in union with Christ’s suffering on the Cross. A prayer such as that in the chaplet or any other occassion of meditation on the Passion such as praying the Stations of the Cross is a prayer of union with Christ where we join in His offering of Himself to the Father for our sakes, and it is an acknowledgement on our part of our gratitude for that gift.
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Is that biblical?


#5

Blessed Faustina Kowalska recieved a message from the Lord. A message of mercy that she was told to spread throughout the world.She was asked to become an apostle of God’s mercy and thus her entire life was to be a sacrifice–a life lived for others. At Gods request she willingly offered her personal sufferings in union with Him to atone for the sins of the world. By writing about God’s mercy in her daily life she was to encourage others to trust in Him and thus prepare the world for His coming. She kept a diary for 4 years. She recieved Divine revelations and mystical experiences which resulted in a book of about 600 pages. It reveals the love of God for His people emphasizing the need to trust in Him in His infinite mercy. During that time is when He appeared to her in a vision. She saw Jesus clothed in a white garment with His right hand raised in blessing. His left hand was touching His garment by His heart from where there were two rays; one red and one white. Jesus said to her "Paint an image according to the pattern you see with the signature: Jesus I trust in You…I promise that the soul that will venerate this image will not perish. I also promise victory over enemies already here on earth, especially at the hour of death. " He also revealed to Blessed Faustina the prayers of the Divine Mercy chaplet which was inspired by the Holy Trinity. Jesus promised extradordinary things to anyone who recites the chaplet, not only for ouselves but for the world. You’ve got to read her book, it’s so inspirational, you’ll never question the chaplet again. You’ll become an apostle of Mercy as she did and begin to spread devotion to it.

Blessings.


#6

To answer the original question, in simple terms if you change the wording a bit this is what it means when prayed by us:

Eternal Father, I remind you of the sacrifice of the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Our Lord, Jesus Christ, so that you might humbly consider the atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.

Make sense? They discussed this on CA Live a couple of weeks ago.


#7

[quote=levi86]Can someone please explain the Divine Mercy Chaplet to me,

How can we offer such things to God? Isn’t it somewhat presumptuous to claim that we (mere humans) are capable of offering these divine qualities that are reserved for God alone. Isn’t it Christ that made/makes this offering? And since when do we possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, after all one can’t offer something they don’t have.
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I highlighted part of the original post.

How can we really offer anything to God if we can’t offer Him that which He first gives us? All we have comes from Him. In every aspect of our giving, we offer only that which He has first given us. If I sing His praises, I use the voice He gave me. If I donate all my money to the poor, I am donating the gifts He gave me. If I dedicate my whole life to Him and in the end suffer martrydom, I am only giving back to Him the life He first gave to me.

Yet none of those things is really good enough for God. Ultimately, the only truly acceptable and perfect gift I can offer Him that He gave me is Jesus. I unite all the other things I give Him with the perfect gift of Jesus. Rather than it being presumptious to offer to God the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus as we do in the Divine Mercy Chaplet, I think it’s presumptious to think we have anything else to give that is truly worthy of God.


#8

[quote=levi86]Can someone please explain the Divine Mercy Chaplet to me,

How can we offer such things to God? Isn’t it somewhat presumptuous to claim that we (mere humans) are capable of offering these divine qualities that are reserved for God alone. Isn’t it Christ that made/makes this offering? And since when do we possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, after all one can’t offer something they don’t have.
[/quote]

Hi Levi!
One of my very favorite prayers!

This really should be an easy one for anyone coming from a Protestant background IMO.

I compare it to “the sinner’s prayer” because that is really what it is. It is believers interceeding for ourselves and the sins of the whole world offering as our only merit and defense the sacrifice of Our Lord on the cross. It is a beautiful meditation and contemplation of the terrible price that Jesus paid for our sins. I often pray mine while gazing at a crucifix. I find it helps me to abhor any inclinations to sin all the more, and that is always a good thing.

Isn’t this what saving faith in Christ is? Recognzing that terrible price He paid and offering it to God the Father in exchange for our soul?

Matthew 16:26 For what doth it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his own soul? Or what exchange shall a man give for his soul?

Mark 8:36 For what shall it profit a man, if he gain the whole world, and suffer the loss of his soul? 37 Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?

I do hope that helps you my friend. I have had some amazing answers to this prayer, especially as a novena.
Pax tecum,


#9

[quote=gardenswithkids]Rather than it being presumptious to offer to God the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus as we do in the Divine Mercy Chaplet, I think it’s presumptious to think we have anything else to give that is truly worthy of God.
[/quote]

Just so. There is an old Protestant hymn that says:

“Just as I am without one plea,
But that Thy Blood was shed for me…”

That’s how I think of it: a plea to God, offering Him the One Thing that is sufficient. The Divine Mercy Chaplet is my favorite prayer.


#10

[quote=levi86]Is that biblical?
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1 corinthians 10 :15-16
The blesing cup that we bless is a communion with the blood of Christ, and the bread that we bread is a communion with the Body of Christ.
1 cor 11: 26-27
Until the Lord comes therefore every time you eat this bread and drink this cup you are proclaiming his death and so anyone who eats the bread or drinks the cup unworthily will be behaving unworthily toward the Body and Blood of Christ

Luke 22: 19-20
and having taken bread he gave thanks and broke and gave it to them saying, This is my body, which is being given for you: do this in remembrance of me. In like manner he took also the cup after the supper saying, This cup is the new covenant in my blood, which shall be shed for you.


#11

[quote=JKirkLVNV]The Divine Mercy Chaplet is my favorite prayer.
[/quote]

It’s one of my favorites too.:gopray2:


#12

[quote=levi86]Can someone please explain the Divine Mercy Chaplet to me,

How can we offer such things to God? Isn’t it somewhat presumptuous to claim that we (mere humans) are capable of offering these divine qualities that are reserved for God alone. Isn’t it Christ that made/makes this offering? And since when do we possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, after all one can’t offer something they don’t have.
[/quote]

No we ( mere humans) do not possess these qualities/aspects of divinity, however through love, He gave us this chaplet, because of His infinite mercy for us. He allows us to unite with Him by way of the chaplet, and by doing so, we invoke it’s omnipotence not only for ourselves but for the whole world. He will pour his Mercy upon us ALL.


#13

One of the reasons Blessed Faustina devoted her life to the apostolate of mercy for the world is because Jesus allowed her to see a vision of hell. She saw the pain and sufferring especially of non-believers and lukewarm souls that did not believe in the existence of hell. This especially inspired her to constantly pray in union with Jesus, the most powerful form of prayer known to the world through the prayer that He inspired her of…The Chaplet of the Divine Mercy. Read about her vision of hell.
www.divinemercysunday.com/vision.htm
Blessings


#14

Thanks everyone for all your responses, it’s been incredibly helpful.

Apart from the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, does anyone know of any other prayers that can be said on a standard rosary?


#15

We always unite ourselves with Christs suffering:

Col 1:24: Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the church,

Peace and God Bless
Nicene


#16

Yes, there is the rosary for the unborn. The prayers are specifically for the purpose of saving the unborn babies. www.rosaryoftheunborn.com The rosary beads are shaped like tears and inside each one there is a tiny unborn child.

Blessings :gopray2:


#17

Here is another one. You can pray for the world. This one was designed by Archbishop Fulton J Sheen. The colors represent the continents of the world…green is for Africa, blue…Island of the Pacific… white is for Europe…red is for America…and yellow is for Asia. www.dio.org/missions/rosarylflt2003.pdf
www.worldmissions-catholicchurch.org

Blessings


#18

The peace rosary is another good one. www.gnm.org/prayers/peacerosary/


#19

[quote=asteroid]I hope someone’s got a good answer.

I regularly pray the chaplet but must admit I don’t really understand that point. I just about manage with the concept of offering Jesus to God in the mass liturgy but the chaplet by being separate from the eucharist, seems to take it a step further.
[/quote]

Is the Chaplet really separate from the Eucharist? The Eucharist IS the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, and that is exactly what is being offered up in the Chaplet of Divine Mercy!

The Chaplet of Divine Mercy is an incredible prayer; it is a priestly prayer of the highest order. The prayer offers to God the Father not only the most perfect offering that a priest can offer, but the intentions of the prayer are also of the highest order. This priestly prayer is not just making an offering of atonement for one’s own sins, but for the sins OF THE WHOLE WORLD. Could any priestly prayer ever exceed this prayer? I don’t see how, because it offers the most perfect offering, for the greatest of all intentions.

Personally, I don’t think that the Chaplet of Divine Mercy is prayer that is offered separate from the Eucharist, but it is a prayer that is joined, in some mysterious manner, to the Eucharist that is being offered from all the altars throughout the world – a prayer not unlike the Morning Offering Prayer of the Blue Army of Fatima:O my God in union with the Immaculate Heart of Mary, I offer thee the Precious Blood of Jesus from all the altars throughout the world, joining with it the offering of my every thought, word and action of this day. …

**Catechism of the Catholic Church

1545** The redemptive sacrifice of Christ is unique, accomplished once for all; yet it is made present in the Eucharistic sacrifice of the Church. …I believe the priestly aspect of the Chaplet of Divine Mercy is not yet fully appreciated. Jesus gave this prayer to a woman, a member of the common priesthood of all the faithful. To me, this is a revelation from Christ of the power inherent in the common priesthood of all the faithful.

We have women priests in the Catholic Church. Women priests that have been consecrated into the one priesthood of Christ through the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation. The priestly prayers that they can offer are of the highest order!**Catechism of the Catholic Church

1546** Christ, high priest and unique mediator, has made of the Church “a kingdom, priests for his God and Father.” The whole community of believers is, as such, priestly. The faithful exercise their baptismal priesthood through their participation, each according to his own vocation, in Christ’s mission as priest, prophet, and king. Through the sacraments of Baptism and Confirmation the faithful are “consecrated to be . . . a holy priesthood.”

1544 … Christ Jesus, the “one mediator between God and men” … “by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are sanctified,” that is, by the unique sacrifice of the cross.


#20

In His great love for us, the Lord Jesus gave us a great miracle of mercy; the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. The miracle is that Jesus remains with us under the form of bread and wine, not only for our spiritual nourishment, but to be kept company by us as well. In the Eucharist Jesus is fully present as He is in heaven. In the image of the Divine Mercy the red and pale rays, represent the Eucharistic Lord Jesus.His heart has been pierced and now pours forth blood and water as a fountain of mercy for the whole world. It is sacrificial. This sacrifice is present in Mass everyday…The church teaches us that the Eucharist is a fountain of grace and mercy. In her revelations, Blessed Faustina was given the chaplet to obtain mercy for the whole world as an act of solidarity with the suffering Son united with Him through the Eucharist.The most powerful form of prayer. Pray the Divine Mercy daily and spread devotion to it.


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