Do any protestant churches have worldwide leadership?


#1

In the (Roman) Catholic Church, the Pope is the boss. It doesn't matter what country you live in. If you are Catholic, you are part of one Communion which transcends national borders, and it has always been so, ever since the first Bishop ventured outside of the Roman Empire.

Are there any present-day protestant churches like this? (I'm asking about established ecclesiastic communions, not mission churches. And I'm not asking about other Catholic Communions such as the Greek Orthodox. I'm asking about Christian protestants).

The authority of protestant church leaders seems to always end at the border. Sometimes like-minded protestant leaders might meet in an international synod, but I have never heard of any such synod that had any real authority to impose its resolutions upon their faithful - these synods are are advisory only. They are not like Ecumenical Councils, which are binding upon all Catholics worlldwide.

Are there any truly worldwide protestant churches?


#2

No, afraid not. The Southern Baptists have Conventions, but they are not worldwide. Only the Catholic Church has a worldwide Papa! The denominations are fragmented.

:)


#3

I think the Jehova's Witnesses do. That might be stretching your definition of Protestant however.


#4

I think the Anglican tradition would point to the archbishop of Canterbury as their head.
In Lutheranism, it is split up between different synods but they do go world wide. Methodist have more of a loose conference of their bishops as well. As someone pointed out, Southern Baptists are lead by their conference. As you look at the different denominations, leadership does splinter down as they have splintered between themselves.


#5

I don’t think so!!! Not even the “real” Anglican Church (the Church of England) recognizes any real authority vested in the Archbishop of Canterbury beyond his own diocese. He has no authority over the Bishops of any other CoE diocese. He cannot impose his will or decisions upon anyone outside of East Kent. He is not the head of the Church of England (the head of the CoE, by English law, is the reigning monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth-2).

He is the symbolic head of the Anglican Communion, but has no real authority beyond his own diocese. He is not even remotely comparable to a Pope.

When I refer to “leadership” I mean real leadership - what the leader says, goes (and for everybody).

As someone pointed out, Southern Baptists are lead by their conference

I beg to differ. Baptists are congregationalists. Each congregation is absolutely autonomous. The Baptist conference is advisory only - it has no authority whatsoever to establish doctrine or rules for Baptist parishes or ministers. It is the denomination that is LEAST likely to have worldwide leadership.


#6

[quote="Corki, post:3, topic:299116"]
I think the Jehova's Witnesses do. That might be stretching your definition of Protestant however.

[/quote]

Considering that they are not rightly considered Christian, I would say that they would not count as Protestant, maybe considered apostate like the Mormon church. The Mormon church also has their "prophet" as their head (I believe worldwide), but since they are not considered Protestant Christians, they would not count toward the question of the OP.


#7

[quote="DavidFilmer, post:5, topic:299116"]
I don't think so!!! Not even the "real" Anglican Church (the Church of England) recognizes any real authority vested in the Archbishop of Canterbury beyond his own diocese. He has no authority over the Bishops of any other CoE diocese. He cannot impose his will or decisions upon anyone outside of East Kent. He is not the head of the Church of England (the head of the CoE, by English law, is the reigning monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth-2).

He is the symbolic head of the Anglican Communion, but has no real authority beyond his own diocese. He is not even remotely comparable to a Pope.

When I refer to "leadership" I mean real leadership - what the leader says, goes (and for everybody).

I beg to differ. Baptists are congregationalists. Each congregation is absolutely autonomous. The Baptist conference is advisory only - it has no authority whatsoever to establish doctrine or rules for Baptist parishes or ministers. It is the denomination that is LEAST likely to have worldwide leadership.

[/quote]

While the archbishop may be more of a figure head in the Anglican communion, he is seen and used as that. Southern Baptist conference is just that but they do try to decide on things together. I am not sure what your background but I was a former Methodists and I was using these examples as types or what is most similar and I don't appreciate you jumping down my throat.


#8

SSPX
Not in the Catholic Church (though this may change soon)
Formed in Protest to RC teaching
International organization with top down hierarchical structure.

I'm interested though, what's the reason for your question?


#9

The United Methodist Church is a worldwide denomination, and its General Conference would be a worldwide authority I think.

Though I am not very familiar with its government, the Church of God (Cleveland, Tennessee) has 6 million members, most of which are outside of the United States. It is very centralized for a Pentecostal denomination led by an International Executive Committee of the general overseer, assistant overseers, and the secretary general.

I think the very national or regional character of most Protestant denominations stems from the Protestant Reformation and the principle of the religion of the king is the religion of the realm. This principle, I think, has kind of stuck and explains why Protestants think in terms of regional church bodies.

Also, many Protestant churches intentionally embrace the principle of indigenous movements. For example, the Assemblies of God early on decided that as soon as a missionary church was able to govern itself, it would be given independence. So, in contrast to the Church of God, you have today over 140 autonomous national and regional Assemblies of God general councils around the world (in some cases like Canada there are multiple Assemblies of God groups and all are in fellowship with the Worldwide Assemblies of God).


#10

How about Seventh-Day Adventists?


#11

Mormons? That is if we were to recognize them as Protestant.

God bless


#12

Calvary Chapel :shrug: Pope Chuck Smith will remove his lampstand if they teach outside what he considers Orthodoxy. I don’t know how that works though, being that they consider themselves a non-denominational community :shrug:


#13

[quote="DavidFilmer, post:5, topic:299116"]
I don't think so!!! Not even the "real" Anglican Church (the Church of England) recognizes any real authority vested in the Archbishop of Canterbury beyond his own diocese. He has no authority over the Bishops of any other CoE diocese. He cannot impose his will or decisions upon anyone outside of East Kent. He is not the head of the Church of England (the head of the CoE, by English law, is the reigning monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth-2).

He is the symbolic head of the Anglican Communion, but has no real authority beyond his own diocese. He is not even remotely comparable to a Pope.

[/quote]

You are not quite right. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the symbolic head of the Anglican Communion (but recognised as the first among equals with other Archbishops in the Anglican Communion) but as the Primate has legal authority over the Church of England, and all the other English Bishops (30 in England, and in Europe (but not Wales, Scotland or Ireland which have their own Archbishops) recognise his authority. Incidently, the Queen is NOT the Head of the Church of England but Supreme Governor.


#14

[quote="robwar, post:7, topic:299116"]
I am not sure what your background

[/quote]

I am a former Anglican, and my wife is a former Baptist.

I don't appreciate you jumping down my throat.

Huh? I was just responding - I see nothing rude in my response. If you are offended by THAT, I suggest you are in the wrong forum. There are people here who really WILL jump down your throat, and you seem to be ill prepared for such an event.


#15

Well, Billy Graham has been nicknamed “The Protestant Pope”.


#16

I think Graham is a fine Christian man, but nothing near a pope. the differences in doctrine between Mr. graham and Lutheranism is significant.

Jon


#17

[quote="robwar, post:4, topic:299116"]
I think the Anglican tradition would point to the archbishop of Canterbury as their head.
In Lutheranism, it is split up between different synods but they do go world wide. Methodist have more of a loose conference of their bishops as well. As someone pointed out, Southern Baptists are lead by their conference. As you look at the different denominations, leadership does splinter down as they have splintered between themselves.

[/quote]

The polity of Lutheranism has always been in this way, more of national or cultural synods.
Even the early synods in the US are offsprings of various immigrant groups.
there are, however, two world wide bodies, the largest being the Lutheran Wolrd Federation, of which the ELCA is a member, and the International Lutheran Council, of which the LCMS is a member.

Both of these are more of a federation than an ecclesiastical body.

Jon


#18

=DavidFilmer;9794392]In the (Roman) Catholic Church, the Pope is the boss. It doesn't matter what country you live in. If you are Catholic, you are part of one Communion which transcends national borders, and it has always been so, ever since the first Bishop ventured outside of the Roman Empire.

Are there any present-day protestant churches like this? (I'm asking about established ecclesiastic communions, not mission churches. And I'm not asking about other Catholic Communions such as the Greek Orthodox. I'm asking about Christian protestants).

The authority of protestant church leaders seems to always end at the border. Sometimes like-minded protestant leaders might meet in an international synod, but I have never heard of any such synod that had any real authority to impose its resolutions upon their faithful - these synods are are advisory only. They are not like Ecumenical Councils, which are binding upon all Catholics worlldwide.

Are there any truly worldwide protestant churches?

Perhaps not:rolleyes:

Here's WHY

Matt. 10:1-8

Matt. 16:18-19

Matt. 28: 16-20

And John 20:19-23:thumbsup:

EACH of these is Christ speaking in the First person to His APOSTLES ALONE and exclusively.

Matt. 28: 16-20 explains WHY and HOW it had to extend to Tday's Pope, Bishops and Priest. "To the WHOLE WORLD" what I God persoally shared with "you"

God Bless,
pat/PJM


#19

Worldwise leaders yes and no. Do they have the equivalent of presidents of a country in some respects yes.

The following do have some type of world wide recognition.

[LIST]
*]Pentecostal-Pentecostal Assemblies (Gospel of God as well I believe)
*]Anglician-head quarters in England
*]Lutherans
*]Presbyterians - I believe England or Scotland don't quote me here
*]The United church is sort of world wide
*]Maybe the Brotherands
*]Baptists might- they are all separate but considering they all share the same classification there could be something but on an extremely small scale.
*]Jevohah Witnesses and Mormans are not Christian, they are considered more a cult verses a religion. Therefore although they are world wide, they shouldn't belong to this discussion.

[/LIST]

Hope this helps,

SG


#20

[quote="SecretGarden, post:19, topic:299116"]
Worldwise leaders yes and no. Do they have the equivalent of presidents of a country in some respects yes.

The following do have some type of world wide recognition.

[LIST]
*]Pentecostal-Pentecostal Assemblies (Gospel of God as well I believe)
*]Anglician-head quarters in England
*]Lutherans
*]Presbyterians - I believe England or Scotland don't quote me here
*]The United church is sort of world wide
*]Maybe the Brotherands
*]Baptists might- they are all separate but considering they all share the same classification there could be something but on an extremely small scale.
*]Jevohah Witnesses and Mormans are not Christian, they are considered more a cult verses a religion. Therefore although they are world wide, they shouldn't belong to this discussion.

[/LIST]

Hope this helps,

SG

[/quote]

How about those seventh-day churches?


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