Do highly competitive sports promote a competitive society?


#41

Positive: Healthy competition is good, it can give a sense of being part of a team, something bigger than yourself. It also drives people to do better and work harder.

Negative: Too much of anything is bad. It can lead to stressing too much about performance and ignoring health issues for the sake of competition.

I had one experience of the bad competitiveness when I was a first aid volunteer at a kids rugby tournament. The kids were about 11-13 and we were seeing a lot of injuries.(Adult players experience less injuries oddly enough). From bleeding noses to one dislocated lower leg (not pretty). But one fella had a concussion and a bad cut on his forehead and the Dad was in our faces trying to get us to clear him to go back out and play. We basically told him that we reccomend taking him to the hospital immediately for a skull x-ray. But the kid wanted to go back out so off he went.

THAT is an example of competition going too far.


#42

I think you were shown that they both can produce an adrenaline rush with the thrill of victory. With golf there are just big pauses between the thrills. Football offers a more frequent thrill for spectators.

I don’t think you’ve yet clarified if you are focused on violence or competition, it matters.


#43

I’m focusing on the effects of highly competitive sports on our society and I predict that it increases aggression (which violence is just a part of) and negative emotions (especially when the sports cause the feelings of aggressiveness and arrogant pride). I’m also suggesting that our being a competitive society increases stress, depression, anxiety, and aggression (including violent aggression). But I’m also predicting that it keeps our nation as a major contributor to innovation and helps keep our nation as a major world power.


#44

I believe highly competitve sports contribute to a false sense of pride and an artificial and potentially unhealthy emotional high and that this is what drives spectators to get so involved in these sports.


#45

Even if you’re right, it’s their right to be stupid.


#46

Your comments indicate an axe to grind. What’s the difference between arrogant pride your kid’s team won, and benign pride?

I would think few disagree that in the heat of the moment, it can enable violence. Just look at the conflicts following European soccer games.

I see sports more as a channeled outlet, that doesn’t result in more overall violence. American football has been hugely popular over the years, yet fans almost never resort to violence following the matches.


#47

Do you not know that in a race all the runners compete, but only one receives the prize? So run that you may obtain it. - St. Paul


#48

It’s an example of snowflake mentality. When I was a kid we wore our bloody noses, stitched chins, black eyes and scraped knees like badges of honor. We didn’t go crying to mommy and daddy to protect us. And we got over it and grew stronger.


#49

Yes, things could be just the opposite of what I’m predicting in that sports act as a source of relief of stress and an outlet of negitive energy for the public as a whole from our living in a competitive society.


#50

Are you for real?
The kid had a concussion. His pupils weren’t dilating properly. if we had your attitude there’d be lots more unnessecary deaths on the sports field.


#51

I’m speaking in general. If there’s a concussion then obviously the kid needs attention but my experience with parents these days is that they freak out if their child gets a cut or bruise. Sports are meant to be competitive, aggressive and even a bit risky. It’s the nature of the beast.


#52

Yeah but this was the opposite scenario. The child had a concussion and the father wanted him to go back out on the field.


#53

If true then I don’t think the father was being wise.


#54

I think many people don’t really understand the risks of a concussion.


#55

Parents can be very pressing outside the field. Sometimes it is almost as if something inside of them was at play more than the kid playing…


#56

A relative had this quote on the wall, it stuck with me

“How children dance to the unlived lives of their parents.”


#57

You know…that is it…So clear.


#58

This version is good too, but less poetic

quote from Jung: “The greatest burden a child must bear is the unlived life of the parents.”


#59

Despite of all we love them…
Both very good quotes.


#60

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