Do I need to go to confession?


#1

This past week I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety. I’m on 2 anxiety medications and one antidepressant. I have been on these meds less than a week so I’m not used to them or their side effects.
Today I got up, got ready for Mass, and took my meds. By the time I got to Mass my meds kicked in and my head kept bobbing up and down because they make me super drowsy. My husband kept asking me if I was ok, and people around me kept giving me odd looks. I decided to leave during the homily. I just couldn’t keep my head up any longer, I couldn’t pay attention, and I felt nauseous. Was I wrong should I have stayed? I don’t have a problem with scrupulosity, I just feel really guilty about leaving.


#2

If you didn’t feel well you didn’t commit a sin. Those circumstances are outside your control.

God Bless


#3

No, no need for confession for that. Please do not add unnecessary burden on top of your depression. God bless you!


#4

If you felt nauseous, you were right to leave, and no sin is incurred if we leave when we’re sick!

Hope you’re feeling better, now!


#5

I agree with other posters that you do not need to confess your inability to continue attending mass in this instance. However, a bit of advice.
If you aren’t doing it already, you should consider going to Confession on a weekly basis, especially with a regular confessor. I would also suggest that you log into one of the many “examination of conscience” sites oon the internet beforehand, and write down all of your sins and bring it with you into the confessional.
I’m sure the combination of the two will help you enormously in terms of relieving your feelings of angst.


#6

Remember mortal sin requires three things:
Grave matter
Full knowledge
Full consent of the will

Leaving Mass early due to not feeling well, in your case because you are getting used to new medications, is not grave matter. We are permitted to leave Mass or even miss Mass altogether, without sin, if we have a serious reason (meaning not trivial, and not feeling well is a legitimate excuse).
Additionally, consent was lacking in this case, because you were experiencing symptoms that necessitated you to leave and rest.

I hope you have peace about this, and that you feel better soon.


#7

You committed no sin. There is no Church document that states we must attend Mass from beginning to end to fulfill the Sunday obligation. You attended Mass. You fulfilled the obligation.


#8

I have an app on my phone that helps me examine my conscience. It would be hard for me to have a regular confessor, considering my parish has 4 priests and they rotate. I don’t have a problem with confession, I have just never encountered this particular situation.


#9

Thank you for the responses. They have helped me calm down. :slight_smile:


#10

You did not sin, but I would offer this piece of advice if you don’t mind. I too have tried adjusting to new medications and if they make me drowsy I tend to take them a little before bed instead of morning hours if at all possible. Of course it isn’t always a possibility so disregard this if it doesn’t apply to you. Hope you recover quickly! Pray to St. Dymphna and St. Jude. They are great helpers. You might even add in prayers to Blessed Mother Teresa, she suffered with depression for many long years. Good job in reaching out for help. All too often people choose not. Hang in there!


#11

If you have scruples, it’s very important to have a spiritual director.

Also, being sick—or feeling sick—is a legitimate excuse to leave Mass early. God and the people there would probably appreciate you not vomiting. I’ve been at a service where that happened with one of the kids :(:frowning: and it’s not fun.

I really don’t think you need to go to confession.


#12

You were sick, our Lord understands. Hopefully your meds will improve but if not there are sometimes some meds that do well for one person but not another. If they don’t help soon (without side effects) you should let your doctor know.

mlz


#13

remember the requirements of a mortal sin.
1 It has to be grave matter… You felt sick and were physically unable to complete mass
2 you have to know the sin is serious … If you’re unsure if what you did was wrong, then this doesn’t apply either
3 you have to fully consent to the sin… You didn’t. Even if it was a sin, other factors were involved. You were sick and you tried to stay but you


#14

remember the requirements of a mortal sin.
1 It has to be grave matter… You felt sick and were physically unable to complete mass
2 you have to know the sin is serious … If you’re unsure if what you did was wrong, then this doesn’t apply either
3 you have to fully consent to the sin… You didn’t. Even if it was a sin, other factors were involved. You were sick and you tried to stay but you physically couldn’t. Even your family forced you to leave. There is no mortal sin here and there doesn’t appear to be sin here from what I can tell. Of course, in the end this is between you and God, but I’m pretty sure your in the clear.


#15

I’m supposed to take them twice a day. I go back next week and I will be telling the doctor how they effect me.


#16

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