Do Jews and Muslims take blood?


#1

I have an interesting question to ask people of both beliefs.Jw’s claim that blood transfusions should not be taken, and that the Hebrews back in the OT and the NT would not have taken a blood transfusion. Is that true? Do Muslims when their life is in danger, and need a blood transfusion, do you take one? Why am I asking this? Because of the Watchtower organizations stance on the issue. Are Jews and Muslims forbidden to take blood? If not, can you point out please where it states so? If so, same thing. Thanks.

The Watchtower organization states that Hebrews were forbidden to eat/drink blood, and the same thing in the NT. They claim that God would not have allowed and does not allow anyone to take blood. What is the stance on this from both view points? What do Jews believe about this issue from the Torah and in modern times? Same question posed to Muslims. Of course, no one would deliberately drink blood, that is disgusting, but what about taking a blood transfusion? Is it forbidden for Jews and Muslims to take one if your life is in danger?

MP


#2

My father who is a Muslim needed a blood transfusion years ago…it was not an issue…he took it to save his life


#3

Ahh…so it is not forbidden in the Qur’an? Can you point it out in the Qur’an? If you have a copy? ( is it spelt Qu’ran or Q’uran? )


#4

Who knows if it is forbidden or not in the Quran…I am not a muslim so I dont know if it is or not…I am just giving you my personal experience :wink:


#5

thanks! your post is appreciated :slight_smile:


#6

*However, as Sheikh Ibrahim Desai states, the permissibility of blood donation or blood transfusion is determined by the following conditions:

a) The donor should donate his blood willingly. If he is compelled to do so, then it is not permissible;

b) There is no danger to his (the donor’s) life or health;

c) It must be clarified by the doctor that blood transfusion is necessary otherwise the life of the patient will be at stake; i.e. the recovery can not be possible without blood transfusion.

d) It is not permissible to sell one’s blood or to pay the blood donor. However, if one is desperate for blood (to save his life) and the only means to obtain it is to purchase it, then it is permissible to pay for the blood. [In this case, it is only the one who asks for the money that will incur the sin]. *
islamonline.net/servlet/Satellite?pagename=IslamOnline-English-Ask_Scholar/FatwaE/FatwaE&cid=1119503544350


#7

themodernreligion.com/misc/hh/blood-donation.html

here is another link with the Muslim point of view on this topic…hope it helps:)


#8

Jews don’t have a problem with blood transfusions. Moreover, although some Jews may mistakenly think otherwise, we don’t have a problem with donating organs.


#9

It was once the case that a Pope [whose name I no longer recall], forbade Catholics to take blood transfusions. It was degreed because in the middle ages, experiments were conducted where attempts were made to give soldiers badly wounded in battle, the blood by transfusion from slaughtered animals.

Leviticus 17:10-14 speaks about taking blood. Not without good cause study of Levitical law and (I could be wrong) but most of the restrictions given if you look at them were a matter of health–they had no refrigeration–no presevatives (except salt) we now know that many dieseases live in the blood. Also if you look at the animals that they are told not to eat (cloven hoofs, forked tongue–the animals restricted ate dead animals or wallered in their filth, or carried such things as salmonella).

In modern times it is regarded as a pious thing to do to be a blood donor. But the Jehovah Witnesses ‘work to the letter or the Levitical law’. They do say that 'it is up to the infividual believer if they wish to do it [a change from the old policy] but there is still strong resistance among their followers.

According to JW beliefs the second coming occured in 1914 an event witnessed only by a few JW’s. Therefore, any brother or sister who err, should be reported to the JW secret police who sill deal with it.


#10

I think blood transfusions and organ-doning are somewhat reminiscent of the literal body and blood that Christ gives us in the Eucharist.


#11

Maybe. But if I need a new kidney, I’m going with the the blood and organ, not the wine and wafer :slight_smile:


#12

I’m going to have to second that one Vlake2.

Jesus would agree that if you needed blood or an organ to save your life than by all means get it!:slight_smile:


#13

Valke can correct me if I am wrong.

I believe that Orthodox Jewish people can’t ingest blood, so no rare steaks. But blood transfusions or organ donations are not included in that rule. It might be different if they had to actually drink the blood transfusion(yuck).

If the JWs are included in the rules that apply to Orthodox Jews then they will have to start keeping kosher. Something that I doubt that they do.


#14

But I never said for someone to deny a blood transfusion or kidney transplant in favor of the Eucharist. I’ve only said that I think blood transfusions and organ-doning are somewhat reminiscent of the literal body and blood that Christ gives us in the Eucharist.

Consequently, I don’t think that healing from the Eucharist in the form of either replenishment of lost blood or even a replacement organ would be beyond the scope of the documented miracles which have already been observed concerning the Eucharist.

Seems reasonable to me anyway.


#15

Do we need to have another thread on humor?


#16

:confused: :confused: what in his/her post was humorous(sp?)??


#17

Apparently not.


#18

sorry Valke2…you obviously saw something of humor guess i just missed it…or where you being sarcastic?


#19

I think we’re talking about different posts.


#20

oh Valke2 anything is possible;)
it is getting near my bed time and I tomorrow I will reread the thread from post #1 and figure it out then…


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