Do you celebrate Passover?

I got to thinking today, while reading the Catechism, why don’t we celebrate Passover? I understand that it is considered a “Jewish holiday” in our times, but didn’t Christians long ago celebrate this feast?

Will you be celebrating Passover on April 19th? Or do you consider the Last Supper on the 21st to be a “Christian Passover”?

I’m just curious! :smiley:

The Passover is about the blood of the lamb so that the angel of death will pass over the houses of the Jews.

Why the need to celebrate that when we have the Blood of the Lamb of God who conquered death by death? Christ's sacrifice makes everything preceeding Him pale in comparisson. While its nice to look at that from a historical aspect, we should concentrate on the perfect sacrifice of the unblemished Lamb.

In a sense, we celebrate Passover every time we attend mass… One of the old liturgies had the words “Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us; Therefore let us keep the feast”

But, no we do not celebrate the Jewish Passover.

No, we don't celebrate the Passover.

[quote="PolishK, post:1, topic:227000"]
I got to thinking today, while reading the Catechism, why don't we celebrate Passover? I understand that it is considered a "Jewish holiday" in our times, but didn't Christians long ago celebrate this feast?

Will you be celebrating Passover on April 19th? Or do you consider the Last Supper on the 21st to be a "Christian Passover"?

I'm just curious! :D

[/quote]

You still do, it's called Easter in this country. Much of the rest of the Christian world still refers to the Feast of the Resurrection as "Passover." :thumbsup:

[quote="PolishK, post:1, topic:227000"]
I got to thinking today, while reading the Catechism, why don't we celebrate Passover? I understand that it is considered a "Jewish holiday" in our times, but didn't Christians long ago celebrate this feast?

Will you be celebrating Passover on April 19th? Or do you consider the Last Supper on the 21st to be a "Christian Passover"?

I'm just curious! :D

[/quote]

The passover prefigured Calvary. Jesus is the Lamb of GOD. He shed his Blood on the Cross. We eat the Flesh and Drink the Blood in Holy communion. Holy Mass replaces The Passover. So when you go to mass , for all intents and purposes you are celebrating Passover in a more perfect manner.

Okay, nice to see your responses. I've just heard of some Catholics celebrating it, others who consider the feast of the Last Supper (Thurs. before Easter) a "passover", etc.

I am a BIG history nut and think that it's a rather intriguing celebration. Though, we clearly have a new covenant with God through Christ.

My husband and I have Jewish friends and, as a Catholic, I do not see anything wrong with attending their feasts when invited. Is this correct?

Thanks!

[quote="PolishK, post:7, topic:227000"]
Okay, nice to see your responses. I've just heard of some Catholics celebrating it, others who consider the feast of the Last Supper (Thurs. before Easter) a "passover", etc.

I am a BIG history nut and think that it's a rather intriguing celebration. Though, we clearly have a new covenant with God through Christ.

My husband and I have Jewish friends and, as a Catholic, I do not see anything wrong with attending their feasts when invited. Is this correct?

Thanks!

[/quote]

I don't think its wrong to share with the Jews as long as you don't lose perspective on our own beliefs. We do read about the Passover during Holy Week in the sense of appreciating Christ's sacrifice. The Passover was a precedent of what would happen with Christ.

[quote="PolishK, post:7, topic:227000"]
Okay, nice to see your responses. I've just heard of some Catholics celebrating it, others who consider the feast of the Last Supper (Thurs. before Easter) a "passover", etc.

I am a BIG history nut and think that it's a rather intriguing celebration. Though, we clearly have a new covenant with God through Christ.

My husband and I have Jewish friends and, as a Catholic, I do not see anything wrong with attending their feasts when invited. Is this correct?

Thanks!

[/quote]

Go for it! I've never been to one; I love lamb. I understand there's not allowed to be leftovers. Enjoy!

You could invite them for Easter dinner. Just don't have ham!;)

The Ethiopian tradition has the celebration of a Passover meal on Holy Thursday each year.

RC parishes up here in Canada do offer communal Passover meals in the church halls and the Hebrew Catholics (there are such) celebrate the Passover as well.

No reason not to. I feel like a "completed Catholic."

Ba-shana ha-ba bi-Yerushalayim! (Next year in Jerusalem!)

Alex

[quote="josephdaniel29, post:5, topic:227000"]
You still do, it's called Easter in this country. Much of the rest of the Christian world still refers to the Feast of the Resurrection as "Passover." :thumbsup:

[/quote]

Exactly. The word for Easter, for example, in Spanish, Italian and French is the same as the word for Passover. (Just like the words for sabbath and Saturday are also the same.) And when one attends the Easter Vigil, one is reminded that "This is the passover feast," the night when Christ passed over from death unto life. The intricate connections of the old and new testaments remind one on this night that Easter is the completion of passover.

Each and every time the bread and wine becomes the body and blood of Christ not only is the passover observed but the sabbath also.

Since I was raised a Jew, and was among the first to convert to the Faith in my family, I do observe the Seder, (Ritual celebrated on the first two nights of Passover.) However what I do, in observing the ritual is to invite members of my new family, (other Catholics) and use the Seder to instruct them on how the Passover was the promise and hope of Christ, and how it was only fulfilled by Calvary. As part of the Seder, all Jews are instructed that we are not to consider that the Exodus is something God did to our ancesters, to someone else, but that by observing the rites of the Seder, we must consider that we really are participating in the Exodus. I explain that our Lord's institution of the Eucharist at the Seder was not random, for while we do so differently at Mass, we still stand at the foot of the cross, in an unbloody manner at each Mass, and the Real Christ is present in the Eurcharist. It is how the Mass was so easy for me to accept when I became Catholic, because God prepared us to understand and accept it through the Passover Seder.

[quote="PolishK, post:7, topic:227000"]
Okay, nice to see your responses. I've just heard of some Catholics celebrating it, others who consider the feast of the Last Supper (Thurs. before Easter) a "passover", etc.

I am a BIG history nut and think that it's a rather intriguing celebration. Though, we clearly have a new covenant with God through Christ.

My husband and I have Jewish friends and, as a Catholic, I do not see anything wrong with attending their feasts when invited. Is this correct?

Thanks!

[/quote]

I think it depends on what you hope accomplish by doing so. Do you honor and respect your friends in a Charitable manner by respecting their beliefs as the purpose for going? Do you honor GOD By worshipping him in a manner used prior to the one he perfected as well? Obviously not. So I think what your intent for going is - answers the question.

Okay, I think some posters are confused as to what I am asking.
I am fully aware that the blood and body of Christ received through the Eucharist are pretty much celebrating the "passover". (Though, I am not allowed to receive the Eucharist because my husband is not Catholic).

Thanks everyone for your insightful comments. This is just a question of curiosity. :)

[quote="PolishK, post:15, topic:227000"]
Okay, I think some posters are confused as to what I am asking.
I am fully aware that the blood and body of Christ received through the Eucharist are pretty much celebrating the "passover". (Though, I am not allowed to receive the Eucharist because my husband is not Catholic).

Thanks everyone for your insightful comments. This is just a question of curiosity. :)

[/quote]

What makes you think that some are confused? And what exactly are you asking?

Observance of the Mosaic Law is absolutely forbidden by the Church, notwithstanding modern false oecumenical practice. Please see the below decree from the Council of Florence, quoted from the EWTN website:

It firmly believes, professes and teaches that the legal prescriptions of the old Testament or the Mosaic law, which are divided into ceremonies, holy sacrifices and sacraments, because they were instituted to signify something in the future, although they were adequate for the divine cult of that age, once our lord Jesus Christ who was signified by them had come, came to an end and the sacraments of the new Testament had their beginning. Whoever, after the passion, places his hope in the legal prescriptions and submits himself to them as necessary for salvation and as if faith in Christ without them could not save, sins mortally. It does not deny that from Christ's passion until the promulgation of the gospel they could have been retained, provided they were in no way believed to be necessary for salvation. But it asserts that after the promulgation of the gospel they cannot be observed without loss of eternal salvation. Therefore it denounces all who after that time observe circumcision, the sabbath and other legal prescriptions as strangers to the faith of Christ and unable to share in eternal salvation, unless they recoil at some time from these errors. Therefore it strictly orders all who glory in the name of Christian, not to practise circumcision either before or after baptism, since whether or not they place their hope in it, it cannot possibly be observed without loss of eternal salvation.

[quote="josephdaniel29, post:5, topic:227000"]
You still do, it's called Easter in this country. Much of the rest of the Christian world still refers to the Feast of the Resurrection as "Passover." :thumbsup:

[/quote]

That is true. I believe that you will only see any mention of easter in German and english bibles.
Bibles in other languaes use passover. Or varients from the hebrew word for pass over.

Anyway. Is it ok to celebrate passover? For example, if a Jewish friend was to invite you over to celebrate passover. Is it totally ok for you to not only attend but to participate? My answer would be yes. Because We have as much to be grateful for God saving the Jews in egypt as the Jews do themselves. No Jews no Jesus.

[quote="IntegraCatholic, post:17, topic:227000"]
Observance of the Mosaic Law is absolutely forbidden by the Church, notwithstanding modern false oecumenical practice. Please see the below decree from the Council of Florence, quoted from the EWTN website:

It firmly believes, professes and teaches that the legal prescriptions of the old Testament or the Mosaic law, which are divided into ceremonies, holy sacrifices and sacraments, because they were instituted to signify something in the future, although they were adequate for the divine cult of that age, once our lord Jesus Christ who was signified by them had come, came to an end and the sacraments of the new Testament had their beginning. Whoever, after the passion, places his hope in the legal prescriptions and submits himself to them as necessary for salvation and as if faith in Christ without them could not save, sins mortally. It does not deny that from Christ's passion until the promulgation of the gospel they could have been retained, provided they were in no way believed to be necessary for salvation. But it asserts that after the promulgation of the gospel they cannot be observed without loss of eternal salvation. Therefore it denounces all who after that time observe circumcision, the sabbath and other legal prescriptions as strangers to the faith of Christ and unable to share in eternal salvation, unless they recoil at some time from these errors. Therefore it strictly orders all who glory in the name of Christian, not to practise circumcision either before or after baptism, since whether or not they place their hope in it, it cannot possibly be observed without loss of eternal salvation.

[/quote]

So i can't be grateful and offer thanks for God doing what he did? Even though i know i don't have to and i accepted Jesus as the one and only way to salvation? I am not arguing or disputing. I have been a Catholic for a long time and just when i start to think i know all there is to know i learn some more.

I'd sure offend Jewish friends before I'd offend Jesus Christ.

The way you pray is the way you believe (unless it's a "pretend" passover).

It would be like early Christians burning a little incense to Caesar cause their neighbors asked them to come to the party.

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