Do you kiss your fingers after making the Sign of the Cross?


#1

Want to make sure I'm not the only one doing this...:blush:


#2

I do, but I don't see it in too many Anglo parishes or among Anglos. I've mainly seen it among Hispanics and in Hispanic parishes.

I've seen Anglos touch the chest after making the SoC, but not many kissing after it.


#3

No.


#4

Not to be picky, since this is really sort of frivalous and off-topic, but not every non-Hispanic “White” person is Anglo. The Anglos were one of many Caucasian tribes in Europe. (The Spanish are Caucasian too, btw). As an Italian-American, I am a descendant of the Latins (Romans) and get really upset when I claim that lineage, then someone says to me, “No, you’re White, you’re not Latin, you’re Anglo!”.

Anyways, now that I got that off my chest, (sorry, I do digress!), on to the OP: I, too, mainly if not only see Hispanic Catholics do it, and I find it appealing because it seems so beautiful in its simple expression of loving the one Triune God so much that you would kiss the hand you crossed youself, you called on his name, with. I’m not sure if that is the meaning behind it, or how the ritual or tradition started, but I find myself wanting to do it, too, but get uncomfortable because, again, I only see Hispanics do it and there is still a little prejuduce around…sadly.

-Chris


#5

I have been attending Mass and have noticed that people have been doing a mini sign of the cross on their forehead and chest. Am I seeing right? If so what is it for?:)


#6

[quote="acacia12, post:5, topic:294070"]
I have been attending Mass and have noticed that people have been doing a mini sign of the cross on their forehead and chest. Am I seeing right? If so what is it for?:)

[/quote]

Could that be at the start of the Gospel reading? Before every Gospel reading, as you do know as a Catholic, we cross our minds, mouths, and hearts, symbolizing the Gospel being imprinted into our minds, onto our hearts, and to be proclaimed by our mouths. That's all I can guess.

-Chris


#7

[quote="acacia12, post:5, topic:294070"]
I have been attending Mass and have noticed that people have been doing a mini sign of the cross on their forehead and chest. Am I seeing right? If so what is it for?:)

[/quote]

You are probably seeing this at the announciation of the Gospel. The forehead, the lips and the heart are crossed. It was explained to me that this is to remind us to keep the message on our minds, our lips, and in our hearts. But it's been a while since Sunday School...


#8

I am a recent returner to Church. So wasn't to sure what it meant. I felt out of place a little bit. I'm doing the RCIA course in September. Thank you for explanations :)


#9

I have seen that! I found the ethnicity discussion interesting. The Catholic church in Hawaii has many Filopino people.

Thanks for the explanation re. marking head, mouth and heart and what it means. As an adult coming into the church, I don’t imagine I would normally be told about all this.


#10

[quote="acacia12, post:8, topic:294070"]
I am a recent returner to Church. So wasn't to sure what it meant. I felt out of place a little bit. I'm doing the RCIA course in September. Thank you for explanations :)

[/quote]

I see.

You're welcomed.

-Chris


#11

I don't kiss my fingers, but I do tap my chin when I say the "amen" at the end. I got this from my mother.


#12

[quote="White_Peony, post:1, topic:294070"]
Want to make sure I'm not the only one doing this...:blush:

[/quote]

I don't do this, but I've seen many people doing this. You're not the only one.


#13

[quote="WillYart, post:9, topic:294070"]
I have seen that! I found the ethnicity discussion interesting. The Catholic church in Hawaii has many Filopino people.

Thanks for the explanation re. marking head, mouth and heart and what it means. As an adult coming into the church, I don't imagine I would normally be told about all this.

[/quote]

I was raised Catholic between 0-13 years old. Had my Baptism and First Holy Communion. I may have been told this but can't remember. I didn't know that there's sooo.... much to learn! :bigyikes:


#14

[quote="acacia12, post:8, topic:294070"]
I am a recent returner to Church. So wasn't to sure what it meant. I felt out of place a little bit. I'm doing the RCIA course in September. Thank you for explanations :)

[/quote]

Welcome Home!


#15

Yes, this has been my practice since I was a little girl. I'm not hispanic, but my godmother was; ) my husband also does this, as does our oldest daughter.............


#16

**Been a Catholic my whole life, and just now realized exactly how I make the Sign of the Cross !

I thought I did it the same each time, but discovered that if I make a huge Sign of the Cross ( down to my stomach, like at the end of Mass ), I don't end it by touching my lips. But, if I make my usual Sign of the Cross ( to my chest ), I do automatically touch my lips at the end ( kissing the feet of Jesus on the cross ).

Obviously by my name, my roots are Italian. Hummmm, interesting find !**


#17

[quote="WillYart, post:9, topic:294070"]
I have seen that! I found the ethnicity discussion interesting. The Catholic church in Hawaii has many Filopino people.

Thanks for the explanation re. marking head, mouth and heart and what it means. As an adult coming into the church, I don't imagine I would normally be told about all this.

[/quote]

Actually, based on the RCIA program at our church this is one of the many items about Catholicism that you will be taught. Welcome home!

DGB


#18

[quote="DoGodsBidding, post:17, topic:294070"]
Actually, based on the RCIA program at our church this is one of the many items about Catholicism that you will be taught. Welcome home!

DGB

[/quote]

Oh ok. Thanks. Does RCIA always go from the end of the summer until Easter or does it vary? I was encouraged to invoke the assistance of the Rev. Fr. of my cathedral if it isn't working out but I want to be cooperative and get as much as possible out of the process.

I'm sure I'll learn more about the process tomorrow morning at the 1st meeting.


#19

Don't know where this custom came from. Sr. Mary never taught us this in 1949.


#20

[quote="cmforte, post:4, topic:294070"]
Not to be picky, since this is really sort of frivalous and off-topic, but not every non-Hispanic "White" person is Anglo. The Anglos were one of many Caucasian tribes in Europe. (The Spanish are Caucasian too, btw). As an Italian-American, I am a descendant of the Latins (Romans) and get really upset when I claim that lineage, then someone says to me, "No, you're White, you're not Latin, you're Anglo!".
...

[/quote]

Not to de-rail the thread, but I know what you mean. Being 100% of Italian descent with fair skin and blue eyes, I am often mistaken for an Anglo too. I like to tell people I am not a WASP [white, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant] because I'm not "white", not Anglo, not Saxon, and not a Protestant. I said that to a Hispanic once, and he got offended :p


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