Do you know people who are former catholics?


#101

I also have an aunt who was real church lady and a few years ago she became Episcopalian. Didn’t see that coming! But apparently it was due to disillusionment with ‘the church’ and the clerical abuse. I’ve never discussed it with her because we’re not on that level of familiarity (also, its none of my business!).


#102

Wow! Thats an affliction and persecution!

We are called to suffer for righteousness, right?

Im not saying i would be brave and bold and firm against all persecution. But we should, right?


#103

I think when it comes from inside only God can really tell the heart.

One of the things that I have to say is that I am not a man. There was something inherently emasculating to what my family was going through that I, as a female, can never understand. I provide for my family but it is not the same as a male.

It affected me, too. It will affect the way I raise my children. They will not be “active” in the Church as I was. They will learn doctrine, they will go to Mass…but they will be encouraged to voulenteer…but never, ever will they be permitted take a lead role. At least under my roof.

It would be ideal if my brothers could look past the pain and return. It would be especially good for my older brother who really wishes he could. He’s come to Mass with me (refrained from Communion) and won’t return my Scott Hahn book because he’s “still reading” it…after a decade. (he’s returned other, non-religious ones) One of my brothers is a hardcore atheist—I don’t see that changing. (although he refuses to discuss anything, ever, so I have no idea what’s in his heart) My 3rd brother will still enter a Church but attends Mass irregularly so he can go “unnoticed” by the Church.

There is more fear and more pain than I can respond to. I do think that God will be merciful.


#104

Know a guy who went to Catholic schools from 1 -12. He left the Catholic Church and actually because a Protestant pastor. I dont know how his family felt about it. But he has a blessed life, loving congregation and family. Great guy. I am not going to judge him or call him less Christian and certainly not less worthy than us.


#105

This story of yours is hard yo even listen to!!

This is terrible, and i dont know how someone can be in a position of representing our Lord and afflict people with hardship and pain!

So, this is very different than “rejecting Catholic Teaching” which i was debating.

I think there is definitely cases of genuine Christians being exiled away from participating in their parish life and worship, through no fault of their own.


#106

But what does your Church say about those choices?


#107

Well, i do think God’s love is wider than the Catholic Church.


#108

Im not sure what that means. You are comparing love to an institution He promised to be with.

He didnt promise to be in every member, and even warns of false members!

But He gave Himself in His Eucharist to the Church! How is the Church not filled with His love? Because some members reject Him?

His Written Word and Body and Blood and Holy Spirit are available to us.

If evil men withhold these from innocent faithful, then there are good leaders who sympathize for their persecution! And Jesus will see their suffering, and comfort them.


#109

It is different, but thats why I am extremely offended when people can universally declare themselves judge and jury and make a line in the sand that they declare is uncrossable.

Sometimes, bad things happen.

If you have a prayer to spare, talking about this reminded me of one of the priests involved. He knew my family was innocent and yet didn’t want to get his hands dirty. He had a nice home and a nice life and I even think a dog or a cat or something. He was always in the eye of the hierarchy to perhaps become a Bishop. When everything finally came to a head and the Archdioceses stepped in through the act of someone above, he was the only one who showed true remorse. (not just for our case, but for others, too) He asked to “discern out” of the diocesan priesthood and into a religious order—one that did missionary work, I believe. Last I heard of him, years ago, he had given up everything and was overseas.

I don’t even know his full name, but I do offer my prayers. I think his pain is likely very great.


#110

[quote=“Xanthippe_Voorhees, post:109, topic:458629, full:true”]
It is different, but thats why I am extremely offended when people can universally declare themselves judge and jury and make a line in the sand that they declare is uncrossable.

Sometimes, bad things happen.
[/quote]Did your family become members of a Protestant church?


#111

Oldest brother, yes–he belongs to a Jesus-believing church that “has no hierarchy”. Middle brother no, he is an atheist. Younger brother no, he simply attends Mass when he feels like it (which is rarely—I’d say he’s agnostic).

My father and mother attend Mass (though not when they travel), and like myself, it’s only about Mass, they are even stricter in their “no participation” policy. They attend Mass, they get out. They do not stay for any social reason. I do not think they give money to the Church directly—although I do know they give to a few religious orders.


#112

People have always felt a disconnect with the idea of a institution built and closely ‘commanded’ by those subject to sin. Naturally scandals make this ideology more apparent and cause people to think they are right. Confirmation bias, is an easy thing to get swept into.

As a non-denominational Christian, I’d surely say that I have my issues with rogue Catholics and their clearly corrupt attitudes and actions.

But I’m always careful not to apportion that blame to the church itself. Which is something many converts can’t do when they finally throw in the towel.

I can argue with Protestants all day (flaws in their biblical interpretation) but the same thing applies;

You can’t allow jaded actions of a few to mar the whole. Even though that is very easy to do, should you feel perhaps, that the buck stops with the leadership?

It branches further into the vast differences in theological and historical understanding that individual Christians have. I often approach a conversation armed with history and science. Because these tend to be the mediums of the day; only to find that many Christians do adopt a faith alone strategy as it were.

They have very little global perspective of faith. Something that frustrates me about all forms of believer.

I’d say most commonly speaking to former Catholics, as is indeed the case here in the U.K, is the the culture of ditching views they see as dated or unsupported/sustainable in real life. Increasingly the case in younger people. The see no ‘reality’ in their faith.

A wider problem with ‘belief’ itself therefore, from a defensive point of view; might be that you can draw on an incredible knowledge but only if you have it. if you haven’t any real thought beyond what you’ve been told, so called ‘blind faith’ I find it flaky and weak at best. Primarily because such people are very vulnerable to clever debate and have nothing to answer it with. (Creating doubt).

Such a Christianity (as the whole) will not endure the future social change we are now witnessing and that should be addressed.


#113

Why dont you leave the Church?


#114

I believe it has the truth. However, I do not trust that I will not be brought to harm somehow. That is why I take what is required (the sacraments), give what is required (basic money and some time) and do not do more.

I feel that I can operate under the radar and thus prevent any harm to my household…maybe that’s hubristic, but that’s all I’ve got.


#115

Are you responding to me?

I am not comparing. Gods love is in and beyond the Catholic Church.


#116

I think your faith is stronger than mine. Only God knows.


#117

Ok. Does His love compel believers to offer Communion outside His Church?


#118

Sorry, i dont understand your question. Communion as in fellowship or Eucharistic Sacrament?


#119

Eucharist celebration


#120

If they do not share our beliefs it would not make sense to offer the Sacrament.
That does not mean God does not love and accept them just as we should.


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