Do you need to attend Mass twice on a Solemnity?


#1

Hi Catholic Answers

This is my first post. I was wondering if you needed to attend Mass on a Selemondy. Today is the Selemnondy of Saints Peter and Paul. We are going to Mass this evening. So do I need to go tonight and tomorrow because it’s a Selemnondy?
Thanks for your help.


#2

If you are going to the Vigil Mass this evening then you do not have to go tomorrow.

God Bless…


#3

You do not **need **to attend Mass on a solemnity if it isn’t a Holy Day of Obligation.

In the present case, the anticipated Mass on Saturday evening is a Sunday Mass so if you attend that there is no need to also attend on Sunday to fulfill the Sunday obligation. Where I live, the solemnity was celebrated earlier in the day on Saturday (and on Friday evening by way of the Vigil).


#4

However, in England and Wales, the solemnity is transferred to tomorrow, i.e., Sunday.


#5

It depends on where you live. In the United States, all Holy Days of Obligation are transferred to the closest Sunday.


#6

This is not accurate information.


#7

Ah. Okay. Where I live now, nothing is ever transferred and a Holy Day of Obligation falling on a Saturday or Monday means we are obliged to attend Mass two days in a row. So yes, it does depend upon where one lives. YMMV.

The fact does remain, however, that if a given solemnity is not an HDO there is no Mass obligation. From what I understand, the Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul is an HDO in the UK but not in the US. Please correct if I am misinformed :blush:


#8

I didn’t think so either—the last diocese I lived in in the US moved very few HDOs, if any (it’s been a while, and my memory isn’t what it used to be)—but I wasn’t sure and thought even if it was the case way back when it still might have changed since I left the country.


#9

Thanks everyone. I’ve heard it said that if the Holy Day falls on a Saturday you need to go twice. I just wanted to make sure.
God Bless


closed #10

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.