Do you pray Our Lords prayer

There are a few Evangelicals, particularly those from the “anti-liturgical” school, who do not pray the Lord’s Prayer (also known as the “Our Father”). They say that Jesus never intended it to be a set formula, repeated over and over again by His followers throughout the ages. Rather, (they claim) He gave it as a general “outline” for our prayers, which should always be put in ones own words.
What do you say about Our Lord pray,do you pray the Lords pray

When I was a kid, our church prayed the Lord’s Prayer all the time.

I’ve moved into a new church now, and no one says in out loud, but I pray it myself sometimes. :smiley:

I was taught that, when to pray the Lord’s Prayer, to add at the end, "For Thine is the Kingdom, the Power, and the Glory forever. Amen."
I heard Catholics don’t say that part…?

Come to a Catholic Mass. You’ll be encouraged to say the prayer aloud, including “For thine is…” :slight_smile:

Been to a Mass Lately? I feel like watching that episode of the Tudors where this specifically was added to the prayer. Liturgically Catholics say that part, but in our Bible Translations it is mostly not included.

Oh wow!

So, Catholics do say, “For thine is…”? That’s really cool - I thought they didn’t.

Thanks for the invitation/s! Maybe I will visit a Mass in the future just to see. :smiley:

I am familiar with “The Lord’s Prayer”. It is not something I engage in practicing unless I visit a liturgical church…OR I am with a group…say Mennonites or Brethren who recite it for a specific reason.

Friends typically do not “recite” prewritten “prayers” unless it’s part of a devotional approach a particular Friend is engaged for their own edification and spiritual development.

I think it is both a prayer and a pattern or outline of how we should prayer.

agreed. Thought about this at Mass today :thumbsup:

Mostly Catholics (myself esp) do not add the Doxology “For thine is…” with the sole exception of during nthe Mass.

Like during public recitation of the Rosary, the Our Father ends with, “and deliver us from evil”.

One other difference in the OF, is that Catholics, Lutherans, Episcopalians use tresspasses, but those from the Calvinist Tradition, Presbyterians, Reformed, and Congregationals will say "forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

I have several Evangelical friends… All of them pray the Lord’s Prayer with everyone else at school. They know the prayer, but they do not pray it as often at church. The only objection they have is how often it is prayed, since it can be rushed too much because of this… (which is understandable, because sometimes the Our Father is so prayed at school so fast it becomes almost like a tongue twister =( )
The only person who I’ve heard objecting to the Lord’s Prayer (not online) is a Mormon friend who says she and other Mormons do not pray this prayer because it is repetitive, etc… the same reason you give.

[quote=Bill Pick;]There are a few Evangelicals, particularly those from the “anti-liturgical” school, who do not pray the Lord’s Prayer (also known as the “Our Father”). They say that Jesus never intended it to be a set formula, repeated over and over again by His followers throughout the ages.
What do you say about Our Lord pray,do you pray the Lords pray
[/quote]

Lets see, its OK to “memorize” the outline, but using the words that Christ chose to use is somehow a bad idea??? I think the problem with those of the "anti-liturgical’ school is that they merely say the Lord’s prayer and dont actually “pray” it. Now dont get me wrong - I wouldnt limit my prayer life to the Lords prayer, but there is nothing wrong with praying it - it is a perfectly good prayer with the only potential problem being the disposition of the person reciting it.

Rather, (they claim) He gave it as a general “outline” for our prayers, which should always be put in ones own words.

Hmmmm - lets play the sola scriptura game and see if that theory holds water…
Matthew 6 "Your Father knows what you need before you ask him. "This is how you are to pray: Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name…

Luke 11: He was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples.” He said to them***, "When you pray, say***: Father, hallowed be your name…

Im sorry, but I dont see anything about modeling our prayers after the Our Father. In Matt He says “This is how you are to pray” in the context of not worrying about what you say because our “Father knows what you need before you ask him.” There really is no indication that this is merely an “outline” for our personal prayers. In Luke our Lord is even more specific - he doesnt merely say this is “how” to pray, but says, “…say: Father, hallowed be your name…” To me it is pretty clear that he is saying to say the prayer as he instructed them to say it. Again, there really is no contextual justification for the claim that it is a “general outline” of prayer.
Now I will again add that I find nothing wrong with whatever form of prayer one chooses to pray. I am simply commenting on the unjustifiable claim that Christ intended the “Our Father” as merely a “general outline” for our prayer - he never said any such thing.
In addition, if you read the Didache (circa AD 90) you will see that the “Our Father” is recommended to be said 3 times daily:

Chapter 8. Fasting and Prayer (the Lord’s Prayer). But let not your fasts be with the hypocrites, for they fast on the second and fifth day of the week. Rather, fast on the fourth day and the Preparation (Friday). Do not pray like the hypocrites, but rather as the Lord commanded in His Gospel, like this: Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us today our daily (needful) bread, and forgive us our debt as we also forgive our debtors. And bring us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one (or, evil); for Thine is the power and the glory for ever…
Pray this three times each day.

So there you have it - facts vs opinions…

So, Catholics do say, “For thine is…”? That’s really cool - I thought they didn’t.

Catholics of the Byzantine Tradition always have.

You didn’t think the Latin Church was the sum total of the Catholic Church, did you?

I pray it often and even in Latin, as well as the Hail Mary, also in Latin. These are powerful prayers and should be prayed as often as one remembers to do so. Many Christians save it for special occasions, i.e. graduation ceremonies, etc. It is a great weapon against the Devil and the evil ones.

I encourage all Christians everywhere to pray it often.

It can be used as an outline just like the Apostle’s Creed. If you break the phrases down there are some deep truths there. One could spend a long time in contemplation over each phrase and come to deeper understandings as a result.

Peace…

MW

You are incorrect, in the Byzantines and the Orthodox the priest alone says after “deliver us from evil”…“For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, now and ever, and to the ages of ages Amen.”

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