Do you think youth/young adult groups or any kind of groups is worth joining?


#1

I’m in a YA group in my parish. I like it, but in a way, find it too cheesy with all the icebreakers and kiddie stuff. I just feel like I’m in kindergarten or something. Maybe that’s why many have left. Either way, I also feel like we only talk about the same thing over and over, like God’s love and the sacraments, and nothing new really or anything edifying or much of actually teaching us anything. Any time we’ve talked about the sacraments, it’s really basic stuff, they never touch deeper than what any normal catholic would know. I’ve even wanted to tell them the things I know, but of course, it would be rude to interrupt the speaker to add a many more things and I’m quite an introvert so I keep my mouth shut. Maybe it’s because I’ve dwelved deep into theology that I feel it’s so basic. I’m not saying I’m smart or anything, just that it feels basic.

Besides that, most that are in the group right now, already have known each other before the group started so I feel like the odd one out, as I’m the only one “new” there pretty much. And I’ve known people who have had bad experiences with groups in church that they decided never to join or serve again because it’s just too problematic. How about you? Do you think it’s better to stay away from groups? I know one priest that actually said it was better not to join groups because people in them can be quite troublesome and there can be gossip etc.


#2

I think it’s a bit drastic to decide never to join any groups again because one didn’t work out. In my lifetime I’ve joined a number of groups and seen others in my family also join various groups. Sometimes the group turned out to have gossips or cliques or just wasn’t what the person was looking for, and other times it was fun for a while but then got less fun or less useful so it was time to find a new group. It’s good to be able to do things on your own without a group, and maybe that’s what the priest was thinking too - that you shouldn’t need a group in order to pray or be a Catholic - but groups can also be fun and help you meet people if you’re new.

It does sound like the group you describe is pretty basic in its approach to Catholicism. Have you considered offering some constructive criticism to the leader? Maybe give some examples of topics you would like to see discussed? Have you talked to anyone else in the group about how the material seems quite basic? Perhaps you could help the group improve.


#3

Perhaps it depends on the group. My experience has been incredibly beneficial, and I was actually just talking with someone else in my religious community earlier tonight about how important young adult groups had been in our lives, and how we’d both like to try and continue with that in future ministry somehow. If something feels off with the one you attend, there very well may be, but I certainly wouldn’t dismiss them all. It may just need a little more oversight or something.

But also remember, everyone is at a different place in their faith journey. This will always be the case. Even in religious formation, and seminary, it starts out very very basic, because you just can’t assume everyone has had the same level of catechesis. Joining any new group can be bumpy, as you try to find you place, but as long as they’re welcoming, I’d give it some time. You all need time to get used to eachother, which is just natural human social behavior. If they’re not welcoming and are being exclusive, then that’s a different issue. I think it sounds like you may have a lot to share with the group, so I’d give it time. I found the community experience of young adult groups to be encouraging and inspiring.


#4

Have you considered joining a more adult community. If your understanding of theology is much deeper, you might find a home there. Believe me, any reasonable “adult” group would love to have a younger person with a more advanced understanding of faith. If you are 18 and male the Knights Of Columbus might be another thing.


#5

If you live in Canada and if you are a university student, you can join the Catholic Christian Outreach clubs across Canadian universities. I was a member of University of Calgary’s CCO club. CCO is focused on empowering Catholic university students who are exploring their faith and want to expand their faith as well, or want to know more about the Catholic faith. I, myself, became Catholic through their outreach.


#6

Maybe you’re ready for a more grown up Bible study or to read on your own.
Or maybe you want to join a soup kitchen or homeless outreach.

Being in Youth Group doesn’t mean you’re a good Catholic, and declining to join one doesn’t make you a bad Catholic.
To each his own :slightly_smiling_face:


#7

I wish I had something like this. Lol. Im also an introvert and don’t want to start it. :joy:


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