Do your priests pray the Rosary and the Chaplet of the D.M. with the congregation?


#1

There is a Catholic church in the city of Hawaiian Gardens, California where the priests lead their congregation in praying the Rosary followed by the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy after every Mass. Now that’s devotion!


#2

At our parish, we have weekly rosary devotions and on the first Sunday of the month, the rosary is recited prior to every mass, however this is done by the laity and the deacon, not the priests.

We had a guest Oblate of Servants of Mary priest visit our parish to do a Triduum prior to the feast of the Presentation on Feb.2nd. Each night he gave a talk, followed by the rosary & reconciliation. One night we celebrated mass, and another a healing service. It was refreshing to have this offered to us, but as usual the loyal ones attended but the majority did not take advantage of this very welcome opportunity,


#3

Well, I voted “yes” but:

Father often leads the DMC after daily Mass. At other times he leads a litany. He tries to expose people to different devotions.

He leads the Rosary every week during our Holy Hour. The Rosary on Sundays is before each Mass and led by laity.


#4

Our priests lead the congregation in the Morning Divine Office before each weekday Mass.


#5

I am out of town on business, and I went to a local Mass here. About 20 minutes before Mass, one of the congregation started up in leading the people there in the Rosary. It was great, I had never seen that before!


#6

Why should the priest have to do this with the congregation? These are popular devotions - unless there is a priestly blessing or benediction or something that goes along with it, nothing about the rosary or chaplet requires priestly faculties. Having the priest doesn’t make it any more holy. He doesn’t act in the person of Christ when he prays the rosary, or anything like that. The faithful absolutely need priests for the sacraments, but not for the rosary.

I think some priests may specifically avoid leading the congregation in the rosary after mass, to help people to develop their own prayer life, rather than feeling like they have to depend upon the priest for everything. I think getting lay people to lead prayers like this is also a good way to foster lay involvement and leadership (as opposed to putting untrained lay people in charge of liturgy, or something like that).


#7

Our parish is small in a rural area. Our priest has time to spend in prayer with the people after morning Mass. It’s not uncommon to see him praying in the chuch by himself at other times. Good example for all of us.

Deacon Tony


#8

the Rosary is prayed after 7am mass, but not by Priest or. deacons.Though on Sunday at 3pm we have a holy hour lead by one of our deacons in our adoration chapel.


#9

We pray the Rosary daily after Mass,Father ALWAYS leaves before we start. :frowning:

We pray a Parish, 4 Mystery Rosary on the first Saturday of each month. In the 8 months we have been doing this, our priest showed up for the first time just this month. Stayed for 2 Mysteries but did NOT pray them with us. He then left. :frowning:

He has never prayed the Chaplet with us. :frowning:

It would mean soooo much to the parish if he would join us in our devotional prayers. I know he has a busy schedule and can’t attend all of them. But at least ONCE a month would be nice.


#10

Our parish prays the Rosary before each Mass. On weekdays, Father is in the confessional before Mass, so the Deacon leads. On the Saturday vigil and on Sunday Masses, Father leads.

He will also lead the DMC on Divine Mercy Sunday. There is not a strong devoton to Divine Mercy at my parish.


#11

[quote=Bobby Jim]He doesn’t act in the person of Christ when he prays the rosary, or anything like that.
[/quote]

My understanding is that priests always act in persona Christi since they are always priests :slight_smile:


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.