Doctors and the pills?


#1

Hello everyone,
I am a guy and time and time again I've heard women say that their doctors want them to be on birth control pills to regulate their periods. Can anyone shed some light on this? I'm not encouraging the use of the pills but is it acceptable in these cases where doctors recommend it? Is this even necessary?

Thanks in advance


#2

The apologists answer this question better than most of us can. :)

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=18736
forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=15756


#3

There are 2 aspects to this question.

First, morally, as answered by the apologists: if there is a "medicine" that treats a condition, and a side effect is that it stops fertility, then morally it is ok.

However....

If you go to www.omsoul.com you will find a long list of doctors that will not prescribe any birth control pill, not only for moral reasons, but because they believe that it is extremely harmful, and does no "treating" of any kind.

The pill does not regulate cycles. A woman does not have a real period when on it, it just masks the symptoms of what's really wrong. The harmful effects are ridiculous.


#4

A bit of an asside, but you know what's scary? The World Health Organisation lists the Pill in the same catagory as Absestos, as a rather nasty carciongenic.

Its on their website.


#5

Acceptable morally, yes, I believe so.

Sensible medically, ordinarily not IMO. You would have to have some seriously messed-up periods to make it worth the increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, and stroke. And as another poster pointed out, it just treats the symptoms, rather than fixing the underlying problem, which nobody usually even bothers to diagnose.

I do not subscribe to the "everyone does it" justification of medical practices (or of anything else). :) I think it's entirely possible for most people to be wrong about something. My mother watches The View and Oprah religiously and thinks I'm delusional (because of the "most people can be wrong" thing). So you can take my opinion with as much of a grain of salt as you think is appropriate. ;)

--Jen


#6

[quote="vera_dicere, post:4, topic:222824"]
A bit of an asside, but you know what's scary? The World Health Organisation lists the Pill in the same catagory as Absestos, as a rather nasty carciongenic.

Its on their website.

[/quote]

To be fair, there are a lot of things on that list which people commonly use everyday. This includes ethanol, which is a fundamental component of the celebration of the Eucharist. Not to mention that I'm a very enthusiastic wine collector and drinker, so I'll take the list with a grain of salt.


#7

I have been finding out by reading various studies that the hormonal contraceptive pill has serious side effects when used long-term.

I'll admit, for health issues I was on it for a very short time because I probably would have had to run to the ER for how bad it was getting. After I got off it, things sort of "normalized" again so I don't have to take it.

Personally I didn't like the pill because of the side effects. What many people also don't know is that the pill also causes a woman over time to be less sexually attracted to her partner. How's that for irony:eek: The pill also changes the way a woman's body naturally ovulates, and this also affects the way men perceive her because of the hormonal changes. If you're interested in the research, I'd need some time to do some digging but could find it.

What I don't like is how doctors default to the hormonal pill as if it's a cure all, and it's not. It's not even something that really addresses the problem, but it more so deals with the symptoms. Granted, I am sooo glad that the issues I was having a couple months ago have dissipated, but I would not want to go back on the pill again. There are many non-Catholics who also have huge issues with the pill, from an environmental perspective to holistic medicine perspectives too. I recently had a doctor who tried to push me to take it long-term and I refuse. She probably thinks I'm stupid. :shrug: I guess I'll just have to find another doctor.


#8

Hi, I can only speak from my personal experience on this issue but most doctors I have been too really, really pressure women to go on birth control despite what the patient wants. The doctors I have experienced did not respect my opinions and came up with a bevy of excuses as to why I should be on it. First off, I just want to say that I am committed to a chaste lifestyle. However, it was beyond the comprehension of my doctors that someone would practice abstinence. Secondly, once I told them I practiced abstinence, they would come up with several other reasons why I should be on birth control, the first one being acne and the other one was to regulate my PMS. No matter what I said or did, they would try to find a way to put me on it. And this was four different doctors. I could easily see if someone wasn't as "obstinate" as I am, they might take their doctor's advice and go on it.


#9

[quote="turtle18, post:8, topic:222824"]
Hi, I can only speak from my personal experience on this issue but most doctors I have been too really, really pressure women to go on birth control despite what the patient wants. The doctors I have experienced did not respect my opinions and came up with a bevy of excuses as to why I should be on it. First off, I just want to say that I am committed to a chaste lifestyle. However, it was beyond the comprehension of my doctors that someone would practice abstinence. Secondly, once I told them I practiced abstinence, they would come up with several other reasons why I should be on birth control, the first one being acne and the other one was to regulate my PMS. No matter what I said or did, they would try to find a way to put me on it. And this was four different doctors. I could easily see if someone wasn't as "obstinate" as I am, they might take their doctor's advice and go on it.

[/quote]

Yup. This is exactly how my experience has been too.


#10

[quote="spunjalebi, post:9, topic:222824"]
Yup. This is exactly how my experience has been too.

[/quote]

Mine as well. It seems to be a "quick fix" option for many doctors, but IMO it is better to actually find out what is going on with your body to cause the doctor to consider the birth control pill than to continue to "mask" the problem with the pill. I am very suspect of any doctor that wants to prescribe the pill without doing further tests for a thorough diagnosis.


#11

[quote="PatriceA, post:10, topic:222824"]
Mine as well. It seems to be a "quick fix" option for many doctors, but IMO it is better to actually find out what is going on with your body to cause the doctor to consider the birth control pill than to continue to "mask" the problem with the pill. I am very suspect of any doctor that wants to prescribe the pill without doing further tests for a thorough diagnosis.

[/quote]

I know that for some people, being on the pill does help regulate periods. I think it's important for women with heavy and severe bleeding to STOP the bleeding so it's not crazy and to also halt anemia, but for long-term use I also think there are other solutions.

I just wish more doctors were willing to explore other solutions, but in the end they aren't unless you're lucky enough to come across a doctor who does. I still have yet to meet a doctor like that, and I suspect that a reproductive endocrinologist could help.


#12

[quote="spunjalebi, post:11, topic:222824"]
I know that for some people, being on the pill does help regulate periods. I think it's important for women with heavy and severe bleeding to STOP the bleeding so it's not crazy and to also halt anemia, but for long-term use I also think there are other solutions.

I just wish more doctors were willing to explore other solutions, but in the end they aren't unless you're lucky enough to come across a doctor who does. I still have yet to meet a doctor like that, and I suspect that a reproductive endocrinologist could help.

[/quote]

The pill does NOT regulate periods. It halts ovulation, and allows breakthrough bleeding. It is not a period.

go to www.omsoul.com


#13

[quote="agapewolf, post:12, topic:222824"]
The pill does NOT regulate periods. It halts ovulation, and allows breakthrough bleeding. It is not a period.

go to www.omsoul.com

[/quote]

Well I can only speak for my experience. It halted the bleeding after using it for a few short weeks and I haven't been on it since, and have had "normal" periods. I also have issues with ovulation, and taking the pill allowed my estrogen levels to rise which really helped.


#14

[quote="spunjalebi, post:13, topic:222824"]
Well I can only speak for my experience. It halted the bleeding after using it for a few short weeks and I haven't been on it since, and have had "normal" periods. I also have issues with ovulation, and taking the pill allowed my estrogen levels to rise which really helped.

[/quote]

It was not a "normal" period at all. Breakthrough bleeding is not the result of ovulation. If you don't ovulate, then you can't have a period.

This is the absolute ridiculous part of the pill that has everyone fooled. They think everything is healthy because it appears to be so, but it is so far from health, it shuts down the reproductive system.


#15

[quote="agapewolf, post:14, topic:222824"]
It was not a "normal" period at all. Breakthrough bleeding is not the result of ovulation. If you don't ovulate, then you can't have a period.

This is the absolute ridiculous part of the pill that has everyone fooled. They think everything is healthy because it appears to be so, but it is so far from health, it shuts down the reproductive system.

[/quote]

I think you're misunderstanding me...I was having extensive, heavy, and crazy bleeding before I was ever on the pill, ever. Taking the pill stopped it or else I would literally have no iron (and still barely do). You can also have bleeding issues and not ovulate. It's called PCOS. My system was already going haywire.


#16

[quote="spunjalebi, post:15, topic:222824"]
I think you're misunderstanding me...I was having extensive, heavy, and crazy bleeding before I was ever on the pill, ever. Taking the pill stopped it or else I would literally have no iron (and still barely do). You can also have bleeding issues and not ovulate. It's called PCOS. My system was already going haywire.

[/quote]

No, you are misunderstanding me.
You had a struggling to work reproductive system, and you took "the pill" and it shut it down completely. It made you think it was working because it appeared so (and you keep saying you had a period and it regulated you), but it didn't. It shuts off ovulation, therefore there is nothing to be "regular", except this breakthrough bleeding.

Your definition of PCOS is SOMETIMES the symptoms, not the actual definition of PCOS. I have pcos, and with a napro doctor, got it cured. (Not covered up, but cured).


#17

[quote="agapewolf, post:16, topic:222824"]
No, you are misunderstanding me.
You had a struggling to work reproductive system, and you took "the pill" and it shut it down completely. It made you think it was working because it appeared so (and you keep saying you had a period and it regulated you), but it didn't. It shuts off ovulation, therefore there is nothing to be "regular", except this breakthrough bleeding.

Your definition of PCOS is SOMETIMES the symptoms, not the actual definition of PCOS. I have pcos, and with a napro doctor, got it cured. (Not covered up, but cured).

[/quote]

No, you're still not getting what I'm saying. I took the pill to stop the bleeding which was happening for several weeks, and after I was done with the course I didn't take it any more after that. It's been months since then, and since then I have had "normal" periods, as in they occurred at the typical 28-30something day cycles. And I actually DO have PCOS that's been diagnosed. But whatever, you're going to think that I'm advocating for regular usage of the pill anyway.


#18

[quote="spunjalebi, post:17, topic:222824"]
No, you're still not getting what I'm saying. I took the pill to stop the bleeding which was happening for several weeks, and after I was done with the course I didn't take it any more after that. It's been months since then, and since then I have had "normal" periods, as in they occurred at the typical 28-30something day cycles. And I actually DO have PCOS that's been diagnosed. But whatever, you're going to think that I'm advocating for regular usage of the pill anyway.

[/quote]

No, I don't think your advocating regular usage, I'm correcting your misunderstanding of what the pill does.

I understand you completely. You said:

I know that for some people, being on the pill does help regulate periods.

THIS is what I am arguing against. It is impossible for the pill to "regulate" periods. A regular period is one that happens after ovulation, moderately, and doesn't even have to be that "regular" time wise as it is a healthy thing for ovulation to be delayed due to stress and other things.

When the pill shuts down ovulation, one does not have a period at all. It can't be regular when one doesn't have a period.


#19

Okay so I botched some words:o and meanings. I still personally think that I needed to stop my own issues or else I would have been bleeding to death...

I will also put it out there that finding a NFP doctor or a Napro doctor is very, very difficult, especially if your insurance won't cover such visits. I am currently in the search of finding a doctor like that but to no avail:mad: Then some of the doctors are male and well I'm personally not sure if I am completely comfortable with that.


#20

[quote="spunjalebi, post:19, topic:222824"]
Okay so I botched some words:o and meanings. I still personally think that I needed to stop my own issues or else I would have been bleeding to death...

I will also put it out there that finding a NFP doctor or a Napro doctor is very, very difficult, especially if your insurance won't cover such visits. I am currently in the search of finding a doctor like that but to no avail:mad: Then some of the doctors are male and well I'm personally not sure if I am completely comfortable with that.

[/quote]

Yes, you should have tried to stop the bleeding, I never ever said nor even implied that should have been left.

However, there are most likely (and the list of docs on omsoul would say definitely) better ways to go about it.

Finding an NFP doc isn't always "very very difficult". I'm lucky I live in a city with 3 OBGYNs that are napro. All of them are male, and all of them are WAY better personality wise then the several women docs I've been to. I'm way more comfortable and I trust them so much more.


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