Doctrine and Dogma


#1

What, exactly, is the difference between “doctrine” and “dogma”?


#2

A dogma is something declared by the Church as something we MUST believe. A doctrine is something that is taught openly but does not have such a declaration from the Church.

The Church does not HAVE to declare each doctrine as a dogma, only as they see fit do they do so.

BH
protestanterrors.com


#3

Ok, I think I get it now… let’s see
Mary’s Immaculate Conception is a DOGMA of the Church
Mary as Mediatrix of Grace is a doctrine

Would that be a good example?


#4

A dogma is something declared by the Church as something we MUST believe. A doctrine is something that is taught openly but does not have such a declaration from the Church.

Adding a bit more information…

The Catholic Church does not usually use the term “dogma” or emphasize this distinction because it might give the Faithful the wrong idea.

Some Catholics might believe that they are at liberty to reject doctrine because it has not been dogmatically defined. This is not true. All Catholics are expected to accept both dogma and doctrine. For this reason, the term “doctrine” is often used and understood by Catholics to include dogma (and the term “dogma” is rarely used).

For example, the prohibition against the use of artificial birth control is a doctrine, not a dogma. But no Catholic is at liberty to disregard this teaching.

The distinction between “doctrine” and “dogma” is a technical one. It has no bearing on the person in the pew.


#5

[quote=DavidFilmer]The distinction between “doctrine” and “dogma” is a technical one. It has no bearing on the person in the pew.
[/quote]

I agree. When I’m speaking to people about the Church, I usually use these two terms interchangably.

In Christ,
Rand


#6

[quote=DavidFilmer]Some Catholics might believe that they are at liberty to reject doctrine because it has not been dogmatically defined. This is not true. All Catholics are expected to accept both dogma and doctrine. For this reason, the term “doctrine” is often used and understood by Catholics to include dogma (and the term “dogma” is rarely used).
[/quote]

More precisely: Catholics must believe dogma with a divine and Catholic faith, and Catholics must give doctrine their religious submission of mind and will.


#7

Thanks so much, this was very helpful


#8

dogma is the Tradition of the Church (capital T). This is the tradition handed down by Jesus Christ through His apostles. Baptism is a Dogma.

Doctrine consist both the Tradition and tradition (small letter t)

examples
tradition -----> celibacy
Tradition----> sacraments


#9

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