Does anointing of the sick forgive mortal sins?

I have just read that anointing of the sick forgives sins. Does it forgive mortal sins as well?

Here are a couple of good links:

therealpresence.org/essentials/sacraments/acc38.htm

The guilt of mortal sin is removed, so that a sinner is restored to God’s friendship. With the guilt the eternal punishment due to mortal sin is also removed. On this level, anointing has the same effect as Baptism and the sacrament of Penance. Moreover, the sorrow required for remission of sin is the fear of God, based on faith, which makes anointing so precious. Even though a person is unconscious when anointed, yet he is restored to God’s grace with the minimum requirement of what we call imperfect contrition, which means sorrow for sin because a believer fears the just punishments of an offended God.

In this link, you will find, if you scroll down, all of the conditions for receiving this sacrament.

ewtn.com/expert/answers/anointing_of_the_sick.htm

[quote=Jocelyn]Does it forgive mortal sins as well?
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Yes.

[quote=Jocelyn]I have just read that anointing of the sick forgives sins. Does it forgive mortal sins as well?
[/quote]

It forgives all sins of those persons who are unable to confess their sins in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Such as those who are unconscious. Under normal circumstances a person receiving the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick should be instructed to go to Confession just before receiving the Anointing of the Sick.

That is one of the primary reasons that this sacrament may only be given by a priest, since he alone has the power to give absolution.

I know that many Catholic chaplains at hospitals are lay ministers and deacons, but they still cannot administer the Sacrament of the Sick.

Hello All:

I am now confussed. If a person is in grave mortal sin, but has not been to confession with no intent to go and receive the annointing is it valid? Should the priest insist that the person go to confession before or at the very least after?

scared

Yes,the anointing is valid. However, if the person who is being anointed is also able to make a confession at that time, he should ask the priest to listen to his confession However,that means he is not unconscious or loaded with hospital tubes or is in severe pain, in such a case, his sins are forgiven, all of them…because there is a possibility of impending death.

[quote=scared]Hello All:

I am now confussed. If a person is in grave mortal sin, but has not been to confession with no intent to go and receive the annointing is it valid? Should the priest insist that the person go to confession before or at the very least after?

scared
[/quote]

A Person should never receive any Sacrament (except Reconciliation) when they know that they have committed a Mortal sin and have the ability to go to Confession first.

I think that celebrating the Sacrament of Anointing of the sick at Mass once or twice a year is great. However the announcement should be made. "Anyone intending to receive this Sacrament at Mass who is aware of having committed a Mortal sin must come to Confession before receiving the Anointing of the Sick.

Brother Rich is correct. If you look at the ritual for Anointing of the Sick it specifically has an option for people to go to confession. You can also look at the Code of Canon Law. CIC 1007: “The anointing of the sick is not to be conferred upon those who persevere obstinately in manifest grave sin.” That being said an unconscious person who was in grave manifest sin could only be denied the sacrament if they did not have an implicit desire for it. A good article written by a layman on the topic can be seen here: jimmyakin.com/2006/10/in_extremis.html

The good news for the dying person is that Father could use the Rite for Emergencies (their are different rituals for the Anointing of the Sick) which includes the Apostolic Pardon which removes all punishment due to sin both here and in heaven at the time of death. However, playing the I’m going to hope that a priest is their who remembers to give me the Apostolic Pardon at my deathbed is a very bad idea. We never know the day nor the hour of our death. Father might forget the Apostolic Pardon. We might die before Father gets their. Live for Jesus and don’t look back.

This is all a theological opinion. I did not see any papal documents, the Catechism of the Catholic Church nor the Code of Canon Law cited.

Can we just let old threads die??

CatholicTheolog post was excellent, showing the canon law.

Really there are many interesting aspects to this sacrament. The sins are forgiven for those that may receive the sacrament, if not able to obtain the forgiveness of sin through the sacrament of Penance, due to their current state, but only if the person has the proper disposition (see especially CCEO 737.1).

CIC
Canon 1005 This sacrament is to be administered when there is a doubt whether the sick person has attained the use of reason, whether the person is dangerously ill, or whether the person is dead.
Canon 1006 This sacrament is to be conferred upon sick persons who requested it at least implicitly when they were in control of their faculties.
Canon 1007 The anointing of the sick is not to be conferred upon those who obstinately persist in manifest serious sin.

CCEO
Canon 740 Christian faithful who are gravely ill, who lack consciousness or the use of reason, are presumed to want this sacrament to be administered to them in danger of death or even at another time according to the judgment of the priest.
Canon 737.1. By the sacramental anointing of the sick with prayers of a priest, the Christian faithful who are gravely ill and sincerely contrite receive grace, by which, strengthened by the hope of eternal reward and absolved from sins, they are disposed to correct their lives and are helped in patiently enduring their infirmity and suffering.

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